Benefits of Partnership Between Employers and Training Providers

The partnership between employers and training providers is important for both small businesses and massive corporations alike. Small business owners find this to be a frugal option, seeing as how they can’t afford to hire experts, which means that they are forced to train their own employees to become experts. As for the big companies, by having a solid collaboration with an RTO, they can customize the training program so that it fits the needs of their company. In other words, they’re not training niche experts, in general; instead, they’re training experts with a specific set of skills necessary for the position that they’re about to assume. Here are several benefits of this partnership that you should know about.

1. The choice of target skills

When it comes to traditional, formal education, its biggest downside is the fact that it gives an uniformed format of education, instead of specializing. This is where RTOs have a much greater advantage. Instead of training your entire staff to do a plethora of tasks around the office, you, as an employer, get to choose courses that benefit your brand the most. Needless to say, this makes your job of delegating tasks much simpler, as well, seeing as how you get to assign functions to your staff according to their skills and abilities. This can also help you avoid a lot about bias in choosing functions for team members.

2. Preparing for the future

The most important thing about the company’s future is the consistency of staff. Now, the problem in this lies in the fact that people leave your employ all the time. They go someplace else, start projects of their own, retire or even go on leave. The latter might not fall under the same category as the first three, yet, it still makes a team member unavailable. So, you need to have someone capable to take their place in order not to allow for an absence of a single team member to cause downtime. Moreover, you need to plan for the growth, which is why you need to start preparing your staff in time. By having assistance from VET professionals, you can easier anticipate these changes and get a better understanding of the process necessary to prepare your staff for this.

3. Setting objectives

Perhaps the biggest advantage, and the most underestimated one out there is your ability to set the objectives for the training. Namely, this training costs effort, time and resources. We’re not just talking about paying for the course but also providing your employees with materials like Compliant Learning Resources. So, you need to know that you’re getting your money’s worth from this deal. You need to know how the performance of the employee will improve after the training. Other than this, you need to know how this will affect your employee retention rate. The last thing you need is for someone to complete the training, under your tutelage and sponsorship only to leave you once a better offer arrives.

4. Including your employees

Keep in mind that while employee training is a positive thing, it’s not necessarily seen as such by an employee who sees it as mandatory and unnecessary. For instance, sending someone on a course that will prepare them to do a task that they don’t really care about might cause the employee to leave or, at very least, underperform. Instead, you need to allow your team members to become an active participant in the decision-making process. This can be much more efficient with the sufficient amount of collaboration with the training provider. In fact, putting in touch the employee in question and the training provider is the kind of networking that works to everyone’s benefit.

5. Internal vs. outsourced training

At the very end, it’s important to mention that there’s another form of employee training, one that’s much more common, yet, also the one that we’ve failed to mention so far. We’re talking about the internal or the in-house training. This either requires you to hire trainers or appoint some of your team members as mentors (start a mentoring program). Such a course of action will tailor your mentoring program to the needs of your company and generate materials to be reused in the future. Nonetheless, by teaming up with the right training provider and learning material supplier, you can achieve all of that with the addition of a much higher quality of training program. After all, we’re talking about specialized RTO.

In conclusion

At the very end, a partnership between employers and training providers is a business world occurrence that takes place virtually every single day. In other words, it’s something that deeply affects your business model and your business plans. Still, until you know all the benefits that you get to reap from this relationship, you won’t be able to tell just how cost-effective it is to invest your time and resources to make it all happen.

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Future of Work Trends, Part 4: Future of Training in HR | Featured Image

Future of Work Trends, Part 4: Future of Training in HR

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With the introduction of video sharing sites like YouTube, Vimeo, Daily Motion, etc. the employee training has transformed forever. Online video sites have enabled many companies to upload their training videos and making it available to their employees. Companies which previously have to schedule personal training sessions by matching a time as per the availability of trainer and employees which were a tedious task and even time-consuming at times are now switching to online training. Online training & career development facilitates employees to take up the training as per their schedules and from their comfort zones.

Recently many companies are re-configuring learning and development to become less campus-based classes and more of on-demand online training. This way it becomes easier for both the trainers and trainees. Trainers record their training videos once and do not have to take training sessions again and again. Trainees can choose a topic for training as per their requirement and interest, saving them both time and efforts. This makes employees more independent as they can choose a topic to develop a particular skill of their choice rather than what management thinks is best for them, although most time the curriculum is set and is also best especially for early stage careers.

Constant technological up-gradations have made the online video sites to become more user-friendly. These sites often remind users about an unfinished video so the person doesn’t miss out on something he left midway. They also suggest similar videos to enhance user’s skills and increase their understanding on the topic through different video perspectives. Online training videos are also setting up a benchmark in the employee assessment program. Nowadays many companies are evaluating employees by undergoing a specific training and assessment program. Employees are trained on a specific process by taking up online workshops and then are made to give tests based upon which they are promoted to specific positions.

Online Training

This way a fair evaluation procedure is followed giving only the deserving ones the much-needed promotion. Even employees find themselves in a win-win situation as they get to upgrade their skills. With tremendous growth in the online employee training and workshops which is slowly transforming how we learn & evaluate, it is not wrong to say that in a few year will see a more advanced and efficient ways into learning & assessments, and maybe this is a job within HR that can be taken away by machines that may be able to assess faster and smarter without the human error and provide more accurate assessments.

Just like online video sites are setting up a new trend in the workplace, similar growth can be seen in the online human resources functions in particular with training/learning and development. We shall continue with the next trend in the fifth and final part of the series where we will focus on how human resources functions are rapidly moving online, and that is a fascinating thought but also slightly scary as we ought to maintain the human and machine balance in what is needs to be a personnel function.

To read more on similar topics explore our blogs; to speak with us about employer’s hubs and how we can help transform your contractor talent management by bringing efficiencies through our simple cloud platform, get in touch.


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CEO’s Corner: Charlene Li on Technology and Employee Experience

Charlene Li

In the end of June 2017 CEO’s Corner post put a spotlight on Charlene Li, Principal Analyst at Altimeter (a Prophet Company) and keynote at this year’s HR TechXpo. Li supports leaders to thrive with disruption, primarily focusing on creating business strategies and developing leadership around digital, social, and emerging technologies. An analyst since 1999, and having seen business, society, and the world undergo seismic changes over the last 18 years, she’s driven to create research and thought leadership that helps to bring greater clarity and inspire audacious actions.

The interview is hosted by Greg Mortona corporate strategy and growth development specialist and Chief Executive Officer of the Northern California HR Association.

Q: You talk about the seismic changes that have recently occurred in the workplace. Besides the obvious impacts of technology, virtual work, and social media, what’s a change you are observing that most people are underestimating? 

A: One of the biggest overlooked opportunities is thinking about the employee experience, as opposed to employee engagement. Employee experience is when you look at a situation through the eyes of the employee, and focus on how the day-to-day experience creates a deeper relationship between the organization and employees. This is a significant shift for HR who must shift from managing transactions (recruiting, hiring, evaluations) and risk mitigation (training and compliance) to nurturing relationships. Technologies makes this easier but it’s only when technology fades into the background, and the relationship work comes forward, that the experience becomes a differentiator to the employee.

Q: What is the biggest takeaway you hope readers get from The Engaged Leader?[i]

A: Relationships form the foundation for leadership and I hope that by reading the book, people understand that digital channels must be part of the repertoire of skills leaders use to develop relationships. My hope is that readers are inspired to hit the pause button on their busy day and take a few minutes to reflect on how they need to be better engaged — even if it means simply listening to the people crucial to the achievement of their goals.

Q: We’re getting ready for our 2nd Annual HR TechXpo which last year was quite an exciting event showcasing the intersection of HR and Technology. You have talked to hundreds of providers, so are probably not easily wowed. What are one or two technological features you have seen in HR solutions that have knocked your socks off?

A: I’m excited to see SaaS-based strategy planning and execution tools getting traction in the market from companies like StrategyBlocks and Cascade. The software makes explicit and transparent the strategic plan of the organization, so that everyone across the organization is connected to the strategy. This means it’s clear how what you do every day impacts the long term strategy. It takes the idea of “connected workforce” and gives it a direction and objective, where the purpose of the connection is a strategic objective. This is exciting for HR because it ties together HR functions (workforce management, performance evaluation) and ties it directly to strategy and business outcomes.

You can find Charlene Li on LinkedIn and on Twitter.

You can find Greg Morton on LinkedIn or on Twitter.

[i] Charlene Li. The Engaged Leader: A Strategy for Your Digital Transformation – Wharton Digital Press, 2015

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2nd Annual HR TechXpo will take place on August 25, 2017 in Hilton Union Square, San Francisco.

The HR Tech Weekly® readers get a free registration! Enter promo code hrtechweekly at time of checkout when you register here: http://hrtechxpo.com/register.

Please use #HRTechXpo to share the news about this exciting event showcasing the intersection of HR and Technology.

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Source: CEO’s Corner: Charlene Li on Technology and Employee Experience

Give Your HR Department a Boost with SMS Texting

Give Your HR Department a Boost with SMS Texting

Insert Your Design Here

When you implement SMS texting for HR departments, you will see how powerful this tool is for recruiting and training. With the ability to reach employees and potential recruits in an instant, text messaging has many useful applications. In a competitive business world, you need to give your HR department an edge when it comes to finding the best employees for your agency. Through the use of automated SMS, the process of recruitment will be revolutionized.

Send Updated Information to Jobseekers

Keywords are the best way to advertise jobs within your company on job boards. This gives you permission to send marketing texts to those that have signed up by keyword to learn more about the jobs you have advertised. Whenever there is a new position, you can send out a text to those people already want to work for you. When you have new information to share or a job that just opened up, a quick text to potential employees can help you fill the void faster.

Collect Information Through Text Messaging

Embedded links are simple to send through text messaging. Once a candidate is interested in a job, you can send out a link so that you can get the information you need to process their application further. This process can be automated, which will reduce the amount of time your HR employees have to spend on collecting applications and ensuring they are complete. Your HR department can focus on less tedious tasks, and the process of gathering applications will be streamlined.

Set Up New Employees for Work

Once you hire an employee, getting them ready to work on their first day takes some paperwork. You can get your employee setup to work by utilizing SMS texting to share information. You can even send out an offer for a job through texting, or you can ask for additional paperwork to be filled out. When you have employees who will need computer access, a phone line and email set up, this can all be done ahead of time and you can inform them through text messaging.

Organize Interviews, Meetings or Trainings Through Text Messaging

When you use text messaging to contact a potential employee for an interview, it can become much easier to schedule. If you have a large group of people you need to gather together for an important meeting, a quick text message to attendees can simplify scheduling. When employees have to attend a necessary training, a quick reminder text to let your staff know the training is about to begin can ensure that your staff are properly trained. For scheduling and reminder purposes, SMS texting is an essential tool to streamline communication within your company.

SMS Texting to Communicate with Everyone in the Company

It’s easy to reach your employees when you implement SMS texting for your company. Most of your employees will have a cell phone that can receive texts, and most text messages are read within three minutes. Whether you have a weather emergency and you need to close, or there is a security risk on the property, you’ll be able to reach your employees right away through text messaging.

Text messaging allows your HR department to have an edge when it comes to recruitment and communication. Through SMS texting, you will be able to provide information to new recruits, and make sure that all necessary employees are reminded of training. To streamline communication, SMS texting is the key.

About the Author:

Ken Rhie, CEO of Trumpia

Ken Rhie is the CEO of Trumpia, which earned a reputation as the most complete SMS solution including user-friendly user interface and API for mobile engagement, Smart Targeting, advanced automation, enterprise, and cross-channel features for both mass texting and landline texting use cases. Mr. Rhie holds an MBA degree from Harvard Business School. He has over 30 years of experience in the software, internet, and mobile communications industries.


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Technology training future proofs the business as well as the HR professional

Technology training future proofs the business as well as the HR professional

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Increasingly, professional bodies are acknowledging that technology is a key driver behind the HR profession’s evolution.

The emphasis on professional development through technology training shows an acceptance of the real pressures the sector faces, and the need to develop building blocks for meeting future expectations.

Analysing data collection in, say, the recruitment field, is elevating HR’s importance to the business – offering insights on a scale reserved for the marketing and sales teams traditionally. In the future we’ll probably see greater data analysis as a key HR function, rather than a sideline matter, as it sometimes can be now.

Systems currently provided over the internet are automating many tasks that used to take up a lot of HR time, triggering legally required actions, chasing up performance review reports, updating personnel details, making sure professional expectations are communicated and accepted, training arranged, holidays booked appropriately, and so on.

All this is freeing up the HR team to concentrate on the areas of their work that could be seen as having a higher value to the organisation, such as effective recruitment, higher retention of good staff, and managing employees more effectively when things go wrong. Technology is helping here as well. It can ensure sure the way applicants first come into contact with the organisation conforms to the branded experience those orgainisations offer across all their access points. Technology is automating the creation of reports on most HR cost implications, providing visibility on everything from right to work, to staff hours and holidays owed.

The general business environment is one in which HR sees increased legal responsibilities and higher workloads, but, along with every other business function, is pressured to keep costs down. Technology is proving to be the key asset in delivering on these difficult expectations.

So, sparing HR team members for a day while they train up on new technology is going to prove a valuable investment, not just because it future proofs an individual’s employability, but also because it embeds the right skills to future proof the company.

In the case of CIPHR, the Continuing Professional Development Standards Office (CPD) has assessed and accredited each one of our training courses. Since June this year, all CIPHR courses count toward 5.5 hours of formal continuing professional development required by professional bodies, institutes and employers.

This direction of travel bodes well for the whole HR sector, encouraging professionals to keep their tech skills up to date, and raise the  value of HR in the eyes of the C-suite.

For more information about our training courses, take a look here:

http://www.ciphr.com/services/training-course-outlines

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4 Ways Technology Is Changing Recruiting

4 Ways Technology Is Changing Recruiting

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Interest in HR tech has never been higher. According to CB Insights, there were over 350 deals and approximately $1.96B invested in HR tech startups in 2016 alone.

Today’s workplaces are being transformed by technology. HR tech specifically is automating and streamlining manual HR practices to become more efficient, cost-effective, and high-performing.

Here are four promising applications of technology that are helping to solve the biggest challenges in recruiting and hiring.

AI for recruiting

Industry statistics estimate 75 percent of resumes received for a role are screened out. This adds up to the hundreds of hours a recruiter wastes reading unqualified resumes per year.

As one of recruiting’s biggest bottlenecks, resume screening is in dire need of better tools to help recruiters manage their time more effectively.

This is why AI for recruiting is the biggest topic in HR tech right now. AI and recruiting are a natural fit because AI requires a lot of data to learn and large companies often have millions of resumes in their ATS.

Recruiting software that uses artificial intelligence can automate the screening process by learning the experience, skills, and qualifications required for the job and then shortlisting, ranking, and grading new candidates who match the requirements (e.g., from A to D).

This type of AI recruiting software can also be used to source candidates from external databases such as Indeed and CareerBuilder or find previous candidates in your existing ATS database by applying the same learning ability to match candidates to an open req.

By automating the manual processes of resume screening and candidate matching, companies who use AI recruiting software have reduced their screening costs by 75%.

Automation for candidate scheduling and outreach

According to SHRM, the average time to fill is 41 days. With LinkedIn reporting hiring volume is up 11% this year but only 26% of recruiting teams growing in headcount, interest in recruitment automation is only getting get stronger.

Today more than ever, finding top talent will depend on a recruiter’s ability to intelligently automate their workflow.

Recruitment automation can enhance a human recruiter’s capabilities in multiple ways. Low hanging fruit include automating your candidate outreach with tools that allow you to auto-email and auto-text interview requests to candidates your screening tool identifies as good matches (e.g., all candidates graded as an A).

These outreach automation tools help recruiters reduce their time to fill by integrating with major email and calendar providers and automatically finding time slots when the candidate and the interviewer are all free to meet.

VR for job testing and training

Another technology getting a lot of attention is Virtual reality (VR). VR is a realistic simulation of a three-dimensional environment that you control with your body movements.

A survey by Universum found that while 3% of people use VR currently, about 30% think that it will transform their workplace in the next ten years.

The most promising applications for VR in HR are candidate testing and training. Employers can use VR technology to create more realistic job tests to assess a candidate’s skills and personality. For example, a realistic simulation that tests a candidate’s social skills and problem solving abilities when dealing with an unhappy customer.

A survey by Korn Ferry found that 39% of employers state new hires leave within their first year because the role was not what they expected. VR could be an intriguing tool to help reduce employee turnover by provide candidates with a more realistic preview of what a day on the job would look like and get a better sense of the company culture.

The same technology can be used during new hires’ onboarding and training process. High-stakes environments such as hospital trauma bays are already employing VR technology to train residents.  

Wearable tech for engagement and productivity

According to Deloitte, one of 2017’s biggest HR trends is employee engagement. To help improve engagement and productivity, employers are starting to use wearable tech that tracks employees’ behaviors to learn more about how they communicate and interact at work.

Wearable tech such as digital employee badges are being used by companies such as as Microsoft and the Boston Consulting Group to track employees’ physical office movements, who they talk to, and the amount of time they spend talking to others.

These types of wearable tech collects data to provide employers insights to help optimize their physical office spaces, understand their employees’ communication styles, and manage team dynamics. The hope is these insights can help managers identify their employees’ needs and re-organize teams for better collaboration.

In the future, wearable tech may be used in the recruiting process to provide insights into a candidate’s personality and emotions during a pre-screen or interview.

About the Author:

Ji-A Min, Head Data Scientist at Ideal

Ji-A Min is the Head Data Scientist at Ideal, software that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to automate time-consuming, repetitive tasks and quickly move top candidates through the recruiting funnel.

Ideal’s AI can instantly screen and shortlist new candidates, uncover strong past candidates that are a great fit for a new role, and initiate candidate contact – all within your existing ATS. Learn more at Ideal.com.

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Enhance Engagement and Retention with People Analytics

Enhance Engagement and Retention with People Analytics

Employee Group

An organization that provides top wages and benefits loses a great employee to a competitor for no apparent reason. We can’t stop employees from leaving unless we have a plan to make them stay.

“Retention is the single most important thing for growth” – Alex Shultz (VP Growth, Facebook)

What is the biggest and most intractable restraint to growth faced by companies doing business today? For many organizations, it’s the lack of appropriate talent. The reason: As more organizations have expanded their operations, the need for talent has skyrocketed. But there isn’t enough skilled labor to fill the demand. As a result, one risks losing the talent to other organizations. And with so many companies drawing on a limited talent pool, the competition is fierce.

Glassdoor’s statistical analysis reveals top three factors that matter most for employee retention.

  • Company culture
  • Employee salary
  • Stagnating for long periods of time in the same job

By examining the survey responses of more than 100,000 employees in numerous organizations, Gallup also discovered common themes among the reasons employees chose to remain with a company or to leave it. The reasons employees chose to stay with a company included the following:

  • I feel my job is important to the company.
  • My supervisor cares about me and gives me regular feedback.
  • I know my job expectations.
  • My opinions count.
  • I have opportunity to do my best work every day.
  • My career development is encouraged.

All the above reasons are part of what is often known is “engagement”. Organizations, or teams with high levels of employee engagement score high in most if not all of these. Higher engagement levels not only significantly affect employee retention, productivity and loyalty, but are also a key link to customer satisfaction, company reputation and overall stakeholder value.

OWEN Analytics, who is are providing AI-based people solutions have developed a robust and comprehensive methodology to measure and enhance retention. They run quick pulse surveys that are a combination of “ME” questions (My opinions count), and “WE” questions (I would like to appreciate the following individuals for helping me in my day-to-day work). Open feedback questions are interspersed as well to understand sentiment and key issues.

This helps understand engagement drivers not only from an individual employee perspective, but also from a team dynamics perspective. After all, our engagement with the organization is actually our engagement with the people in the organization – hence understanding those relationships is critical in better understanding attrition. This is the science of ONA (Organization Network Analysis). The example below illustrates how ONA can be used to understand team dynamics in a pharmaceutical sales organization.

01

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Clearly, the more cohesive teams have better performance and lower attrition.

Now that we have looked at engagement comprehensively, we need to look at what other factors drive employee turnover, as shown below:

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As per Deloitte, moving beyond the analysis of employee engagement and retention, analytics and AI have come together, giving companies a much more detailed view of management and operational issues to improve operational performance.

Exploring People Analytics

People Analytics, a discipline that started as a small technical group that analyzed engagement and retention, has now gone mainstream as per Deloitte. Organizations are redesigning their technical analytics groups to build out digitally powered enterprise analytics solutions.

OWEN Analytics specializes in helping organizations improve retention using AI driven techniques. As per OWEN, “Machine learning predictions can be sufficiently accurate and thus very effective in enabling targeted interventions for retaining high risk employees. However, using such techniques requires significant expertise in developing predictive models and experience in interpreting the outputs.

HR leaders and aspiring analysts needn’t be disheartened though. One can start with some very simple analyses using nothing more than basic Excel and develop reasonably good retention strategies” Read their blog here: Manage attrition using simple analytics.

OWEN uses a systematic retention approach to understand, predict and drive necessary actions.

04

Predictive models are developed using various Machine Learning algorithms (e.g. Decision Trees, Random Forests, Logistic Regression, Support Vector Machines and Artificial Neural Networks) and best fit algorithm based on the accuracy and business context selected to predict flight risk.

Once the predictions are drivers are available, simple action planning templates to develop and track interventions are used to retain high potential employees.

Retention Challenge

The retention challenge is the result of increasing job mobility in the global knowledge economy where workers average six employers over the course of a career, coupled with the baby boomer retirement “brain drain” and a smaller generation of workers entering their prime working age during this time. It is occurring in all types of organizations across all management levels. This study empirically investigates whether the impact of an organization’s strategic orientation toward knowledge management, the learning culture it supports, and specific human resource practices impact knowledge worker retention and organization performance.

The Eight Elements of the High-Retention Organization as per SAS Institute

  • Clear Sense of Direction and Purpose
  • Caring Management
  • Flexible Benefits and Schedule Adapted to the Needs of the Individual
  • Open Communication
  • A Charged Work Environment
  • Performance Management
  • Recognition and Reward
  • Training and Development

As per Asia – Pacific Journal of Research, preventing turnover is a wise step to implement because it saves money, time, and effort. The company should spend a considerable effort and time to prevent turnover. It is better for an organization to keep experienced and productive employees than to hire new ones. It should invest in its employees through training programs, creating a good hiring process, and engrain them with strong organizational vision. To effectively solve turnover problems, every company needs to address the causes of the turnover. The causes of turnover might not be the same for every company. Below are the most common and affecting factors for preventing turnover.

It’s no more a secret that People Analytics plays a vital role for organizations in dealing with challenges of employee engagement and retention.

About the Authors:

Soumyasanto Sen — Blogger, Speaker and Evangelist in HR Technologies. Engaging with OWEN Analytics.

Professional Advisor, Consultant, Investor in HR Tech. Having 12+ years of experience focusing on Strategies, People Analytics, Cloud, UX, Security, Integration and Entrepreneurship in Digital HR Transformation.

Tej Mehta — Founder & CEO of OWEN Analytics.

Entrepreneur, advisor, student of social sciences. Founded i-Cube as an intersection of analytics and social sciences. Previously, as Vice President with Seabury Group, led strategy and operational transformation programs across several clients in the airline and aerospace industries. Aeronautical engineer, MBA from University of Southern California.


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Global Study Reveals Businesses and Countries Vulnerable Due to Shortage of Cybersecurity Talent

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Intel Corporation
2200 Mission College Blvd.
Santa Clara, CA 95054-1549

Global Study Reveals Businesses and Countries Vulnerable Due to Shortage of Cybersecurity Talent

82 Percent of IT Professionals Confirm Shortfall in Cybersecurity Workforce 

News Highlights:

  • New report by Intel Security and CSIS reveals current cybersecurity talent crisis
  • Cybersecurity skills shortage is worse than talent deficits in other IT professions.
  • Shortage in cybersecurity skills is responsible for significant damages.
  • Talent shortage is largest for individuals with highly technical skills.
  • Hands-on training and practical training are perceived as better ways to develop skills than through traditional education resources.

Dubai, United Arab Emirates – August 01, 2016 – Intel Security, in partnership with the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), recently released Hacking the Skills Shortage, a global report outlining the talent shortage crisis impacting the cybersecurity industry across both companies and nations. A majority of respondents (82 percent) admit to a shortage of cybersecurity skills, with 71 percent of respondents citing this shortage as responsible for direct and measurable damage to organizations whose lack of talent makes them more desirable hacking targets.

“A shortage of people with cybersecurity skills results in direct damage to companies, including the loss of proprietary data and IP,” said James A Lewis, senior vice president and director of the Strategic Technologies Program at CSIS. “This is a global problem; a majority of respondents in all countries surveyed could link their workforce shortage to damage to their organization.”

Despite 1 in 4 respondents confirming their organizations have lost proprietary data as a result of their cybersecurity skills gap, there are no signs of this workforce shortage abating in the near-term. Respondents surveyed estimate an average of 15 percent of cybersecurity positions in their company will go unfilled by 2020. With the increase in cloud, mobile computing and the Internet of Things, as well as advanced targeted cyberattacks and cyberterrorism across the globe, the need for a stronger cybersecurity workforce is critical.

Raj Samani
Raj Samani, VP & CTO, EMEA, Intel Security

“The security industry has talked at length about how to address the storm of hacks and breaches, but government and the private sector haven’t brought enough urgency to solving the cybersecurity talent shortage,” said Raj Samani, VP & CTO, EMEA, Intel Security. “To address this workforce crisis, we need to foster new education models, accelerate the availability of training opportunities, and we need to deliver deeper automation so that talent is put to its best use on the frontline. Finally, we absolutely must diversify our ranks.”

The demand for cybersecurity professionals is outpacing the supply of qualified workers, with highly technical skills the most in need across all countries surveyed. In fact, skills such as intrusion detection, secure software development and attack mitigation were found to be far more valued than softer skills including collaboration, leadership and effective communication.

This report studies four dimensions that comprise the cybersecurity talent shortage, which include:

  1. Cybersecurity Spending: The size and growth of cybersecurity budgets reveals how countries and companies prioritize cybersecurity. Unsurprisingly, countries and industry sectors that spend more on cybersecurity are better placed to deal with the workforce shortage, which according to 71 percent of respondents, has resulted in direct and measurable damage to their organization’s security networks.
  2. Education and Training: Only 23 percent of respondents say education programs are preparing students to enter the industry. This report reveals non-traditional methods of practical learning, such as hands-on training, gaming and technology exercises and hackathons, may be a more effective way to acquire and grow cybersecurity skills. More than half of respondents believe that the cybersecurity skills shortage is worse than talent deficits in other IT professions, placing an emphasis on continuous education and training opportunities.
  3. Employer Dynamics: While salary is unsurprisingly the top motivating factor in recruitment, other incentives are important in recruiting and retaining top talent, such as training, growth opportunities and reputation of the employer’s IT department. Almost half of respondents cite lack of training or qualification sponsorship as common reasons for talent departure.

Recommendations for Moving Forward:

  • Redefine minimum credentials for entry-level cybersecurity jobs: accept non-traditional sources of education
  • Diversify the cybersecurity field
  • Provide more opportunities for external training
  • Identify technology that can provide intelligent security automation
  • Collect attack data and develop better metrics to quickly identify threats

For more information on these findings, along with Intel Security’s proposed recommendations, read the full report: Hacking the Skills Shortage: A study of the international shortage in cybersecurity skills.

About Intel Security:

Intel Security, with its McAfee product line, is dedicated to making the digital world safer and more secure for everyone. Intel Security is a division of Intel Corporation. Learn more at www.intelsecurity.com.

Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.

*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

Contacts:

Vernon SaldanhaVernon Saldanha

Procre8 (on behalf of Intel Security)

vernon@procre8.biz

 

5 Reasons Why Big Data Analytics Degrees Are Worth It

Careers in Big Data

Due in large part to the rapid growth of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, big data analytics is approaching new heights. Students who pursue a degree in big data analytics learn how to effectively analyze large sets of data and identify patterns, connections and other pertinent details revealed by data. Companies are increasingly turning to data analytics to harness customer insights, and ultimately, produce better business decisions. As a result, big data analysts are in high demand and the data analytics field is showing no signs of slowing down. Here are five reasons why earning a degree in big data analytics pays off.

The Thriving Field

More and more universities are offering degrees in big data analytics to adjust to the growing job demand and close the skills gap, or in other words, produce more employable talent who can glean useful insights from big data. With massive amounts of data being produced daily, it’s no wonder why data analysts are in such high demand. Large corporations, such as Microsoft and IBM, analyze and leverage data in order to extract more information about clients. IBM, for example, divides clients by certain commonalities—such as industry, company size and revenue—to better segment prospects and create highly effective marketing campaigns.

A Generous Earning Potential

A career in big data is a lucrative career choice, with the national average salary for data-related careers hovering in the mid-90s (PayScale). Additionally, scientific and technical services, information technologies, retail, sustainability and professional services are often the leading industries in terms of having the most job openings in big data analytics.

Highly Rewarding for Business and Employees

Big data analysts typically wear several hats within an organization, but they focus on one key principle: to help companies make better business decisions by revealing useful insights from data. As a result, this is a highly esteemed position for any business professional, and one that is commonly cited as being both rewarding and satisfying.

Real-World Training and Preparation

Improvements in programming technology and graph databases, such as Neo4j, are continuing to transform the data analytics field and how data can be used. Companies around the world are recognizing more and more benefits of data analysis, and rely heavily on big data analysts to execute the job. As a result, many of the nation’s top engineering colleges are putting more emphasis on real-world experience inside the classroom, by supplementing classwork with hands-on training and lab work.

Join an Elite Pool of Talent

In order to succeed in a big data analytics career, it’s essential to have a deep understanding of science and mathematics—but that’s not all. The field also incorporates advanced knowledge of decision analysis and data mining, and it requires critical thinking and problem-solving to truly understand the information at hand. With this in mind, students can expect to work alongside some of the brightest and most talented peers. By collaborating with these individuals, students can gain a new perspective and understanding of complex topics.

For students looking for a career with a promising future, earning a degree in big data analytics is certainly a great option; big data analytics is a field with unlimited potential for growth and discovery.

About the Author

Lauren WillisonAs the Director of Admissions at Florida Polytechnic University, Lauren Willison is responsible for supporting the Vice Provost of Enrollment in managing recruitment efforts. She develops and coordinates on- and off-campus events, as well as manages the campus visit experience.


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What Organizations Need to Understand About Their Millennial Workforce

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Whiny, impatient, hard-to-please, disloyal – these are some of the adjectives associated with millennials at the workplace. This generation born between 1980 and 1996 has also been identified as job hoppers and the hardest to retain. Companies of all kinds are obsessed with understanding millennials better. The Global Human Capital Trends Report, 2016 also stated the rise of millennial workforce as a demographic upheaval, which is a major force of global change in the talent landscape.

The truth is – this particular lot of the population has more or less the same needs as their older generations. In fact, a study by IBM debunked most of the myths associated with millennials. It showed that they actually want the same things from their workplace like their older generations (except for a few differences in matters such as retirement plans!).

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But why are they still hopping jobs? 21% of millennial workers had left their jobs in the last year to do something else. Gallup has found that millennials struggle to find good jobs that engage them. In fact, millennials are the generation with the highest rates of unemployment and underemployment in the US. The problem of engagement is even severe with only 29% of employed millennials being engaged at work.

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The only explanation to this is that they are clearly not getting what they want. It’s not that the millennials have a completely different view of the world as compared to the older generations, or are asking for too much. With the digital wave setting in and technology being readily available to this generation, organizations need to understand what exactly is expected out of them.

This is extremely critical as the presence of millennials in the US is huge. They are going to make up 40% of the workforce by 2020 and 75% by 2025 (as per the U.S. Bureau of Statistics project). If such a major part of a generation is not engaged at work, the cost of it will also be huge! As per Gallup, millennial turnover costs the U.S, economy $30.5 billion annually. At the same time, 60% of millennials are open to new job opportunities – this basically means that for businesses, half of their millennial workforce doesn’t see a future with them.

As per Gallup, the following things set millennials apart from other generations:

  1. They really care about their job roles and view them as stepping stones and growth opportunities to their larger goals. 52% of millennials cite career progression as their first priority, followed by competitive salaries (PwC).
  2. They are deeply committed to what they do professionally.
  3. They do not want to work for bosses, but for coaches who invest and contribute to their personal and professional development.
  4. They want more than free beers and a fun workplace as opposed to Baby Boomers and GenXers – they need to be convinced why and how an organization will help them learn, grow and develop and further their careers.
  5. They want an emotional and behavioral connection with their jobs.
  6. They want a high level of well-being – be able to spend on things that they want, rather on things they should have. Work life balance is key for them and they aren’t getting it. As per a PwC research 28% of millennial respondents said that their work life balance was worse than they expected before joining.

What Millennials Want from Performance Management

Performance management is a very critical area for most companies to crack as it defines the relationship between a manager and an employee. Millennials want coaches over bosses, and they can only stick to an organization that gives them managers who would potentially invest and contribute to their personal and professional growth. Like any relationship to succeed, communication is crucial here as well. Millennials are hungry for frequent and consistent communication and feedback from their managers. Level of manager involvement is directly proportional to the level of engagement that a millennial employee might have:

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Lack of feedback – The reason for disengagement in this regard is also clear with statistics, as only 21% of millennials meet their managers on a weekly basis (Gallup). The exchange of feedback is low. Regular meetings, along with frequent feedback can lead to more engagement and better performance for teams as well as companies as a whole. Performance management needs to be a process spread over a year, rather than a year end discussion which focuses on assigning a number, which clearly is not holistic in nature.

Lack of flexible options – Along with feedback, millennials also wants flexibility at their workplace and move beyond the 9 to 5 cycle of drudgery. 77% of millennials say that flexible work hours are key to boosting productivity (Gallup). They love the idea of being able to work from any location with technology easily available – 39% of millennials believe that more options to work remotely would result in higher productivity.

Leadership and Millennials

89% of organizations cite leadership as one of their top challenges.

~ Global Human Capital Trends Report , 2016

Millennials bring high expectations to a workplace and they look for a recipe that gives them a rewarding, purposeful work experience, combined with constant learning and development opportunities that steers their career progression. Leaders and people managers are the most important stakeholders for driving engagement. HR managers should support leaders in creating an engaged environment at workplace. Leaders who motivate and coach their subordinates, who in turn motivate and engage theirs, are a key ingredient in creating a culture of engagement that sustains business results in a highly dynamic global environment. HR managers should demonstrate investment in helping leaders focus on building skills, empowering their colleagues as well as motivate individuals to ensure that they drive their own engagement.

In the Deloitte Millennial Survey 2016, 39 % of millennial respondents pointed to leadership as one of the most sought after aspects at the workplace. They also believe that businesses are not doing enough to bridge the gap and ensure that a new generation of business leaders is created. The survey also revealed that 71% of those millennials who are likely to leave their current company in the next two years are unhappy with how their leadership skills are being developed.

As per the Global Human Capital Trends report 2016, only 7% of surveyed respondents reported to have accelerated leadership programs for millennials. 28% of respondents reported weak or very weak leadership pipelines. And 21% of companies have no leadership programs at all! Many organizations are still finding it difficult to identify potential leaders and develop them, despite heavy investment being done to achieve the same.

On-the-job Training Opportunities

30% of executives see learning as the primary driver of employee development in the Global Human Capital Trends Report, 2016. Professional growth within the company is possible through learning and customized and blended training programs – which is something the young workforce is desperately looking for. Millennials have reported that they will move elsewhere if employers fail to provide learning opportunities to them. What needs to be done here is that employees need to be viewed as customers who long for satisfaction, rather than being treated as students who are pressurized into traditional classroom methodologies. This is the generation who loves exploiting the power of technology and mobile devices, and if learning programs are not aligned with these wants, they are most likely to leave that organization.

Millennials and other young employees have grown in a self-directed learning environment and have been exposed to the internet from an early stage. In fact, 85% of millennials access internet from their phones. They get most of the information they need from their mobile devices and 93% of millennials use social media to connect with their friends and family, as opposed to 84% in older generations. This is why they expect access to dynamic learning opportunities that fit their individual needs and schedules, as well as suit their talent and interests.

The digital wave has hit the world and the millennials want to take advantage of it. They want to be able to be on the move and work remotely. In fact, as per a study by PWC, 41% of miilennials prefer to communicate electronically at work than face to face or even over telephone.

What Organizations Need to Do

  • Help millennials grow: Only 28 percent of millennials feel that their current organizations are making ‘full use’ of the skills they currently have to offer (Deloitte Millennial Survey, 2016).

Managers need to really understand the personal and professional goals of millennials. Understand the areas that interest these passionate people and offer them opportunities in the same.

  • Mentoring: As per the Deloitte Millennial Survey, 2016, among those millennials who have somebody acting as a mentor, 83% are satisfied with this aspect of their working lives.

Millennials want and value frequent feedback unlike annual reviews that dominated in the past. They are more than willing to know how they are doing on a regular basis and expect real time feedback. Organizations need to make continuous feedback a major part of their engagement strategy.

  • Encourage learning: Millennials are hungry for knowledge and they want to experience as much as training as possible. Organizations need to focus deeply on this aspect and build and measure the effectiveness of learning programs, along with mentoring programs. Technology plays a key role here as it allows L&D professionals to play with the way they want training to happen, and also retain the interest of this young lot by providing them with innovative learning options. A lot of technological innovations have come up that have helped organizations train their staff as well as measure the effectiveness of their programs. Capabiliti by Qustn is one such product that has helped L&D professionals connect learning with their business goals. See how.
  • Focus on culture over profit: Millennials give more importance to people and culture over monetary aspects. Corporate values that are shared with and believed by millennials also promote loyalty—particularly when employers demonstrate a strong sense of company purpose beyond financial success. Those likely to remain longest share their organization’s values, and are more satisfied with its sense of purpose and support of professional development.
  • Flexible options: Currently, millennials lack flexible options as 77% wish to have greater mobile connectivity, such as via tablets and smartphones (Deloitte Millennial Survey, 2016). Lack of remote working options is also serving as the greatest gap between current supply and demand surrounds the issue of remote working—fully 75 percent would like to start to, or more frequently, work from home or other locations where they feel more productive. If organizations work around providing such options to millennials, it will definitely increase their levels of satisfaction and boost productivity.

About the Author

Bhaswati BhattacharrayaBhaswati is a Product Specialist at Capabiliti, a mobile-first training and engagement solution for enterprises. Passionate about Economics, Bhaswati also loves storytelling. She has a keen interest in start-ups, food and travel. In her ‘me time’ she picks up fiction novels, tries different cuisines or explores routes to less traveled places on the world map. Follow her on Twitter at @Bhaswatibh


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