How to Maintain a Positive Team Spirit

There are just some periods that you can’t wait for the workday to be over – everyone’s gloomy, tasks are barely being carried out, and the dials on the clock on the office wall seem to have fallen into a stupor so it might need to be replaced with a digital one.  

Naturally, it is not realistic to expect employees to be enthusiastic at all times but a general positive spirit even on slow days is vital for the business to thrive. The happiness and satisfaction of employees are key to their productivity. With that in mind, here are some suggestions on how to foster a positive spirit among your employees.

Organize events and workshops

Events and workshops serve the purpose of facilitating bonding outside of work. The social events that you organize don’t have to be grand, it is enough to get people together for a casual few hours of playing a quiz. To motivate them to collaborate outside of work, escape rooms might be a good option since everyone will get the chance to contribute to the team.

As for workshops, your employees will probably look forward to learning a new skill without the stress of being evaluated at all times. Depending on the type of skill, you can also promote group work and in general, entice socialization which is not strictly related to work topics. Also, you shouldn’t make workshops obligatory since that would defeat the purpose.

Nurture life and work balance

To be able to give their best at work, the employees need to leave their personal problems behind when they enter the office, as well as their business-related issues at work, unless absolutely necessary. So, it is advisable to promote the importance of this balance and provide them with adequate working conditions and the right tools to aid them in their daily tasks.

Another thing you can do for them is to find ways to decrease the amount of stress in the office. For instance, animal-shaped branded stress balls can become a part of the office culture so that every time employees feel stress accumulating, they can take it out on a frog-shaped ball instead of a co-worker. Also, you could introduce darts, so they can imagine the face of the person that gets on their nerves while they aim for the dartboard. 

Be open with praise

Employees who work at the same position for some time, no matter how good they are at their job, tend to embrace routine and forget about how much they contribute. This is why it is crucial to air your praise openly and make sure that everyone knows if an employee is doing a good job or has done something worth lauding. 

If an employee is constantly showing remarkable results, then praising them in public will not suffice. You could consider rewarding that worker in some manner and the reward can be anything from working from your office for a day to an additional day off or a dinner for two at some restaurant. Whichever type of reward you choose, it is essential you honor it since you will not maintain a positive spirit or a reputation if you don’t live up to your promises.

Promote an atmosphere of honesty

The communication flow between you and your employees can be improved if you insist on honesty. An environment of mutual respect, where people feel relaxed enough to share their opinions and ideas is an ideal atmosphere to work in. Of course, the emphasis shouldn’t only be on honesty, but also respect since there is quite a difference between being direct and being rude.

You can establish a practice of preventing dishonest behavior by sanctioning it immediately which will send a firm message about honesty and distinguishing right from wrong. As far as mistakes go, in an atmosphere you are trying to achieve, it is best to address them straight away but not in the form of punishment since that would have the opposite effect and would cultivate dishonesty.

Conclusion

The most obvious reason people are put into teams when working on the same project is the need for communication and collaboration since everyone’s got a piece of a puzzle which needs to fit into the grand scheme. However, another reason for grouping employees is mutual support which develops as a natural result of sharing a task.

Whenever someone is down, there is a co-worker willing to help and that is the real beauty of working together. In any team, there will always be at least one person who carries a spark of positivity and who will share that positive energy on the rest of the team.

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Teamwork: Lessons from Apple, Yahoo and LinkedIn

Learn valuable lessons on teamwork from leading companies such as Apple, Yahoo and LinkedIn!

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Effective teamwork: The key to success and growth

Effective teamwork is the secret behind the growth and success of the most successful companies in the world. Teamwork is an incredibly important ingredient of the ‘successful business’ recipe.

Take companies such as Apple, Yahoo and LinkedIn for example. All of these companies are well aware of the importance of teamwork. They work hard to promote teamwork and encourage collaboration among their employees.

What can we learn from these crazy successful companies and how they view and foster teamwork?

Lessons on teamwork from Apple, Yahoo and LinkedIn

Here are some valuable lessons on teamwork from Apple, Yahoo and LinkedIn:

Lesson #1: Highlight the importance of teamwork

“Great things in business are never done by one person; they’re done by a team of people.”

– Steve Jobs, Chairman, CEO and co-founder of Apple

“No matter how brilliant your mind or strategy, if you’re playing a solo game, you’ll always lose out to a team.”

– Reid Hoffman, Co-founder and former executive chairman of LinkedIn

Key takeaway: Make teamwork one of your key companies values and continually work on promoting it.

Lesson #2: Teamwork starts at the top

“There is tremendous teamwork at the top of the company which filters down the teamwork through out of the company.”

– Steve Jobs, Chairman, CEO and co-founder of Apple

Key takeaway: Teamwork starts at the top and filters down through every layer of your company. If you want your employees to foster team collaboration, model it form top.

Lesson #3: Trust is the key

“Teamwork is dependent on trusting the other folks to come through with their part without watching them all the time.”

– Steve Jobs, Chairman, CEO and co-founder of Apple

Key takeaway: Hire the best people and trust them to do their job. Team members will hold each other accountable.

Lesson #4: Teamwork leads to innovation

“When you need to innovate, you need collaboration.”

– Marissa Mayer, Former president and chief executive officer of Yahoo!

Key takeaway: If you want to find a new, creative solution for a certain problem, bring (different) people together. Diversity leads to innovation.

Lesson #5: Teamwork is a process

“Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.”

– Henry Ford, Founder of Ford Motor Company

Key takeaway: Teamwork is a continuous process. Team members must learn how to successfully communicate and work together.  

➡️ If you’re looking for more great tips on managing employees, check out our Short Leaderships Tips for Managers!

 

Highly Effective Tips for Business Success for Startups

Highly Effective Tips for Business Success for Startups

“Starting your own business is like riding a roller coaster. There are highs and lows and every turn you take is another twist. The lows are really low, but the highs can be really high. You have to be strong, keep your stomach tight, and ride along with the roller coaster that you started.” – Lindsay Manseau, Photographer and Entrepreneur

According to Problemio, there are over 28 million small businesses in the U.S. However, the problem is almost 50% of startups fail during the first year. And the chances of reaching the end of the road only increase with each year on the market.

But why do so many companies face the risk of failure? The answer is not so simple although it all comes down to the issues entrepreneurs haven’t anticipated. So in order to get acquainted with corporate requirements and preventing possible business threats, we offer you a list of highly effective tips to help you secure the startup success and enhanced growth.

Know Your Goals

One of the biggest reasons why small businesses fail is because they didn’t research market demands. Before anything else, entrepreneurs need to be familiar with the industry, target audience, and competition. Who is your perfect customer? How are your products or services different from the rest? What is the ultimate business objective? And is the time for launching your business right?

Offer People a Deal They Can’t Refuse    

When first starting out, it’s important to offer quality. The business should be built around consumers because they are the backbone of every successful brand. Instead of focusing on sales, research what people need in the moment and then invest and promote deals customers will prefer.

Don’t be Afraid to Outsource     

Outsourcing has become the industry standard. Nowadays, those who wish to reduce costs, enhance customer experiences with the business, increase productivity and improve the quality of products and services in general, turn to outsourcing. Outsourcing back office operations, front office processes and marketing business processes are the main and highly rewarding options startups should definitely include in their business plan once the company begins to gain a broader awareness.

Keep a Close Eye on Cash Flow

The major liability that can ruin both a small business and a large enterprise is cash flow. As according to Nelson, a real estate business owner,  you need to have a clear idea of where the money goes and why. The business expenditure should be aligned with the main objectives while retaining a portion for unplanned situations. In other words, keep in touch with your accountant and have backup cash reserves as a safety cushion in case of shortfalls.   

Surround Yourself with a Motivated Team

The employee expertise is equally important as their motivation to complete tasks on time. Look at your staff as a well-oiled machine working towards a common goal which is, you guessed it, business successes. However, don’t forget that they are also people with hopes and dreams. Meaning you need to treat them with respect, include them in every step of the way, and provide opportunities for further occupational growth.

Share Your Success

It’s crucial to be transparent with your employees and customers. People feel more related and open to entrepreneurs who are not afraid to share their successes stories. Not only that transparency could help you raise productivity, but it can also build the necessary trust between a business and its audience. Plus, exchanging stories and listening to other ideas provides a chance to learn something new and to form loyal relationships along the way.

Leverage Technology into Your Advantage

Automation is the key to optimizing business processes. Digital technology and mighty software solutions can help to prevent human errors, enhance collaboration across departments, and better engage consumers. The good news is that you can take advantage of free online programs and affordable systems specifically designed to support SMBs. Just be sure you are picking the right tool for your business. Identify areas within your company that consume a lot of time and effort and use them as references.     

Learn to Move On

Taking care of every single thing and micromanaging projects can be stressful and damaging for the business. Some mistakes are bound to happen but if you want to overcome bumps on the road, learn to move on and trust your team to efficiently complete tasks. To put it simply, learn from mistakes but don’t fixate on problems.

Meet Your Investors

The majority of startups require investments to kick the business off. If you can relate, it’s recommended to find out what investors prefer and where can you find them. Doing online research is a good start, but still, work your way up in the entrepreneurial community and get involved on social media platforms. But before you contact investors, try finding or getting in touch with your mentors. They can tell you if your idea needs some touch-ups and prep you with the essentials investors expect to get from thriving entrepreneurs.  

 

Final Thoughts

“What I learned from Rockefeller that’s off-the-hook important is: You need to know exactly where you stand in a business at all times. Measure everything, because everything that is measured and watched improves.” – Bob Parson, GoDaddy Founder

All you need to succeed is a strategic head and a passionate heart. You need to be aware of everything that’s going on with your business at every moment. However, that doesn’t mean you should be too controlling and focused on every single detail.

Also, once the company experience successes, try not to become greedy. Remember, if you build your business on knowledge, respect, and a well-designed strategy, you will diminish the risk of becoming just one of the businesses who couldn’t keep up with evolving market requirements. Good luck!

HR Challenge – Ensuring That Both The App and The Development Team Are Working As They Should

Forward Productivity

There are a lot of things which go into designing a software development team. Consider front-end designers, whose coding language handles the basic presentation of your company’s development project. Now consider backend developers, whose expertise is used for a variety of applications on a given page. Now consider mobile app developers, which has its own idiosyncrasies pertaining to compatibility.

Justifying everything together can be very difficult, and you need metrics which will help you to define that which works, and that which doesn’t. According to Stackify.com, when it comes to measuring software development team productivity, there are quite a few different schools of thought; one expert put it succinctly: “Working software is the primary measure of progress.”

Ideally, whatever solutions you bring to bear on your online solution, they should work as they’ve been designed to. In order to determine whether this is the case, as the experienced guys from Picnet like to emphasize – you’ll need to continuously test everything – both in the software development team and in the HR department.

In the development team, they mostly rely on load testing. If you’re not familiar, load testing is exactly what it sounds like: you’re stretching software to its limit to determine the “load” of activity it can handle. Ideally, it should be able to handle things several levels of magnitude higher than statistically traditional traffic. If you do well, you’re likely to have some spikes on occasion; you want to be prepared for them.

Employee Considerations

Still, even if you’ve got the absolute best software solutions around, if you don’t have the right team working with it, you’ll likely see productivity that is inferior to your business’s ability. If those who work on your software don’t have their “heart” in it, you may be leaving money on the table.

There is an old saying: the man who is lazy is a relative of the man who destroys. Basically, this saying is pointing out that a lack of diligence in work can be just as damaging as deliberate destruction. With tech people, you’ve really got to be careful with this. You want passionate, motivated individuals working for you. You don’t want lackluster, antisocial and egotistical techies who hold those that don’t think in programming languages as inferior to themselves.

Such individuals will design something which may work for a while, but should it have a tiny error that is transmitted through dint of simple human imperfection, getting them to fix that error may be like pulling teeth. The egotistical aspect of such an individual’s personality won’t allow them to admit they did something wrong until there is no other explanation for poor software activity.

The Right Team And The Right Numbers

Part of ensuring that your software runs as you intend means getting a design team who will take your instruction. You shouldn’t be having arguments. You’re the boss, even when you’re “wrong”, you’re “right”.

Finding such individuals may be easier said than done. If you’ve got multiple open positions and multiple viable candidates, you might hire two and set them into professional, “friendly” competition against one another within your business. This can facilitate motivation without you having to stand behind either and keep the candle lit, as it were.

Remember to ensure that mobile connectivity and utility are paramount in your forward software designs. This method of web connectivity defines modernity, and avoiding it will definitely hamper the effectiveness of any online solutions you’re able to acquire for your business.

Lastly, keep good numbers on everything. You’re looking for traffic increase that is progressively better, expanded clientele acquisition, and increasing profit. This should rise in a reliable way that you can build your budget around. The right software will help. The bad software will hamper you. Using good employees, keeping numbers, and finding techniques to motivate that are oblique as outlined earlier can definitely help you acquire the best software solutions.

Recognize Employee Achievements: 5 Ways how to give Positive Feedback | Featured Image

Recognize Employee Achievements: 5 Ways how to give Positive Feedback

Recognize Employee Achievements: 5 Ways how to give Positive Feedback | Main Image

Feedback shouldn’t only be given when there’s a problem. It’s also important to let your employees know they’re on the right track and that they’re valued within the company. Recognizing achievements can signal to other employees the types of skills that should be enhanced and behavior that should be replicated. For those of you who are uncomfortable giving positive feedback, following the right steps will help you to deliver honest recognition that doesn’t feel forced or insincere.

Putting positive feedback to the test

In his insightful Ted Talk “What makes us feel good about our work?”, behavioral economist Dan Ariely describes an experiment he conducted on the correlation between recognition and motivation. In the experiment people were offered declining amounts of money to circle pairs of identical letters on a sheet of paper. In the first scenario, people had to write their name on the paper. When they were finished, they handed it to an experimenter who quickly scanned the paper, said “aha” and placed it on a pile. In the second scenario, the participants did not write their name on the paper. When they were finished, the experimenter placed the paper on the pile without looking at it. In the final scenario, the experimenter put the sheets directly into a shredder.

The results showed that people in the first scenario ended up working for half as much money as the people in the third scenario. Watching their work being destroyed immediately was extremely demotivating, despite being offered money to do an easy task over and over again. Surprisingly, it turns out that the average stopping point for people in the second scenario was almost the same as those in the third. As Mr. Ariely explained, “Ignoring people’s performance was almost as bad as shredding it in front of their eyes.” Even just a simple acknowledgment from the experimenter had a marked impact on the subjects’ motivation.

Why is positive feedback important?

A common misconception is that motivation in the workplace is primarily based on monetary rewards. It’s not always possible to give your employees a raise every time they do well, and surprisingly it might not be the strongest incentive either. A 2013 study by Make Their Day and Badgeville revealed that 83% of employees surveyed found recognition for contributions to be more fulfilling than rewards and gifts. Another 88% believed praise from managers in particular was either very or extremely motivating.

Positive feedback lets your employees know that they’re valued by the company and is especially important for building confidence in newer employees. It’s also helpful to give positive feedback when an employee improves in an area they had previously had difficulty with, making it very useful as a follow up to constructive feedback.

Don’t forget that your top performers also need positive feedback. Many managers tend to neglect their top performers when it comes to feedback because they see it more as a tool for helping improve the performance of employees who are struggling. Recognizing them for their efforts and showing appreciation are important steps to retaining your top talent.

While creating a positive feedback culture starts with managers, encouraging your employees to give positive feedback to each other is the step that will diffuse and institutionalize the practice within the office. The Make Their Day/Badgeville study reported that 76% of respondents saw praise from peers as very or extremely motivating. Peer-to-peer feedback can inspire better interpersonal relationships between employees and boost team spirit.

How to give positive feedback:

  1. Be specific

Avoid generic comments like “good job!” Explain what your employee did in particular so they can learn what type of behavior they should keep up in future. Instead of saying “you’re a great team player” describe what they did and why you appreciated it. “The extra coaching you gave to the new recruits on the last project helped them to learn the appropriate procedures, and helped our department to reach our deadline on time.” This will also help managers who are uncomfortable giving positive feedback. If you stick with stating the facts and why you thought their performance deserved recognition you can avoid clichés.

  1. Timing

Timing is an important aspect of giving positive feedback. If you wait too long both you and the receiver might forget the details of their performance. This will undermine one of the main reasons for giving positive feedback: pointing out positive behavior so it can be encouraged and replicated. If you put it off for too long, when the employee finally receives appreciation for their work, so much time may have passed that it could feel more like an afterthought. If you don’t have time to speak with them straight away, send them a message or email. Letting the opportunity to give praise go by in some instances and not others can unintentionally create double standards.

  1. Get into the habit of giving feedback more frequently

Failing to recognize when your team has gone above and beyond can demotivate them. Not recognizing their efforts will tell them they simply met expectations. Getting into the habit of giving positive feedback more often will motivate your employees to achieve more.

Be careful not to base positive feedback exclusively on results. Sometimes even if an employee puts forth their best effort, a project could fall through due to funding, a client may decide to go in a different direction, etc. It’s at these times that positive feedback can be most effective in counteracting the demotivating feeling your employee may be experiencing after not seeing their efforts materialize.

  1. Set goals and new challenges

Even if you only have positive feedback to give, you should encourage your employees to continue improving by helping them set goals and new challenges. This is especially important for top performers who may become demotivated if they don’t feel they’re developing or being challenged.

Start by asking them if they have any professional goals or objectives they’d like to accomplish in the next few months, or in the next few years. Consider how these short and long term goals could fit with the company’s objectives. Then offer support finding ways they could achieve these goals, for example, taking on a stretch assignment or participating in a training course. Keep in mind that the goals you’re setting together should be challenging but achievable, and won’t cut into your employee’s work-life balance.

  1. Encourage a positive feedback culture

A 2009 Mckinsey Quarterly survey found that respondents saw praise from their managers, leadership attention and a chance to lead projects or task forces as no less or even more effective motivators than cash based incentives. Aside from giving praise, you can also recognize your employees’ achievements by suggesting they give feedback and coaching to peers who are having difficulties in that particular area. This can help top employees develop leadership skills, and at the same time boost the performance levels of other employees.

Alternatively, you could suggest they give a presentation on this project, skill, etc. to the team. This will demonstrate an example of what you’re looking for to other employees and reinforce your recognition of their success. If employees share their successes with the rest of the team more often it will help foster a sense of community. Encouraging your employees to give more feedback and empowering them with new leadership skills is one of the best ways to keep them challenged and motivated.

Summary and take-aways:

An effective manager consistently recognizes their employees’ strengths and achievements with positive feedback. Employees who feel their work is appreciated by their manager and peers are highly motivated and more likely to stick with their current job. Giving more positive feedback can be a great way to encourage team spirit and a positive work culture.

  • Give examples and be specific
  • Don’t wait too long
  • Give feedback more frequently
  • Don’t base feedback on results
  • Set goals and new challenges
  • Encourage peer-to-peer feedback and sharing of achievements

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6 Social Media Benefits You’ll Get With a Millennial Team

Creative businessman giving presentation to colleagues in office

As marketers, we’re so often looking at the title “Millennial” as a golden egg – shining potential resting in our very hands that we’re unsure how to crack.

“Millennial” – it’s a word almost mystified, a world inside the word that encapsulates millions of people from around the globe.

A passionate, outspoken group with vast avenues for potential and growth.

Millennials.

Lazy, uninspired, and entitled.

No matter what comes to mind when you think of the Millennial generation, marketing teams have twisted themselves into knots trying to pitch brands and products to them. In fact, if you Google anything related to Millennials and marketing, you’ll quickly understand what I mean.

Between the copy-wars squabbling over Facebook and Snapchat, or whether Instagram is the true underdog to truly reach a Millennial crowd – wait, scratch that, Vine – you’re likely to leave more confused than before you began your search.

But the double-edged sword mentality regarding Millennials is part of the problem, too. On one hand, Millennials make up a HUGE population of people (a whopping 75.4 million according to Pew Research) whom marketers are chomping at the bit to gain credit with. On the other is the stereotype that Millennials are a lazy group without motivation or goals – that hiring them brings risks to your organization that you may not be willing to deal with.

So, essentially, we’d like to sell to Millennials while reducing  their abilities – making it harder for them to find employment and make money to spend on the products that marketers have exhausted time and money in reaching them.

That’s confusing.

No. Millennials aren’t lazy. They’re a fountain of wealth to your organization – and below we’ll share some social media benefits you’ll gain with a Millennial team.

Social Media and Millennials

It’s no secret: Millennials are big into social media. A 2015 Pew Research survey found that a solid 90 percent of young adults (18-29) are the most likely to use social media. But who’s surprised by that figure?

More than that, most Millennials were born into a world already embracing and adapting to rapidly evolving technologies – including social media.

Unlike adults who quickly on-boarded when social media proved a fruitful venture, Millennials grew up with it, experienced pivotal events through it, and formed long-lasting relationships because of it.

To put it bluntly: Millennials have a deeper connection to the internet and social media than any generation preceding them. As members – and consumers – of the Millennial generation, they know what their peers want to see, when they’ll be active, and how to engage with them in a meaningful way.

More Accurately Targeted Social Posts

Millennials know who likes what, to what extent, and where to find them instantly. You’ve probably figured this out by now, too. The difference is the way they can reach out to them.

Millennials are talked about constantly. They’ve been forced into a lot of corners already, having to defend their generation against a litany of accusations. Because of this, Millennials have had to do tons of research to keep up with grievances, research on different segments of the population, more deeply understanding people – sometimes surfacing with things you might not have considered.

Brainstorming with a younger team can lead to revelations about your targeted efforts – interests and groups that you never thought to be a meeting ground for your target audience.

Better Engagement

Speaking to people whom you don’t share many interests with can be difficult, however Millennials have to time and again to reach a level of acceptance with older generations. They know the language to use, the tools to fuel their message, and the places where it will be seen.

This intrinsic understanding of people within, and outside, their generation can give your social media presence the boost it needs to get you more followers, readers, and buyers.

Platform Adaptability

It seems like every day there’s some new social platform touting the death of Facebook. It’ll never happen. Millennials, however, are far more open to experiment with new ideas and social media platforms as they roll out. As their friends try out the latest video streaming app, they’re all-but-guaranteed to give it a spin, too.

Not afraid to dive straight into the deep-end, Millennials are quick to grasp how a platform works. They’ll probably have a good understanding of how to reach audiences quicker. And, even if your team isn’t the most creative, you’ll have a presence on a new platform before competition notices.

Masters of Microcontent

So we know Millennials spend a lot of time on social media, but how are they accessing it? According to findings in the 2016 U.S. Cross-Platform Future in Focus, just about 80 percent of social media is accessed from a smartphone.

What’s that mean?

Since Millennials are always on the move, this means they’re thinking, typing, snapping a photo, or recording a video on their toes. In a word, they’re quick to think of ways to share information in an easily digestible format.

Since many Millennials post consistently, they’re typically in the mindset to develop micro-copy to cause a specific reaction or outcome. They’re already seasoned professionals at it – no tweet editing necessary before sending them aflutter. Your organization will save a lot of time and money leaving microcontent in the hands of your Millennial team.

Keeping Relevant

Born into a world of instant access to information, news, and pop culture, Millennials have the ability to see an event and create a post that harkens to the event or emotions tied to it. They know what will trend before Facebook does, and they know how to get people excited about it.

Having a Millennial staff of social media gurus gives you an edge in creating viral posts about topics nowhere near your radar, but whose mention can yield incredible results.

Social Freedom = Better Results

Attached to relevancy is the freedom (within reason) to let your social media team craft a tone and engage with followers unfettered. Not to mention the points you’ll score for having a more flexible working arrangement.

PwC study results confirm that Millennials value greater flexibility, appreciation, and team collaboration. If you show trust – and they prove to be trustworthy – you’ll have yourself a stellar team ready to elevate your social media presence to the next level.

As Millennials grow, there’s no time to write them off and shut them out. As a generation, they are the gatekeepers of the Internet. They understand it in a way older generations simply cannot. And, with the right motivation and leadership with them, they’ll prove beneficial to your organization and campaigns.

About the Author

todd-giannattasioTodd Giannattasio

CEO & Founder at Tresnic Media

Helping businesses build their brand and acquire customers with strategic content production and promotion.

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The HR Tech Weekly® Awarded Top 100 HR Blogs for Human Resource & Talent Management Experts

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List of top 200 HR blogs for Human Resource & Talent Management experts ordered by popularity based on search engine ranking, content quality and popularity on social networks.

In order to be included, each blog was required to meet several criteria:

  • Contribute thoughtful insights and analysis to the HR community
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Three Findings from Deloitte’s “Global Human Capital Trends 2016 Report” for Recruiters

Deloitte’s Global Human Capital Trends 2016:

Over the past few years major disruptions have occurred in HR and corporate structures and organizations. Recently, Deloitte conducted a comprehensive global study of human capital trends and published those findings in a robust report titled: Global Human Capital Trends (GHCT) 2016–The New Organization: Different by Design. According to the researchers, “Sweeping global forces are reshaping the workplace, the workforce, and work itself.” The findings in this report are incredibly relevant and important for professional recruiters to be aware of and potentially take action on.

The data were compiled from more than 7,000 survey responses from corporate leaders in over 130 countries around the world. This blog post will present a few of the highlights from the report that will impact recruiting/hiring now and in the future.

The knowledge and wisdom gained from this study are two-fold for recruiting agencies, corporate recruiters, executive search firms, and/or legal search firms: (1) The study offers ideas for how recruiting agencies might want to run their businesses, and (2) The investigation provides many ‘nuggets’ of information into how your potential customers are running their organizations. If you have this knowledge it can only help you gain an advantage in the hyper-competitive world of professional recruiting. Part of running a successful business is truly understanding the ‘business challenges’ that your customers face on a daily basis.

The researchers begin by identifying 4 overarching changes that are affecting corporate structures: Demographic shifts (50-60% of workforce are millennials); Pressure for Increased Speed for Time to Market (rapid disruption of business models); Digital everywhere; and a Different Social Contract for Workers.

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The top 10 trends identified were: Organizational Design, Leadership, CultureEngagement, Learning, Design ThinkingChanging Skills of the HR OrganizationPeople Analytics, Digital HR, and Workforce Management.

Three of these trends (Organizational design, Culture, and Engagement) will be discussed. After summarizing the high points of the report on these three key trends I’ll point out ways these items will specifically impact recruiting and talent management.

Organizational Design & Structure

One key point of departure identified, in the study, was significant changes in organizational structure. The authors concur, “as companies strive to become more agile and customer-focused, organizations are shifting their structures from traditional, functional models toward interconnected, flexible teams.” Another way to think about the trend toward teams would be viewing them through the prism of a Hollywood movie production team and less like traditional corporate structures. Essentially, akin to a movie-set, people are coming together to tackle projects, then disbanding and moving on to new assignments once the project is complete.

bersinghctreportimage31

The implication for professional recruiters is re-thinking your organizational design in order to parlay the benefits of teams instead of the more traditional structure focused primarily on individuals doing specific tasks. In other words, professional recruiters would be encouraged to work together to connect talented people with amazing opportunities, instead of working ‘alone’ to achieve these goals (presumably working individually on a list of candidates and clients).

Here are a few suggestions that the GHCT study offers:

  • Looking at your organizations design: think about re-organization that includes “mission-driven” teams focused on customers, markets, or products. Perhaps it makes sense to assign a ‘team’ of recruiters/hiring managers to work on one specific job type or talent pool.
  • Critically analyzing your rewards and goals: think about your performance management around ‘team performance’ and ‘team leadership’ rather than focusing solely on individual performance. Moreover, reward people for project results, collaboration, and helping others. If a team is assigned to find talent for a specific client incentivize a team of 5 to get 25 placements done this quarter (instead of placing the task of each individual recruiter to get 5 placements on their own).
  • Implementing new team-based tools: put in place tools and measurement systems that encourage people to move between teams, and share information and collaborate with other teams. For recruiters this would mean structuring your firm in a way that encourages team members to work together to achieve company-wide goals for placements. Also, this would encourage communication and networking to ensure that the entire team/company is being successful.
  • Allowing teams to set their own goals: teams should be held accountable for results – but let them decide how to perform, socialize, and communicate these goals among the team. Instead of managers mandating what the goals are, allow the teams to collectively and creatively come up with ways to be held to account for their performance measurable’s.

Shaping Culture

Another vital trend in this study was the impact of culture on business strategy. The authors define culture as, “the way things work around here”. Also, culture is the system of values, beliefs, and behaviors that shape how real work gets done within an organization. As opposed to seeing culture as primarily an HR issue/problem, “CEOs and executive teams should take responsibility for an organization’s culture (with HR supporting that responsibility through measurement, process, and infrastructure).” Leaders should embody and actively engage in the kind of ‘culture’ they want their teams to reflect.

Interestingly, 28% of survey respondents believe they understand their culture well, while only 19% believe they have the ‘right culture.’ Change is so prevalent for organizations in 2016 that an effective culture can be the determining factor for if an entity can successfully weather the storms of change.

The implication for recruiters, in terms of culture, is ensuring that the executive leadership – in conjunction with HR – has thought deeply about the system of values, beliefs, and behaviors that shapes how placements are made within your recruiting agency. What are some ‘universal’ cultural values that your firm places a great deal of faith in? What types of qualities do you want your recruiters to look for as they place people? More specifically, GHCT encourages the following:

  • Prioritizing culture by CEO’s: Executives must clearly understand their company’s cultural values, determine how they connect to business strategy, and take responsibility for shaping them. Also, executives should routinely take their own inventory and analyze whether their own behaviors reinforce the desired culture.
  • Understanding both the current and desired culture: critical for leaders to examine current business practices to see how, and if, they align properly with desired culture. If there are practices that are counter-productive they should be thrown out and new ones implemented that edify the desired culture.
  • Measuring culture: Use empirical tools to understand employee attitudes and actions. HR should take the lead in this effort and get the results back to leaders for assessment (in a timely manner).

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Engagement – Always On

And finally, yet another trend identified in this study was employee engagement (which is closely tied to culture). Engagement is, “how people feel about the way things work around here.” The researchers also note that engagement is, “…a strong focus on listening to employees, workforce health and well-being, job redesign, and an enterprise-wide analysis of all dimensions of employee engagement.” Most companies still only evaluate engagement on an annual basis (64%), but in order to be truly effective managers and leaders should, “be proactive, implement the right tools, and give business leaders a continuous stream of data … and promote a culture of listening, and ensure that reward systems are consistent with engagement and retention goals.” True engagement means being ‘always on’ and continuously listening for what employees want and need from their jobs.

Engagement is also crucial because millennials are less loyal to organizations than ever before. Additionally, companies are tasked with a continued need to attract workers with technological and other specialized skills (as all companies digitize their businesses). And, finally, an organization’s employment brand is now open and transparent, so job candidates can easily see if a company is a great place to work (think of all of the “Best Place to Work” lists that are routinely populated on social media channels).

For professional recruiters the trend toward engagement can be meaningful in at least a couple of different ways. One, engaging all recruiters/hiring managers in effective ways can improve the culture/engagement/loyalty of team members. And, two, understanding the employee engagement of your customers (i.e., companies you are working to place candidates with) can aid in having successful placements where the candidate and the customer are both satisfied with the ‘marriage’. The researchers conclude:

  • inspirational201631Redefining engagement: By moving past the notion of turning your organization into a great place to work; also means “reaching down to the team and individual levels to foster highly engaged teams of employees doing work they love to do”.
  • Creating a sense of passion, purpose, and mission: Providing free perks can be nice, but companies that succeed in having highly engaged employees focus on driving meaning, purpose, and passion among their workers.
  • Linking compensation to engagement: Managers must get on board with tying team leaders’ compensation to their team members’ engagement. This sends a powerful signal and drives a sense of accountability about engagement efforts.
  • Doing “stay” interviews: In addition to having ‘exit’ interviews to find out why employees are leaving, also use ‘stay’ interviews to learn what it would take for an employee to stay at a company.

This article has outlined 3 of the 10 trends that the Global Human Capital Trends 2016 Report covers. More highlights to come regarding HR trends that will no doubt have long-lasting impacts on professional recruiters. Suffice to say, the landscape of work is changing rapidly and it is critical that professional recruiters are aware of the trends and adapt their businesses accordingly.

For more information on this study check out the Full Report.


Source: Three Findings from Deloitte’s “Global Human Capital Trends 2016 Report” for Recruiters – Crelate

Increase Your Response Rate to Job Candidates

Be Relevant

The days of sending generic recruiting emails (We’re Hiring!) to potential candidates, hoping that someone actually responds, are coming to an end… and it cannot come soon enough.

Candidates, especially the best ones, are increasingly exhausted and frustrated by the deluge of generic emails they get from recruiters. Generic emails go where they should – in the trash, with the sender either blocked or relegated to SPAM limbo.

It does not need to be this way though. Today is the day you get relevant, right up front, and with relevancy comes response.

Consider: In our research at Paysa, as well as our years of hiring thousands of people across many companies, we have found that people take jobs based on five factors:

  1. Salary: Will I make a competitive salary?
  2. Team: Will I be working with people that I can learn from, that I can respect and trust, and reversely, will I have the ability to contribute and teach?
  3. Impact: Will my skills and experience be leveraged in a way to make an impact?
  4. Future growth: Will this position help me grow my career?
  5. Company: Am I excited about the prospects of the hiring company?

If you want to drastically increase your response rates with candidates as well as your hiring success rate, anchor your communication in these areas from the outset.

Too many recruiters and/or hiring managers hide much of this information until the end (often bitter) which can result in no response, or even worse, a disconnect in the position match.

Relevancy = Response. Start early.

In our experience, the perfect job candidate email contains a mix of the following information:

Money: What can the candidate expect to make? By creating a ‘fake’ profile (skills, experience, education) for your candidate on Paysa, you can determine what they are making at their current company. Using this information, you can better position the salary of the new job: “Opportunity to make more than you are making today”…

Skills: Highlight the candidate’s core skills and experiences that make them a such a good match. Give the candidate a sense for how those skills and experiences are needed by the hiring company, and subsequently their ability to make an impact. What new skills will they be acquiring and what is the market value of those skills?

People: Let the candidate know the background of people they will be working with at the company. How good is the team? Paysa’s CompanyRank is a great tool for this – it measures and tracks the density of technical talent of companies over time.

Company: Tell the candidate what is special about the hiring company – it could be size of the company, customer or data access, market opportunity, the people, etc.

While it takes more time to create targeted emails, the results will be worth it. Happy hunting!

About the Author

Chris Bolte, CEO & Co-Founder at Paysa

Chris Bolte, CEO and Co-Founder of Paysa.

Chris is passionate about helping employees maximize their value across the arc of their career.

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