4 Challenges of Recruiting Foreign Workers

One of the most overlooked and undervalued aspects of today’s life is transportation. We often forget the troubles our ancestors faced when trying to go from one country to other. Travel time was measured in months, often by foot and with scarce food, while having to face the risk of getting robbed and/or beaten. Meanwhile, not a single five-star hotel in sight.

Today people don’t have to worry about such problems, but many others arise while recruiting the right foreign workers. But why go through all the trouble? Well, even though hiring internationally doesn’t equal with hiring remotely just in Britain foreign workers create an economic boost of over 210 billion pounds per year. Foreign workers are more productive, happier, complain less and don’t quit so easily.

Hitting the Mark

Finding the right foreign worker is all about searching for him in the right location. Spread too thin and nothing is accomplished but a bullseye in the wrong target also misses the spot. First, examine your own needs. Do you require a skilled worker? Or are you broadening your trade options? Different zones in the world produce different results when it comes to recruitment.

When searching for skilled workers, look for places with the high number of unemployed graduates or for countries that are in a transition period or are emerging economies. For instance, countries in the Balkans are known for the latter while Scandinavian countries are already oversaturated with a qualified workforce.

Language Barriers

Proper communication is crucial for successful navigation of the workplace. This especially applies for skilled workers which will often require complex instructions. In a nutshell, both sides aren’t on the same page yet.

Businesses have no issues when everyone is local and can easily reach the right person for some questions and answers. But when foreign workers come into the equation it becomes more important than ever to keep everyone informed.

Some companies mitigate this by educating their new foreign employees in a multiway approach, helping them to learn the language in the workplace or by outsourcing this education to specialized PTE classes. This way, those businesses kill two birds with one stone, considering those classes are also used as a proof for language knowledge in visa gaining process.

You may also try dedicating a member of the staff with helping out in communicating with the newcomers. This way, by putting in an effort, you not only alleviate some of the pressure all foreign workers face but also show care for integrating new members. So, if they aren’t having a successful communication at least one member of the staff can mediate until they learn new language.

The Right Type of Recruitment

In today’s virtual age, it’s all too easy to choose the easy way and try performing international recruitment phase without ever going face-to-face.  Which is going to land you with a lot of problems later on.

Without seeing someone in person you miss out on the most important part of communication called non-verbal communication. All those gestures, micro-expressions, body language gets left out, and with it, your intuition and that gut feeling about someone and their character.

Of course, sometimes going to another country just for recruitment may not be an option; traveling costs or your own engagement at the workplace could be an issue. If that’s the case, try finding a representative on the ground while international recruitment is in the process.  

This way, you show a human version of your business to potential recruits all the while receiving a complex and personal impression about them. Alternatively, make use of local recruitment agencies that will work with your HR on the ground.

Reaction to the New Environment

Almost 25% of HR that work with this subject say that stress-related with adapting to a new environment represents a significant problem. It’s a two-sided issue, first, the impact of it cannot be measured until the end of candidate relocation, and if it becomes too big, it often creates significant losses in terms of relocation cost or wasted recruitment.  

This is why overcoming this problem should be your main focus in the employee integration phase. Preparation before relocation, suggest resources and materials so they know what to expect when coming. Encourage them to come before starting the job so they have the necessary time to adapt.

Be proactive and adaptive if they cannot. Offer any support you can, so a transition (a hard period in itself) goes as smoothly and painlessly as possible. And remember, every individual has their own type of reaction that varies by intensity and length, some people get used to new things immediately, and some will always have a hard time adapting.

To summarize: search in the right places in the right way. Help your new employees in their acclimatization period and be supportive in any way you can. In the end, both parties will end up happy.

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Top 5 Ways to Use a Video in Recruitment

Discover the best ways you can use videos to attract and win the best job candidates!

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Why should you use video in recruitment?

Using videos in recruitment is one of the most productive recruitment marketing strategies that can help you attract and hire the best talent.

There are many reasons why you should use a video in recruitment. Adopting this trend will help you stand out in the saturated job market, differentiate from your competitors, showcase your employer brand and woow candidates with a great candidate experience.

How to use videos in recruitment?

Here are the top 5 ways you can use videos to improve your recruitment efforts:

1. Create a company culture video

Show, don’t tell. Create a company culture video and showcase your workplace culture, your office and your employees.

You can use your own smartphone and ask one simple question – and still create a memorable, company culture video- Check out this example from LinkedIn!  

2. Ad a video to your job posting

If you ad a video to your job postings, Google will recognize it as more relevant and show it at the top of job seekers search results.

As a result, more candidates will click on it and apply. According to CareerBuilder, job postings with videos have a 34% greater application rate.

3. Create a Facebook live video

Another way to incorporate a video into your recruitment practices is to create a Facebook live video. It is a perfect opportunity to answer all your candidates’ questions.

It’s simple and easy – all you need is your smartphone! The record of your video will automatically be posted on your timeline so people can view it again later. Check out a great example form L’Oreal!

4. Send videos to your silver medalists

Silver medalists are your second best job candidates. These are candidates that you didn’t hire – this time. However, these are great people that could be a perfect fit for some of your future job positions.

Use videos to deliver a bad news to these candidates and tell them that they didn’t get the job. They will appreciate your effort and personalized message.

5. Use videos to welcome and onboard new hires

You can also use videos as a part of your onboarding process. Sending a welcome video to your new hires is a great way to keep them engaged until their starting date.

You can also use a video to introduce your new hires to your company culture and their job duties. Check out a great example form Dunkin Donuts!

Want to create a recruitment video for your company?

Hopefully, these 5 ways to use a video in recruitment have sparked your creativity and inspired you to create your very own recruitment videos.

Yes, you can do it and no, you don’t a huge budget or a professional help. You can create great recruitment videos with your own smartphone!

Candidates are not interested in flashy corporate videos – they’ve seen tons of them. What they want to see is how it is really like to work at your company. DIY videos are authentic – and this is why candidates like them.

To help you get started, we gathered great practical tips for creating a perfect recruitment video! Be sure to check them out.

 

3 Best Employee Onboarding Tips

Looking to improve your employee onboarding process? Simply follow these 3 great tips!
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Why should you improve your employee onboarding program?

Employee onboarding is a very method used in talent acquisition.

If done right, the employee onboarding process can easily become your secret weapon for hiring and retaining talent.

A successful employee onboarding program ensures that your best candidate actually shows up on their first day at the new job.

This is because a successful employee onboarding process starts at the moment your best candidate accepts your offer. If you don’t engage you best candidates until their start date, they might accept a better offer or a counteroffer from their current employer.

It also helps to improve retention, engagement, satisfaction, and productivity of your new employees.

According to the Society For Human Resources Management (SHRM):

  • 69% of employees are more likely to stay with a company for three years if they experienced great onboarding.
  • Organizations with a standard onboarding process experience 50% greater new-hire productivity.
  • 54% of companies with onboarding programs reported higher employee engagement.

3 best employee onboarding tips

Here are the best 3 tips that will help get the most out of your onboarding program:

Tip #1: Plan and organize

If you want to maximize the power of your onboarding process, you need to carefully structure it. To learn how, check out our step-by-step Guide on how to successfully onboard new employees.  

Keep in mind that:

  1. A successful onboarding is a process
    A successful employee onboarding is not an event that takes place on your new employee’s first day at the office. It is a continuous process that starts at the moment your best candidate accepts your job offer.
  2. A successful onboarding is people oriented
    A successful employee onboarding is not focused on tasks, but on people.
    The human touch drives onboarding success.  The secret of great onboarding is the fact that it makes your new employees feel welcomed and integrated into your company culture from the day one!

Tip #2: Automate

Automating your employee onboarding process will help you save time and your nerves. There are many different employee onboarding tools you can use to easily automate your onboarding process.

There are 3 main types of employee onboarding tools:

  • Checklists
    Checklists are the most simple and straightforward tool that can help you onboard new employees.
  • Specialized tools
    Specialized employee onboarding tools are tools created for the sole purpose of improving the employee onboarding process.
  • Integrated tools
    Integrated tools are comprehensive, all-in-one tools that offer solutions for your whole HR management process, including payroll, benefits, time and attendance, etc.

Tip#3: Be creative

To make your new employees’ onboarding experience truly unique, you need to get creative! Luckily for you, we compiled the best and the most innovative employee onboarding ideas and examples from experts to inspire you!

Here are 3 simple, but creative employee onboarding ideas you can easily implement:

  1. Welcome GIF or video
    Gather your team and create a welcome video for your new employee!
    If your employees shy away from a camera or you don’t have enough time on your hands, go with the quicker version – create a welcome GIF!
  2. Decorate your new employee’s desk
    Decorate your new employee’s desk with some balloons, welcome sign and maybe even some cake! You can also pack your company swag (such as branded notebook, pens, T-shirt, water bottle, etc.) as a present!
  3. 100th-day party
    Throwing a 100 day on the job party for your employees is a great opportunity to shower them with some attention and remind them how much you are happy to have them joined your company.

5 Great, Underutilized Places to Promote Your Recruitment Content

Discover 5 great places where you can promote your recruitment content for free!

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Looking for additional places to promote your recruitment content?

All your time and effort invested in brainstorming great recruitment content ideas and creating interesting and useful recruitment content for every step of candidate journey will be wasted if you don’t promote it.

Many HR professionals publish their recruitment content on their company’s career sites and job posting sites.

They also share it on social media. They know that if they want to be successful at promoting their employer brand on social media, they have to learn all the tricks of recruiting on Facebook and create an outstanding LinkedIn Company Page.

However, there are many other places where you can promote your recruitment content to maximize its reach and achieve better ROI.

5 great, underutilized places to promote your recruitment content

Here is the list of the 5 best underutilized places where you can promote your recruitment content for free:

1. Your employees’ social media profiles

Asking your employees to share your recruitment content on their personal social media profiles is one of the most effective tactics for promoting your recruitment content. Recruitment content shared by employees receives 8 times more engagement than content shared by companies.

2. Online forums

Online forums are very effective, but often overlooked place to promote your recruitment content on. You can choose between numerous different forums, from general ones to those dedicated to special industry area or any other topic.

3. Blogs

Blogs are another relatively underutilized place where companies can promote their recruitment content. Do a little research to find out which blogs your candidate persona regularly follow and offer to write a guest blog post.

4. University’s websites

If you’re looking to attract top young talent, then university websites are your go-to places for promoting your recruitment content. Many universities and colleges offer an opportunity for employers to advertise their recruitment content completely free of charge.

5. Company review sites

Online company review sites (such as Glassdoor and Great place to work) are a perfect place to promote your recruitment content and enhance your Employer Brand. According to Glassdoor, 54% of online job seekers read company reviews from employees.

Best Practices Guide to Recruiting Passive Candidates

Passive Candidates

Considering that 66% of millennials rate life outside of work as more important than their career, chances are that the candidates you are looking for aren’t spending much time looking for you. For this reason, among many others, passive candidates are becoming the new purple squirrel. Some of the best talent around may be just satisfied enough to stay where they are.

Don’t Waste Time on Cold Calls

Believe it or not, sending a direct message through a social platform (yes, even the professional ones) is about as effective and efficient as a good old fashioned cold call. It is certainly possible to find some great hires via direct messaging, and even generate a few referrals. However, consider how much time are you spending to fill one open position; with all the non-interested and unqualified candidates, forget about sourcing enough talent to staff an entire office. If the goal is to find the hidden gems in a sea of passive candidates, your recruitment strategy will need to incorporate the latest in talent acquisition technology and trends.

Some popular social platforms even charge recruiters to send messages to potential candidates. If you have enough open jobs to fill, that could get quite expensive. The big pink elephant that most talent acquisition teams don’t want to admit is that sending unsolicited messages to candidates is SPAM, even via LinkedIn. Sending those unsolicited messages doesn’t give off a very good impression of your organization.

There are several assumptions that go into contacting a passive candidate on social channels, the least of which is whether the candidate profile is accurate and current. That’s not to say there is no fruit on that tree, but it isn’t the low hanging fruit and it takes a lot of time and effort to reach it.

Source More Passive Candidates with Employee Referrals

One great way to reach a broader audience of passive candidates is through an employee referral program (ERP). Just think about it. Word of mouth marketing and advertising has long been touted the most effective at providing great return on investment. Everyone loves customer referrals, and some companies even incentivize clients to refer new business. The same rules should apply to employee referral programs. Even though 84% of employer’s rate employee referrals as the best source for return on new hire investment, only 8% of organizations feel they have the right program in place to reach these candidates.

By utilizing employee referrals, you are turning what would have been a hit-or-miss cold call into a warm transfer. You are no longer sending spam to candidates you are trying to recruit, and you have the endorsement of your current team. In addition, employee referrals help to pre-screen candidates for cultural fit, which is something even the most experienced talent acquisition teams could take 1-2 interviews to uncover.

Seeing that 52% of millennials consider corporate loyalty to be overrated, an employee referral might be the catalyst needed to take your passive candidate sourcing and talent acquisition strategies to the next level.

New Talent Acquisition Technology

Technology is great, however there are some major concerns with how employee referral programs are being developed and implemented. Misapplication of technology has attempted to replace human connections with a computer-based algorithm, resulting in underperforming ERPs. The current state of technology in the recruitment marketplace has focused on the ability of tech and social media to source, match, and present candidates for hire. The reality is that a computer match is not a referral, but merely a set of matching keywords and for this reason does not provide the results expected of a referred employee. Automation is not the same as a referral and as such has not solved the problem of reaching passive talent.

Talent acquisition efforts at a local level have made great strides by incorporating internet job boards and social media into candidate sourcing strategies, but these techniques alone are not enough to create the groundswell of support among employees that would be required to make an automated process a reliable source of organic employee referrals. The most effective ERPs include ways to share jobs via social media and distribute to networks of connections, but they also include functions like referral bonus tracking, employee notifications, employee engagement reporting, ATS integration and more. These are the types of force multipliers that are difficult to develop at a local level and are often beyond the reach of HR teams.

At Lingo, we believe in the power of referrals. That’s why we took our best in class referral marketing platform and re-invented employee referrals for the digital generation. With Lingo, employers can load jobs (one at a time or in bulk) and current employees are automatically notified of the new job openings via the Lingo mobile app. Employees can then elect which jobs to share, which channels to share them on (text message, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and email), and which of their friends are best suited for the role. Employees can even elect to share the job opening on their social profile wall, and endorse applicants as they see fit. By taking the keyword matching and automation out of the process, you can empower your staff to recruit the most qualified candidates they know, even the most passive contenders.

Click here to learn more about recruiting passive candidates with employee referrals and how Lingo Careers enables teams to increase talent acquisition efficiency.


If you want to share this article the reference to Adam Palmer and The HR Tech Weekly® is obligatory.

How to Adapt to IT Recruiting Trends in 2016 • Recruitee Blog

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Written by Hagi Trinh | Originally published at Recruitee Blog.

“In this market, where engineering supply is severely out of whack with demand, where good people are rarely actively looking for jobs, and where contingency recruiters get at least $25,000 per hire, the biggest problem isn’t filtering through a bunch of engaged job seekers. The problem is engaging them in the first place.”Aline Lerner

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Hagi Trinh, Recruitment writer at Recruitee.com

Aline published this 9 months ago, yet the words have never been truer.

People working in the IT sector are in higher and higher demand. People recruiting them are in shorter and shorter supply. If you’re not one of the big guys, don’t do this:

Expect capable developers to send in CV with keywords such as “HTML.” Filter the system by searching for keywords such as “HTML” to put their names on top of some list. Ask them to go back and forth for six interviews with six different persons. Expect them to wait for another few weeks before the decision is made.

This “standard” recruiting process doesn’t apply anymore.

To get that top talent, you have to go out of your way, off the beaten path.

Guess what, some brave folks already did. More and more are following their tactics:

1 – Referral becomes your highest chance of getting high-quality candidates.

2 – The first contact is to establish mutual interests. Job advertising comes second.

3 – The entire application process should be completed on mobile.

4 – Big brands don’t always fit your hiring need.

5 – Hire the person, not the role.

6 – Build your own trial test to get your own fit candidates.

7 – What you sell is interesting challenges and recognition, in the form of employer brand.

8 – The need for speed is crucial when it comes to offering jobs.

Let’s go through them.

(you can click on each trend below to tweet it)

Sourcing stage

1 — Referral becomes your highest chance of getting high-quality candidates

What to do: Offer a clear referral recruiting bonus, from $2,000 and above is market rate for good developers. Sit down with all your employees one by one. Leave the potential candidates’ availability behind, and only focus on your hiring standards. Have around three of those up your sleeve, for example: be smart, get things done, collaborate well. Go through all your employees’ networks with the standards in mind and a spreadsheet. Save time for everybody, just input the referrer’s name and link to the potential candidate’s profile. The name and contact info you can figure out later on your own. Keep the employees in the loop when you reach out, because they can help pitch in too. Together, you prove to the potential candidates that you are not just another CV-monger.

2 — The first contact is to establish mutual interests. Job advertising comes second

What to do: Comment on their work. Most developers share it on their GitHub’s accounts. Pinpoint the things the potential candidates do well and tell them that. You appreciate their expertise, so, you want to have their service. Your email will rise above the mediocre cold ones. Good developers like that. Good developers reply to that.

3 — The entire application process should be completed on mobile

Why? Let’s say you are selling an ideal place – the ideal place – to an IT expert, but you force them to apply via a bureaucratic, outdated system with buttons and forms clearly designed for desktops in the 90s. Talk about the irony.

What to do: Make all communication and application accessible and doable on mobile.

Screening Stage

4 — Big brands don’t always fit your hiring need

You’d feel impressed if the candidates used to work for Google, Facebook, and the likes. But hold yourself for a moment there. Look more into what the candidates have actually done. Ask yourself again and again: Is that really a match to what I need?

What to do: Get the candidates on the phone and ask them about their latest project. What is it? Why did they choose to do it? What is its impact on the company? Only very passionate people know every nook and cranny of their project. Proceed with them right away. If by any chance you have doubts about the candidate’s honesty, get references from those who have worked directly with them.

Interviewing Stage

5 — Hire the person, not the role

Looking at the speed of IT development, the role you craft so carefully now could very well be in the trash bin in the next 2 years. You don’t need subject matter expert. You need someone who is an expert at learning and picking up new subject matters over and over again.

What to do: Ask if the person has been trying a variety of tools and programming languages in the past. What did they make out of that? Which one are they most proud of? And why?

For more judging criteria of general good coding practice, you can use the Joel Test by Joel Spolsky (co-founder of Trello and Fog Creek Software, and CEO of Stack Exchange).

  1. Do you use source control?
  2. Can you make a build in one step?
  3. Do you make daily builds?
  4. Do you have a bug database?
  5. Do you fix bugs before writing new code?
  6. Do you have an up-to-date schedule?
  7. Do you have a spec?
  8. Do programmers have quiet working conditions?
  9. Do you use the best tools money can buy?
  10. Do you have testers?
  11. Do new candidates write code during their interview?
  12. Do you do hallway usability testing?

Make sure you read his elaboration on each question. Then you’ll have a pretty good idea about the candidate’s ability to keep things in control through ups and downs.

6 — Build your own trial test to get your own fit candidates

There are more and more platforms offering tests and ranking developers, so why bother? If you use ready-made tests, the candidates learn nothing from your context, and you learn nothing from what the candidates can offer to solve your own problems. Offering an opportunity for both sides to get to know each other is well worth the hassle.

What to do: Extract a part of the current workload that needs to be done. Write a brief with background information, the resources the candidates can use, and the deliverables for each stage of the trial process (for examples: evaluation, concept, prototype, code). If the trial test needs more than an hour of work, play fair and square: offer to pay the candidates. A standard rate from Automattic is $25 per hour.

7 — What you sell is interesting challenges and recognition, in the form of an employer brand

Foosball and free lunch are nice, but they just aren’t the things good developers go after.

What to do: Communicate the company’s vision and culture through and through. But don’t paint an unreal picture or set up unreal expectations. Provide concrete examples of current or past employees that you walk the talk.

Offering Stage

8 — The need for speed is crucial when it comes to offering jobs

Yes, good developers are in high demand, as you’ve been aware of all along. It would be hopelessly naive if you think they would just sit and wait for your decision. Every day waiting is an open invitation for them to choose other companies.

What to do:

“If you have conviction about a candidate at the end of interview day, you spend the next day closing.”John Ciancutti

Conclusion

Every point listed above is so counter-intuitive compared to the old way. They require you to put in more effort, more attention, more time.

But if you don’t, you will have to spend even more effort, even more attention, even more time to fix a bad hire.

Even if you can only apply one point to your recruiting process for now, start anyway. You’ll be surprised how much of a difference it’ll make.

Have you discovered other interesting trends in recruiting IT talent? Tell us in the comment below, tweet, or email Recruitee.com!

Source: How to Adapt to IT Recruiting Trends in 2016 • Recruitee Blog