The Next Frontier in Shared Services | The HR Tech Weekly®

The Next Frontier in Shared Services

For anyone who’s answered an email or text from a project team member on a weekend (and that’s just about all of us), it comes as no surprise that digitization has profoundly disrupted the way we work. However, this “new normal” of always-on, instantaneous communication among networks of teams is now dovetailing with another force that is equally as disruptive: a changing workforce, led by increasing numbers of Millennials. Together, these forces are impacting the service delivery landscape and calling upon the HR shared services organization to engage with employees via digital tools, often in entirely new ways.

A digital employee experience is no longer optional; it’s a necessary survival skill for those seeking to attract, retain, and facilitate engagement with the next-generation workforce. At a recent Deloitte workshop, we explored what makes Millennials different, (backed by the findings of the 2016 Deloitte Millennial Survey), along with strategies for meeting their elevated expectations. Among the characteristics put forth at the event, Millennials:

·      Are digitally native, and, by and large, they would rather use their phones for text or email than talk to people.

·      Expect “consumer-grade” experiences.

·      Tend to shun purely financial motivations, as they feel employee satisfaction and treating people well are the most important values in terms of long-term business success.

·      Crave leadership opportunities, with only 28 percent of the respondents in the Deloitte Millennial Survey believing their organizations make full use of their skills.

·      Expect to have mentors bring them up in the firm.

·      May have little, if any, loyalty to companies and may leave quickly if they believe their leadership skills are not being developed or if the company puts financial performance above everything else.

So, what does this mean for HR shared services? Nearly every company today, but especially those in traditional industries such as mining, manufacturing, and energy & resources, must find a way to replace growing numbers of retirees by attracting Millennials and elevating them to leadership roles quickly. This path toward reinvigorating the workforce by engaging Millennials runs directly through HR.

To attract and retain next-generation employees, HR organizations increasingly must deliver consumer-grade services through shared services by adopting digital tools and making the cultural adjustments required to leverage them fully. Many service delivery organizations have started to do this by transforming their contact centers, mainly by moving toward web self-help, email, and mobile channels to address simple inquiries, and reserving voice channels for answering more difficult questions. This makes sense given Millennials’ resistance to talking live, although the electronic component of these interactions has to be customer friendly. The technology has to work, without too much clicking or form-filling, or Millennials might move on—abandoning the interaction, and if the dissatisfaction persists, perhaps abandoning the employer altogether.

The strategic importance of digitizing the contact center was further emphasized in the findings of the 2015 Deloitte Contact Center Survey. Of note, 85 percent of organizations surveyed view the customer experience provided through their contact centers as a competitive differentiator, and half (50 percent) believe the contact center plays a primary role in customer retention.

While many HR shared services organizations are in tune with the engagement challenges next-generation workers pose, Millennials aren’t the only game in town. Baby Boomers and Gen Xers still must be served, and their customer satisfaction ratings are also important. While Millennials may view texting as a genuine form of human engagement, older groups largely do not. They want to talk to someone, and they view personal interactions as a preferred, and largely more effective way to solve problems, particularly complex ones.

Serving the needs of a multigenerational workforce today requires organizations to introduce digital employee experience tools, especially those that promote self-service and collaboration, while preserving existing voice-channel capabilities, at least in some situations. However, maintaining multiple platforms can be expensive and cumbersome, and stranding existing IT investments is rarely an option.

This has left many HR services organizations overwhelmed by the magnitude of technological change that stands before them. That’s why it’s important to take small steps instead of big leaps. For some organizations, implementing a cloud-based platform might be one of those incremental steps. Far from being just another portal, some of these platforms allow subscribers to develop, run, and manage shared services applications without the complexity of building and maintaining infrastructure and underlying technologies. In evaluating such a platform, the technology at a minimum should:

·      Deliver a consumer-grade user experience

·      Streamline processes and automate workflow

·      Simplify transactions by providing personalized content and context

·      Increase effectiveness and decrease cost for shared services operations

·      Make employee interactions and communication with HR simple and intuitive

Regardless of what technologies you choose, an improved digital employee experience is the next frontier in shared services. The overarching objective is to create a digital workplace that capitalizes on a company’s current technology investments by bringing disparate systems together and providing a personalized journey through shared services processes and related content via guided interactions. Why is this so important? Millennials expect nothing less. Your shared services center has to deliver high quality services or the next-generation workforce may gravitate to an organization that can.

For more insights about current HR topics, visit the HR Times Blog.

About the Authors:

Michael Gretczko is a principal with Deloitte Consulting LLP and the practice leader for Digital HR & Innovation. He focuses on helping clients fundamentally change how they operate, often working with large, complex, global organizations to guide transformation programs that enable HR organizations to reinvent the way they leverage digital to improve the employee experience and business performance.

Marc Solow is a director in Deloitte Consulting LLP and responsible for leading Deloitte’s HR Shared Services market offering in the United States. Marc has led the consulting services in support of several global HR transformation, shared services, and outsourcing projects for large and complex clients in a variety of industries, including insurance, health care, life sciences, consumer and industrial products, and energy.

Copyright © 2017 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved.


Source: The next frontier in shared services | Michael Gretczko | Pulse | LinkedIn

Talent Acquisition Process as a Whole Needs to Change Radically

Talent Acquisition Process as a Whole Needs to Change Radically

Written by Çağatay GüneyPeoplise.

Talent Acquisition Process as a Whole Needs to Change Radically

We Went Digital

Let’s admit it. We are all hooked. Some of us are downright addicts.

No one seems to be able to pick up a good restaurant without asking advice from an app, laptops are always on our laps, vacations are never without work, long forgotten friends are a click away and we whatsapp our customers. According to Ericson’s Consumer Lab report, a typical white collar worker spends %20 of his time on business apps. Add to that the time spent on social networking sites and shopping, you will get a full day of app happiness. As if that is not enough, 43% of the working population downloads a new app every week. It does not get better at home, either. On average, the time spent on digital will reach a staggering 5,3 hours per day excluding work activities.

Generation Z Is Upon Us

That is just us; the current workforce. Now think about the next generation. The Generation Z. The Millenials. People call them Gen Tech, Gen Net, Gen Wii; Digital Natives. They were born into the digital world. In fact, they are the first generation whose births were announced on the internet. They never knew a time before the computers, www or apps. And now, they are on their way to the job market. Within 2-4 years a huge demographic shift will change the talent landscape forever. In US alone there are 67 million Generation Z members, born after 1998, making them almost as large as the baby boomers who have retired or retiring.

GenZs play, socialize, learn, engage, compete, succeed, fail, laugh, share in the digital universe. There is no divide, there are no boundaries between self and the digital. Life is digital and mobile, all the time. By the time Dad pours porridge for breakfast before the school bus arrives, his teen daughter would have looked at her mobile phone 5 times already. Teens today spend 27 hours a week online.

Not only that, they view the world differently too. Many of the old-world assumptions and methods don’t sway or impress their young and boundless minds. Better educated generations demand better things from the society and companies. Nearly three quarters of those surveyed (74%) agreed that businesses have a responsibility to create a better world.

Talent Acquisition Must Change

Understanding, attracting, and engaging the next generation of talent will require genuine new approaches, new methods and tools, almost all digital. The HR field has made some headways into social media hiring but that is just the beginning. Talent acquisition process as a whole needs to change radically to accommodate the new generation and their digital habits. The days of the printed CVs, tedious application screens, long on-site personal interviews are numbered.

The companies who embrace the digital challenge early on are already reaping incredible advantages over their competition in talent attraction, branding, engagement, and retention. They are utilising games, social media widgets, chat bots, video interviews, online tests, and smart onboarding tools with great effect. It saves time, it is cheaper and provides a much better experience for the young talent for sure.

Start Now To Get Ahead

Finding the right digital tools, integration of processes and developing new work practices takes time. It takes trial and error and some getting used to. But given the cost pressures and the demographics, this is a challenge all HR leaders have to face sooner rather than later. The pioneers of the new generation are already in the job market today.

So why wait? Let’s start planning for the transformation and plunge into the world of digital HR. Now, not later.

About the Author:

Çağatay Güney, CEO and Co-Founder at Peoplise

Çağatay Güney is Co-Founder and CEO at Peoplise.

Çağatay is a Human Resources and Organization Development professional with more than 20 years of experience both as a manager in and as an external consultant to several Fortune 500 companies in USA, Canada and Turkey.

He is also the author of two fictional novels.


Source: Digital HR – Time To Get Started

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The Biggest Change Set For Business Across The Globe

The Agile Working Event

The world of work as we know it is changing. Where, when and how we work and communicate are all questions that are being asked by workforces across the globe and as a result organisations of all sizes are entering a period of significant change as they prepare for the future of work.

The Agile Working Event is a brand new one-day conference that will give senior HR professionals and business owners the opportunity to hear from agile working leaders and industry pioneers who have implemented change that has resulted in success for employees and business. The agenda boasts key organisations such as BT, Nationwide, Eon and Lancaster University as well as a Keynote address from Fiona Cannon of Lloyds Banking Group and CEO of the Agile Future Forum.

We know that a highly engaged workforce has the potential to reduce staff turnover by up to 87% and it is these statistics that are making the headlines and making businesses stop and plan for the future. Prospective employees from the latest generation no longer just think about their pay cheque before accepting a job. Office dynamics, workforce engagement, remote working opportunities, technology enablers and office aesthetics are key priorities when searching for a new role.

Further research has found that losing a valued employee due to poor working conditions or lack of engagement could cost upwards of £10,000. Retaining the best talent in any market is considered business critical and this results from this research further outlines why.

Gone are the days of candidates choosing their new job based on salary alone. Millennials now have a huge expectation of their prospective employer when it comes to technology and remote working availability for example. Yet still employers are making the fatal mistake of offering items such as this as a feature or a benefit of working for said company, rather than a standard requirement.

When it comes to workforce performance, attracting and retaining great people, and overall business success, organisations need to consistently review their operations when looking to adapt an agile working strategy.

The Agile Working Event boasts a line up of speakers whom have campaigned for agile working for business, who challenge ‘the norm’ and ultimately who have a passion in sharing real-life case studies behind their very own agile working journey in order to aid business.

Sebastien Bonicel, Agile Transformation Coach, EON and a key speaker at The Agile Working Event 2017 has based his agile working approach around the relationships within the organanisation and specifically how we communicate, why and when. Sebastien believes that understanding relationships within the workplace is a key indicator as to why we go to work in the first place. One idea that Sebastien has of which he will speak on detail on at the event, even goes as far as having a P&L for relationships in the workplace in order to see how this is linked to both individual and organisation performance.

Event organisers, Sonas Events Ltd, seek to provide a forum for the business community both in the UK and globally in which delegates can share experiences and take away a toolbox of solutions to implement within their own businesses, that ultimately deliver results.

Adam Cox, Director at Sonas Events Ltd said about the launch, “The Agile Working Event launches at an opportune juncture in the future of business. Organisations across the world are consistently reviewing their strategies in order to ensure they are at the forefront of their industry sectors, and as it stands I don’t think the business world has had to prepare for anything quite like this. The rulebook is being thrown out with many organisations encouraging their staff to promote the way in which they want to work rather than dictating it to them. The Agile Working Event aims to bring together like-minded professionals to collaborate, share knowledge and debate key issues facing their operations in obtaining agile working status and I am looking forward to welcoming delegates to London on 29 March 2017”.

For further information on The Agile Working Event please visit:
www.agileworkingevent.com

Early bird tickets are still available for a short time only and you can save £100 on your ticket by clicking here: https://billetto.co.uk/en/events/agile-working-event/tickets

How to Avoid the Traps of Hyperconnetivity

Our society demands connectivity. Through constant Facebook and Twitter updating, texting and the like the millennial generation has become all too adept at “staying in touch“. Technology has allowed us to maintain relationships. Now, not only are we able to keep in touch with old friends, but we can also work alongside people with whom we may never have the opportunity to shake hands. Within living memory, computers have moved from the environments of enterprises to devices in our pockets. Social media have trumped traditional media. Most recently, the cloud has appeared making massive amounts of data and applications available anywhere there is a connection to the internet.  The result of all of this is that today we are faced with the phenomenon of hyperconnectivity. The term refers not only to the myriad means of communication and interaction, but also to its impact on both personal and organizational behavior.

The effect of hyperconnectivity is that the limitations of time and space have largely been overcome. Experience is virtualized. You no longer need to be in the same room, or even the same country, as your colleague to accomplish what used to require face-to-face contact. Hyperconnectivity creates new business model opportunities and new ways of working: Web 2.0 social tools and the hyperconnected workforce are eroding many old work paradigms, from work locations to work hours. Workforces are becoming more virtual, and the 21st-century workforce will need to utilize various technologies to stay connected to one or several business networks. In addition, the workforce will need to utilise collaboration tools and techniques to increase productivity and engagement. In this manner, benefits such as enhanced productivity and improved decision making can be realized.

Hyperconnectivity will also impact the organization of the labor force. Major structural changes will include shifting patterns and proportions of workers who are part-time, share jobs, and telecommuting from any location. Plus, since these technologies and the related hyperconnected tools are here to stay, HR departments must learn how to deploy them effectively to their organization’s’ advantage. Policymakers and business leaders must surmount significant challenges if they are to ensure that the workforce is ready to be able to manage the increased pressure and stress levels of working in an ever-connected environment.

The best way to deal with hyperconnectivity is with its exact opposite, something that in last years is going missing: real human contact. In a corporate environment this means fostering internal networking opportunities for those employees that, otherwise, would never meet. To do so, large organisations have always relied on team building activities and enterprise social networks. These solutions, while being very effective for other purposes (corporate culture and document sharing), are not very useful to boost the creation of new links between colleagues.

Woobe provides an innovative solution: campaigns of micro-events. Rather than organising a big event with 1000 people you will be able to organise 200 micro-events with 5 attendees each. Woobe’s algorithm randomly selects the attendees with a matchmaking system between the profiles set by the HR manager (department, seniority, etc) and the employees’ corporate agenda availability (Outlook or Gmail).

The attendees are going to meet new colleagues in a friendly and informal environment, such as a lunch or a footing after work, where real human contact is genuine and new links will be created. In this way, employees are going to be engaged in their worklife and they will avoid the traps of hyperconnectivity: stress, anxiety, burnout and depression.

Source: How to avoid the traps of hyperconnetivity – Woobe

The HR function is in the middle of a process which will change it forever

the-new-way-of-working

The New Way of Working (NWoW) is rising and the reasons behind this are in the latest trends in HR: Autonomy, Accountability, Flexibility and ICT.

Most companies are following or are planning to follow this trend, and for good reasons! But before speaking about the benefits, it is better to understand what this trends mean with some examples.

When we talk about autonomy we refer to the proliferation of small independent teams as well as virtual teams. Accountability refers to the empowerment of all the employees, while flexibility is well represented by telecommuting and home-working. ICT obviously concerns all the new tools that information technology offers to help us get work done.

NWoW is all that, but why should the HR implement it? The answer is because this holistic approach results in a better performance than each single trend considered; that is autonomy, accountability, flexibility and ICT are more effective if implemented all together.

So let’s talk about benefits, real advantages, something that make NWoW worth in the eyes of the executives.

Here are the three benefits in our opinion:

  • better productivity: because employees work more and better when they evaluated for the results they achieve, and not just for the time that they spend in the office;
  • more innovation: because if employees are more engaged at work they will feel more involved and go the extra mile to find new ideas
  • more attractive: for the best talents on the market, the future generation (aka Millennials) will be asking jobs which offers this features, so NWoW is the key to attract the best employee of tomorrow.

The road to NWoW is paved also with some challenges to overcome:

  • loss of social links: remote work can reduce the relationships between the employees;
  • less collaboration: open spaces can make collaboration more difficult;
  • individualisation: can occur if the employees are obsessed with their goals;
  • silo mentality: when thinking of silo mentality people will most of the time think of a lack communication between departments, yet it is not that simple and it requires an in depth analysis.

Silo Mentality

Silo mentality is a mind-set present when certain departments or sectors do not wish to share information with others in the same company. This type of mentality will reduce efficiency in the overall operation, reduce morale, and may contribute to the demise of a productive company culture.

Traditionally organizational structures were set up with silos to enable specialization towards a specific activity. In the 20th century this method was successful because managers focused on their efforts and rarely had to take in consideration the organization’s other activities. This is no longer applicable nor efficient in today’s ever-changing, fast-moving and information craving workplaces.

Organizations need to get away from the silo mentality because coordination across departments is where opportunities to create efficiency, change, and innovation lie.

But how could it be prevented, not just once but in a systematic way?

First and foremost, it’s to the management and leaders to generate cross-silos efficiency by addressing contextual issues at the heart of the organization. All collaborators will need to have a common goal to advance in the same direction. Once the management is set on the right track, they still need to find a way to engage and motivate the teams towards the goals.

Secondly, it is necessary to find a coherent and systematic solution to reach out to the departments and be able to select the people that need to meet each other. Chances are that the silo mentality will dissipate as more people doing a variety of jobs with different mind-sets start to understand each other’s mutual reality.

Solutions

To complete the overview on the current situation I am going to describe what the companies are currently doing, the usual solutions, to break the silo mentality.

The three main solutions which most companies are putting in place are: team building activities, enterprise social networks and company’s dinners.

All these solutions have proven to be reliable for many years, but it is finally time to expose their limits: they are gathering always the same usual attendees, they are very hard to organize and manage because too many people are involved, and often people tend to regroup with their team without having any contacts with the other colleagues. Furthermore, these current solutions fall short as far as participation rate and employees’ engagement are concerned, and at the end of the day Silo mentality will be still an issue.

So the question is: how to go beyond these limits and, at the same time, drive high participation rates and employees’ engagement? Well, the answer is “frequent micro-events”, that is events which are repeated several times in a given time frame and with a small number of attendees.

In this manner the HR manager can improve cross-silo contacts, get high participation rate and solid employees engagement.

Admin Costs

Yet organising these kind of events might be quite difficult for large companies, with hundreds or thousands of employees. The HR will be overwhelmed by the number of variables involved to plan the events… and handling the last minute cancellations might be even worse. They need the right tool to help them complete this task.

Woobe for instance, is a tool that will give HR a the possibility to organize long-term and specifically designed small-group events over large groups of individuals.

It is an effective, long-term and scalable solution that can design inter- or intra-department campaigns with different objectives and separate goals. With only few clicks, and in less than 5 minutes, the HR will create a campaign. Woobe will send automatic invitations to employees, according to their calendar availabilities and the criteria defined, such as department, age, seniority, etc. What Woobe is not is “yet another tool” for the employees: they will receive invitations in their regular “outlook” calendar.

With Woobe, a company can easily and economically organize micro events to break down the silo mentality, initiate a sense of cohesion and a corporate spirit that will drive success.

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