Corporate Education in the 21st Century

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BERLIN, January 31, 2017 – In this constantly changing world, companies have been striving to keep up with the pace of the dynamic business environment. This isn’t possible without reshaping their learning capabilities – creating new corporate and personal learning environments in order to attract, develop and re-engage their workforces.

Unlike traditional training and development programs, corporate universities offer opportunities for development with a strategic focus, reflecting company priorities and anticipating change.

Seeing corporate learning and corporate universities as a must-have strategic asset and being responsive to the latest corporate learning trends, Fleming. has organized its 7th Annual Corporate Le@rning & Corporate Universities Summit.

Experts from Google Fiber, Deutsche Telekom, Hilton Worldwide, Gazprom International, ING IT Academy, ABN AMRO Bank, GlobalCCU and others will gather on 7 – 9 June 2017 in Mercure Hotel Moa, Berlin, Germany, to build a roadmap to true 21st century learning.

During the two interactive days, attendees will have the opportunity to discuss continuous investments in educational technologies, digital disruption, enhancing learner engagement, adaptive & agile learning, content curation & contextualization and the new roles of corporate universities.

On June 7, Stefaan van Hooydonk, Flipkart, India, and Martijn Rademakers, Center for Strategy & Leadership, Netherlands, will lead a half-day workshop on reinventing corporate learning and university. They offer expert advice on how to turn a learning department into a corporate university and make it a strategic business partner.

This event will be co-located with the HR Transformation Forum.

The full event program may be downloaded here

About Fleming.

Fleming. connects great people, useful know-how and valuable opportunities. With 13 years in the business and 300+ events organized annually, Fleming. has grown to offer a portfolio of Conferences, Trainings, Exhibitions, Blended Learning and Online Conferences. Present on five continents, Fleming. has partnerships to always stay one step ahead. More than 50,000 satisfied companies participating at our events every year prove that Fleming. is the right partner. For more information, visit www.fleming.events.

Contact:

Martina Hrabinska
Marketing Manager
Fleming.
T: +421 257 272 145
F: +421 255 644 490
E: martina.hrabinska@fleming.events
W: www.fleming.events

Capabiliti launches Wizards to ease the problem of technology adoption for training & assessments by SMBs

Capabiliti launches Wizards to ease the problem of technology adoption for training & assessments by SMBs

Wizards allow companies to tackle specific problems with DIY tools – rather than adopt a complete platform. Available for Single Use and subscription.

New Delhi, 17th January: Capabiliti – the platform promoted by Qustn Technologies has taken a completely new approach to solving some key problems faced by SMBs and Enterprises, and launched Capabiliti Wizards, a technology based device-agnostic platform that allows companies to put up their content seamlessly and train anyone on-the-go.

Elaborating on this development, Mrigank Tripathi, Founder and CEO of Qustn Technologies said, “There are many users who are evolved and comfortable with terms like LMS, mobile learning etc., but there are 10 times that many who just want to get their training problem solved. By launching Capabiliti Wizards, we hope to take away the need for anyone to be bothered with technical jargons or systems, rather just focus on solving your specific problem. The first wave solves the problems of sales, product and compliance trainings, as well as allows conducting critical ready-to-use assessments, surveys and feedback internally. We will continue to add more Wizards to solve other relevant training and engagement problems of SMBs. We have kept the product very affordable, and have been getting some great feedback on it”.

This decision has been taken post studying the data gathered through a research conducted across 1294 SMB decision makers. Over 987 of those surveyed didn’t use formal technology systems and weren’t very conversant with it. 523 of said they wanted to explore technology, but didn’t know how it fit in their present scenario. Two key findings came out very strongly.

Firstly, training the sales force on the product or offering – how to sell it, and how to communicate the features-advantages-benefits of the same in a manner that remained consistent down to the last mile. The second was standard or mandatory assessments that needed to be taken by multiple users. A third ancillary problem that came out was about the prevalent pricing model that hindered technology adoption. Almost every product uses a subscription based approach – and that’s sometimes a deterrent. With Capabiliti Wizards, you have the flexibility of using the product for a single use in case the requirement is sporadic, or taking a subscription approach.

Talking about the need for such a product, Abhishek Joshi, a Capabiliti user and Head L&D of IndiaMart, said, “I used to always struggle with trying to figure out how to update my sales team or conduct mandatory assessments – and till now, it used to be over phone calls and web demos, which didn’t always work given the need for everyone to be available at the same time. Further – it didn’t allow me to track every individual user. It was more like face to face training, without the actual understanding of who is ready to sell and who isn’t. Capabiliti Wizards solves all of that and provides reports on the training progress.”

Sachin Grover, CTO and co-founder of Qustn Technologies said, “Platforms use a linear approach. Input, Processing & Output. What we came to realize is that most people needed help in performing these critical tasks. Also, there are barely any Google searches for technical solutions – but there are many for specific problems like ‘Sales training’ or ‘product training’. People need assistance, and that’s what Wizards is – an approach to remove the problems that are faced by SMBs to conduct trainings and assessments.”.

About Capabiliti

Capabiliti is used by companies of all sizes to enhance their productivity by ensuring the sales and service teams are consistently trained, assessed and engaged, through its mobile-first platform.

Backed by marquee investors such as 500 Startups, Rajan Anandan, Kunal Bahl and Girish Matrubootham; Qustn Technologies launched Capabiliti in 2015.

Awarded by Gartner, NASSCOM, IBM, Microsoft, and YourStory, Capabiliti is used by leading  enterprises including Flipkart, Indus Towers, Airtel. For more information on Capabiliti, visit capabiliti.co.

Contact

To learn more about Capabiliti, please contact

Ankit Sindhi
Digital Marketing, Qustn Technologies
+91-98181 03682
ankit@qustn.com

How Tech Is Reshaping ‘Business As Usual’

Kyle Martin, Florida Polytechnic University

Written by Kyle Martin, Content Coordinator at Florida Polytechnic University. Specially for The HR Tech Weekly®.

Change is the only constant, and it’s only accelerating. Technology is taking us closer and closer to the futuristic worlds we once only imagined in science fiction, but questions remain. How is innovative technology changing the way we do business? How will it continue to change in years to come? Keep an eye on the following trends that will continue to reshape business as we know it and introduce brand new STEM careers:

The Machines: They’re Learning!

Artificial Intelligence is more than a buzzword; it’s real and it’s happening now. Systems that can learn and adapt are becoming part of numerous industries, from Salesforce’s analytics service to products like crystal for marketing. Intelligent systems apply learning from one user to improve all users’ experience. (This is rumored to also be coming in digital assistant Siri’s future). Natural language processing allows us to consult AI programs like we would another person, asking questions like “When should I post on Instagram for maximum engagement?” and receive a more accurate answer faster than ever before.

IoT Integration

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a revolution in connectivity; items and devices equipped with sensors and controllers can now communicate with one another. These smart machines assist with everything from household chores to improving supply chain management, and they relay pertinent information about user behavior and machine processes.

Improving supply chain efficiencies is a growing application of the IoT. The IoT allows supply chain managers to meticulously track products and make smarter decisions based on pre-programmed parameters. The IoT also produces real-time data, allowing consumers to know exactly when their packages will arrive, and supply chain managers an understanding of how well each facet of their supply chain is performing.

The IoT offers numerous benefits for managers and consumers alike. Managers can better understand system bottlenecks and prevent machine breakdown. Consumers have the satisfaction of knowing they can monitor their shipment in real-time. While the upfront cost of integrating intelligent machines might initially turn companies off, their ability to improve operations make them more economical in the long term.

New Levels of Co-Creation

One of the many benefits of the Internet is its capacity for widespread collaboration. Today, that collaboration is going one step further. Many companies are now leveraging co-creation, allowing consumers to contribute to the development of new products and services. This new level of cooperation between brands and their buyers empowers consumers to create the exact product or service they need. In return, businesses reduce the costs associated with assessing the current product market and determining what to produce next.

This theme of co-creation also includes companies hiring freelance specialists. Companies are no longer compromising the quality of their employees, and ultimately their business, because of geographic distance. With virtually no more borders or geographic limitations, this new trend is altering the way businesses hire and retain employees.

In the face of a rapidly evolving market, more job seekers are choosing technology-focused degree programs to keep their skills sharp and their knowledge up-to-date. Why? Because business owners and professionals must stay ahead of the changing technology tides in order to ensure continued success.

About the Author:

Kyle Martin brings 11 years of storytelling experience to the content coordinator position at Florida Polytechnic University. In this role, Martin develops original content showcasing the University experience as a way to attract new students and faculty. He also lends editorial direction to University departments launching new projects and campaigns.


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10 Most Popular Articles of 2016 About HR, HR Tech, Recruitment and Beyond

Human Touch in Digital

The HR Tech Weekly® is happy to present you the list of 10 most popular articles in our blog in 2016. The entire rank is made based on the number of views and social shares. The competition was severe but fair. Some of our favorite article got behind. But there were only ten slots available.

We did not include in the list our own listicles and third parties ranks like Top 10 HR Tech Influencers on Twitter and some others despite of they were quite popular among the audience.

Some great articles from the beginning of the year did not compete well with those from the second half. We treat it as a technical error as the blog itself was less popular that time.

Nevertheless, after careful consideration and precise calculation we’ve got the following list of readers choices, and here we go:

  1. Recruiting Secrets LinkedIn Doesn’t Want You To Know, by Ninh Tran

Today, only pockets of the tech industry still enjoy significant growth and hiring volumes, for example, autonomous vehicles, augmented and virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and deep learning. To satisfy hiring teams, talent acquisition professionals must find better and more creative ways to reach premier talent and generate their interest for the right opportunity. Can LinkedIn be an excellent recruiting channel to connect the right people with the right roles?

  1. What you need to know about Agile Performance Management, by Yatin Pawar

Agile performance management is a collaborative, continuous feedback and development practice that is steadily replacing traditional performance management.

Traditional performance management has proven to be insufficient to assess and enhance an employee’s contribution. Its primary focus is setting up a series of processes to measure the employee’s performance over the whole year. These processes end up having an unanticipated effect of managers focusing on employee’s weaknesses.

  1. The Future of Recruiting and Hiring with AI, by Noel Webb

The buzz around artificial intelligence this year is being shrugged off by many as just a new word HR got ahold of, but what would happen if AI was actually embraced by the recruiting and hiring world? What could it do to further practices and solve problems?

  1. HR Tech Is So Dynamic and Still Has Very Much a Work in Progress, Q & A with Bill Kutik

As for being on the other side of the table… being a good interviewer means taking second chair to the person being interviewed. Teasing out and highlighting what they know. Since much of what I do are interviews and panels (except for my columns), I don’t get to do much of the talking. So I love whenever the roles are reversed!

  1. The HR function is in the middle of a process which will change it forever, by Marco Pastore

The New Way of Working (NWoW) is rising and the reasons behind this are in the latest trends in HR: Autonomy, Accountability, Flexibility and ICT.

Most companies are following or are planning to follow this trend, and for good reasons! But before speaking about the benefits, it is better to understand what this trends mean with some examples.

  1. What LinkedIn’s Buyout with Microsoft means for the Talent Acquisition Technology Ecosystem, by Brian Delle Donne

While critics point to Microsoft acquisition failures like Nokia and Yammer, neither one of those companies open up the ability for increased ad revenue, user interaction data or video conferencing abilities.

  1. Building a Culture of Confidence, by Lisa Feigen Dugal

Confidence and competence: Two invaluable characteristics to possess in today’s professional environment. While these traits have different meanings, they are inextricably linked. Consistent research findings show men tend to overestimate their competence while women underestimate it, yet research has also shown that women tend to be more effective, and more competent, leaders.

  1. 5 Reasons Why Big Data Analytics Degrees Are Worth It, by Lauren Willison

Due in large part to the rapid growth of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, big data analytics is approaching new heights. Students who pursue a degree in big data analytics learn how to effectively analyze large sets of data and identify patterns, connections and other pertinent details revealed by data. Companies are increasingly turning to data analytics to harness customer insights, and ultimately, produce better business decisions. As a result, big data analysts are in high demand and the data analytics field is showing no signs of slowing down.

  1. Great Companies Are Built Around Great People, by Annie Jordan

There is a lot of truth in the saying that great companies are built upon great people. However, the reality is, of course, more complicated than that. The world’s leading companies are a powerful blend of people, vision, capability and culture. These things work together like the mechanics of a rocket, generating and maintaining irresistible momentum.

  1. How You Can Improve Customer Experience With Fast Data Analytics, by Ronald van Loon

In today’s constantly connected world, customers expect more than ever before from the companies they do business with. With the emergence of big data, businesses have been able to better meet and exceed customer expectations thanks to analytics and data science. However, the role of data in your business’ success doesn’t end with big data – now you can take your data mining and analytics to the next level to improve customer service and your business’ overall customer experience faster than you ever thought possible.

Featured articles:

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50+ Online Sources for HR Managers, Part 2

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The new exciting year is ahead and we are looking forward to serve you with the best content. We wish you useful and productive reading with us! Stay tuned and we’ll be back…


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Capabiliti beats 96 LMS apps globally at GetApp SaaS Summer Games ’16

Written by Ankit Sindhi | Originally published at The Qustn Cafe 

We’re pleased to announce that Capabiliti – your very own training and engagement platform by Qustn Technologies – has won the bronze medal at the GetApp SaaS Summer Games 2016 for the LMS category.

For those who do not know, GetApp, a Gartner owned company, is an ecosystem of business apps and software platforms such as learning management systems.

GetApp designed the SaaS summer games to find out the most popular SaaS software from the top SaaS companies globally in six different, most popular business app categories, viz. Accounting Software, Social Media Marketing Software, Learning Management System, Employee Scheduling Software, Business Intelligence, and Marketing Automation Software.

Here are the top 5 business apps from the Learning Management System category:

The Qualification Criteria

Apart from the base criteria of being listed on GetApp along with hundreds of other contenders, medals were awarded to SaaS platforms based on the average GetApp user review score of all applications in a given category, as on August 9, 2016.

Moreover, a software must have a minimum of 10 user reviews to qualify, with the gross number of user reviews for an app being the deciding mechanism in case of a tie between 2 apps on the score.

How Capabiliti Won

This win for Capabiliti coincides with the platform crossing a million training and engagement transactions on it for the second quarter running this financial year.

Clients use Capabiliti for employee feedback, training needs analysis, running contests and surveys, improving overall engagement and much more, apart from training and assessing their employees.

Here is what some of the Capabiliti users had to say, that contributed to our rankings:

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ss3.pngSource: Capabiliti Reviews on GetApp.com

Mrigank Tripathi, Founder and CEO of Qustn Technologies – the makers of Capabiliti, personally thanked each and every Capabiliti user who supported Capabiliti and came out to express their delight on GetApp in the form of reviews. “Next year, we’re gunning for gold!” he exclaims.

I’ll take a second here and direct any interested users to try out Capabiliti for training, engagement and experience the next level of business intelligence in terms of HR right now!

Country Wise Leaderboard

Capabiliti is the only app from India that made it to the top 3 in this category. Here are the country-wise rankings according to the data provided by GetApp:

What do you think about these app evaluations? How big (or small) a role do they play in influencing your purchase decisions? Tell us!

About the Author:

Ankit SindhiAnkit Sindhi is a digital marketer with Qustn Technologies. He tries hard not to sell his wares when he writes, and often succeeds. When not at work, he is busy networking, playing music, reading, and traveling.


Source: Capabiliti beats 96 LMS apps globally at GetApp SaaS Summer Games ’16

Three Findings from Deloitte’s “Global Human Capital Trends 2016 Report” for Recruiters

Deloitte’s Global Human Capital Trends 2016:

Over the past few years major disruptions have occurred in HR and corporate structures and organizations. Recently, Deloitte conducted a comprehensive global study of human capital trends and published those findings in a robust report titled: Global Human Capital Trends (GHCT) 2016–The New Organization: Different by Design. According to the researchers, “Sweeping global forces are reshaping the workplace, the workforce, and work itself.” The findings in this report are incredibly relevant and important for professional recruiters to be aware of and potentially take action on.

The data were compiled from more than 7,000 survey responses from corporate leaders in over 130 countries around the world. This blog post will present a few of the highlights from the report that will impact recruiting/hiring now and in the future.

The knowledge and wisdom gained from this study are two-fold for recruiting agencies, corporate recruiters, executive search firms, and/or legal search firms: (1) The study offers ideas for how recruiting agencies might want to run their businesses, and (2) The investigation provides many ‘nuggets’ of information into how your potential customers are running their organizations. If you have this knowledge it can only help you gain an advantage in the hyper-competitive world of professional recruiting. Part of running a successful business is truly understanding the ‘business challenges’ that your customers face on a daily basis.

The researchers begin by identifying 4 overarching changes that are affecting corporate structures: Demographic shifts (50-60% of workforce are millennials); Pressure for Increased Speed for Time to Market (rapid disruption of business models); Digital everywhere; and a Different Social Contract for Workers.

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The top 10 trends identified were: Organizational Design, Leadership, CultureEngagement, Learning, Design ThinkingChanging Skills of the HR OrganizationPeople Analytics, Digital HR, and Workforce Management.

Three of these trends (Organizational design, Culture, and Engagement) will be discussed. After summarizing the high points of the report on these three key trends I’ll point out ways these items will specifically impact recruiting and talent management.

Organizational Design & Structure

One key point of departure identified, in the study, was significant changes in organizational structure. The authors concur, “as companies strive to become more agile and customer-focused, organizations are shifting their structures from traditional, functional models toward interconnected, flexible teams.” Another way to think about the trend toward teams would be viewing them through the prism of a Hollywood movie production team and less like traditional corporate structures. Essentially, akin to a movie-set, people are coming together to tackle projects, then disbanding and moving on to new assignments once the project is complete.

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The implication for professional recruiters is re-thinking your organizational design in order to parlay the benefits of teams instead of the more traditional structure focused primarily on individuals doing specific tasks. In other words, professional recruiters would be encouraged to work together to connect talented people with amazing opportunities, instead of working ‘alone’ to achieve these goals (presumably working individually on a list of candidates and clients).

Here are a few suggestions that the GHCT study offers:

  • Looking at your organizations design: think about re-organization that includes “mission-driven” teams focused on customers, markets, or products. Perhaps it makes sense to assign a ‘team’ of recruiters/hiring managers to work on one specific job type or talent pool.
  • Critically analyzing your rewards and goals: think about your performance management around ‘team performance’ and ‘team leadership’ rather than focusing solely on individual performance. Moreover, reward people for project results, collaboration, and helping others. If a team is assigned to find talent for a specific client incentivize a team of 5 to get 25 placements done this quarter (instead of placing the task of each individual recruiter to get 5 placements on their own).
  • Implementing new team-based tools: put in place tools and measurement systems that encourage people to move between teams, and share information and collaborate with other teams. For recruiters this would mean structuring your firm in a way that encourages team members to work together to achieve company-wide goals for placements. Also, this would encourage communication and networking to ensure that the entire team/company is being successful.
  • Allowing teams to set their own goals: teams should be held accountable for results – but let them decide how to perform, socialize, and communicate these goals among the team. Instead of managers mandating what the goals are, allow the teams to collectively and creatively come up with ways to be held to account for their performance measurable’s.

Shaping Culture

Another vital trend in this study was the impact of culture on business strategy. The authors define culture as, “the way things work around here”. Also, culture is the system of values, beliefs, and behaviors that shape how real work gets done within an organization. As opposed to seeing culture as primarily an HR issue/problem, “CEOs and executive teams should take responsibility for an organization’s culture (with HR supporting that responsibility through measurement, process, and infrastructure).” Leaders should embody and actively engage in the kind of ‘culture’ they want their teams to reflect.

Interestingly, 28% of survey respondents believe they understand their culture well, while only 19% believe they have the ‘right culture.’ Change is so prevalent for organizations in 2016 that an effective culture can be the determining factor for if an entity can successfully weather the storms of change.

The implication for recruiters, in terms of culture, is ensuring that the executive leadership – in conjunction with HR – has thought deeply about the system of values, beliefs, and behaviors that shapes how placements are made within your recruiting agency. What are some ‘universal’ cultural values that your firm places a great deal of faith in? What types of qualities do you want your recruiters to look for as they place people? More specifically, GHCT encourages the following:

  • Prioritizing culture by CEO’s: Executives must clearly understand their company’s cultural values, determine how they connect to business strategy, and take responsibility for shaping them. Also, executives should routinely take their own inventory and analyze whether their own behaviors reinforce the desired culture.
  • Understanding both the current and desired culture: critical for leaders to examine current business practices to see how, and if, they align properly with desired culture. If there are practices that are counter-productive they should be thrown out and new ones implemented that edify the desired culture.
  • Measuring culture: Use empirical tools to understand employee attitudes and actions. HR should take the lead in this effort and get the results back to leaders for assessment (in a timely manner).

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Engagement – Always On

And finally, yet another trend identified in this study was employee engagement (which is closely tied to culture). Engagement is, “how people feel about the way things work around here.” The researchers also note that engagement is, “…a strong focus on listening to employees, workforce health and well-being, job redesign, and an enterprise-wide analysis of all dimensions of employee engagement.” Most companies still only evaluate engagement on an annual basis (64%), but in order to be truly effective managers and leaders should, “be proactive, implement the right tools, and give business leaders a continuous stream of data … and promote a culture of listening, and ensure that reward systems are consistent with engagement and retention goals.” True engagement means being ‘always on’ and continuously listening for what employees want and need from their jobs.

Engagement is also crucial because millennials are less loyal to organizations than ever before. Additionally, companies are tasked with a continued need to attract workers with technological and other specialized skills (as all companies digitize their businesses). And, finally, an organization’s employment brand is now open and transparent, so job candidates can easily see if a company is a great place to work (think of all of the “Best Place to Work” lists that are routinely populated on social media channels).

For professional recruiters the trend toward engagement can be meaningful in at least a couple of different ways. One, engaging all recruiters/hiring managers in effective ways can improve the culture/engagement/loyalty of team members. And, two, understanding the employee engagement of your customers (i.e., companies you are working to place candidates with) can aid in having successful placements where the candidate and the customer are both satisfied with the ‘marriage’. The researchers conclude:

  • inspirational201631Redefining engagement: By moving past the notion of turning your organization into a great place to work; also means “reaching down to the team and individual levels to foster highly engaged teams of employees doing work they love to do”.
  • Creating a sense of passion, purpose, and mission: Providing free perks can be nice, but companies that succeed in having highly engaged employees focus on driving meaning, purpose, and passion among their workers.
  • Linking compensation to engagement: Managers must get on board with tying team leaders’ compensation to their team members’ engagement. This sends a powerful signal and drives a sense of accountability about engagement efforts.
  • Doing “stay” interviews: In addition to having ‘exit’ interviews to find out why employees are leaving, also use ‘stay’ interviews to learn what it would take for an employee to stay at a company.

This article has outlined 3 of the 10 trends that the Global Human Capital Trends 2016 Report covers. More highlights to come regarding HR trends that will no doubt have long-lasting impacts on professional recruiters. Suffice to say, the landscape of work is changing rapidly and it is critical that professional recruiters are aware of the trends and adapt their businesses accordingly.

For more information on this study check out the Full Report.


Source: Three Findings from Deloitte’s “Global Human Capital Trends 2016 Report” for Recruiters – Crelate

5 Reasons Why Big Data Analytics Degrees Are Worth It

Careers in Big Data

Due in large part to the rapid growth of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, big data analytics is approaching new heights. Students who pursue a degree in big data analytics learn how to effectively analyze large sets of data and identify patterns, connections and other pertinent details revealed by data. Companies are increasingly turning to data analytics to harness customer insights, and ultimately, produce better business decisions. As a result, big data analysts are in high demand and the data analytics field is showing no signs of slowing down. Here are five reasons why earning a degree in big data analytics pays off.

The Thriving Field

More and more universities are offering degrees in big data analytics to adjust to the growing job demand and close the skills gap, or in other words, produce more employable talent who can glean useful insights from big data. With massive amounts of data being produced daily, it’s no wonder why data analysts are in such high demand. Large corporations, such as Microsoft and IBM, analyze and leverage data in order to extract more information about clients. IBM, for example, divides clients by certain commonalities—such as industry, company size and revenue—to better segment prospects and create highly effective marketing campaigns.

A Generous Earning Potential

A career in big data is a lucrative career choice, with the national average salary for data-related careers hovering in the mid-90s (PayScale). Additionally, scientific and technical services, information technologies, retail, sustainability and professional services are often the leading industries in terms of having the most job openings in big data analytics.

Highly Rewarding for Business and Employees

Big data analysts typically wear several hats within an organization, but they focus on one key principle: to help companies make better business decisions by revealing useful insights from data. As a result, this is a highly esteemed position for any business professional, and one that is commonly cited as being both rewarding and satisfying.

Real-World Training and Preparation

Improvements in programming technology and graph databases, such as Neo4j, are continuing to transform the data analytics field and how data can be used. Companies around the world are recognizing more and more benefits of data analysis, and rely heavily on big data analysts to execute the job. As a result, many of the nation’s top engineering colleges are putting more emphasis on real-world experience inside the classroom, by supplementing classwork with hands-on training and lab work.

Join an Elite Pool of Talent

In order to succeed in a big data analytics career, it’s essential to have a deep understanding of science and mathematics—but that’s not all. The field also incorporates advanced knowledge of decision analysis and data mining, and it requires critical thinking and problem-solving to truly understand the information at hand. With this in mind, students can expect to work alongside some of the brightest and most talented peers. By collaborating with these individuals, students can gain a new perspective and understanding of complex topics.

For students looking for a career with a promising future, earning a degree in big data analytics is certainly a great option; big data analytics is a field with unlimited potential for growth and discovery.

About the Author

Lauren WillisonAs the Director of Admissions at Florida Polytechnic University, Lauren Willison is responsible for supporting the Vice Provost of Enrollment in managing recruitment efforts. She develops and coordinates on- and off-campus events, as well as manages the campus visit experience.


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What Organizations Need to Understand About Their Millennial Workforce

millennials-writing

Whiny, impatient, hard-to-please, disloyal – these are some of the adjectives associated with millennials at the workplace. This generation born between 1980 and 1996 has also been identified as job hoppers and the hardest to retain. Companies of all kinds are obsessed with understanding millennials better. The Global Human Capital Trends Report, 2016 also stated the rise of millennial workforce as a demographic upheaval, which is a major force of global change in the talent landscape.

The truth is – this particular lot of the population has more or less the same needs as their older generations. In fact, a study by IBM debunked most of the myths associated with millennials. It showed that they actually want the same things from their workplace like their older generations (except for a few differences in matters such as retirement plans!).

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But why are they still hopping jobs? 21% of millennial workers had left their jobs in the last year to do something else. Gallup has found that millennials struggle to find good jobs that engage them. In fact, millennials are the generation with the highest rates of unemployment and underemployment in the US. The problem of engagement is even severe with only 29% of employed millennials being engaged at work.

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The only explanation to this is that they are clearly not getting what they want. It’s not that the millennials have a completely different view of the world as compared to the older generations, or are asking for too much. With the digital wave setting in and technology being readily available to this generation, organizations need to understand what exactly is expected out of them.

This is extremely critical as the presence of millennials in the US is huge. They are going to make up 40% of the workforce by 2020 and 75% by 2025 (as per the U.S. Bureau of Statistics project). If such a major part of a generation is not engaged at work, the cost of it will also be huge! As per Gallup, millennial turnover costs the U.S, economy $30.5 billion annually. At the same time, 60% of millennials are open to new job opportunities – this basically means that for businesses, half of their millennial workforce doesn’t see a future with them.

As per Gallup, the following things set millennials apart from other generations:

  1. They really care about their job roles and view them as stepping stones and growth opportunities to their larger goals. 52% of millennials cite career progression as their first priority, followed by competitive salaries (PwC).
  2. They are deeply committed to what they do professionally.
  3. They do not want to work for bosses, but for coaches who invest and contribute to their personal and professional development.
  4. They want more than free beers and a fun workplace as opposed to Baby Boomers and GenXers – they need to be convinced why and how an organization will help them learn, grow and develop and further their careers.
  5. They want an emotional and behavioral connection with their jobs.
  6. They want a high level of well-being – be able to spend on things that they want, rather on things they should have. Work life balance is key for them and they aren’t getting it. As per a PwC research 28% of millennial respondents said that their work life balance was worse than they expected before joining.

What Millennials Want from Performance Management

Performance management is a very critical area for most companies to crack as it defines the relationship between a manager and an employee. Millennials want coaches over bosses, and they can only stick to an organization that gives them managers who would potentially invest and contribute to their personal and professional growth. Like any relationship to succeed, communication is crucial here as well. Millennials are hungry for frequent and consistent communication and feedback from their managers. Level of manager involvement is directly proportional to the level of engagement that a millennial employee might have:

IMG 1

Lack of feedback – The reason for disengagement in this regard is also clear with statistics, as only 21% of millennials meet their managers on a weekly basis (Gallup). The exchange of feedback is low. Regular meetings, along with frequent feedback can lead to more engagement and better performance for teams as well as companies as a whole. Performance management needs to be a process spread over a year, rather than a year end discussion which focuses on assigning a number, which clearly is not holistic in nature.

Lack of flexible options – Along with feedback, millennials also wants flexibility at their workplace and move beyond the 9 to 5 cycle of drudgery. 77% of millennials say that flexible work hours are key to boosting productivity (Gallup). They love the idea of being able to work from any location with technology easily available – 39% of millennials believe that more options to work remotely would result in higher productivity.

Leadership and Millennials

89% of organizations cite leadership as one of their top challenges.

~ Global Human Capital Trends Report , 2016

Millennials bring high expectations to a workplace and they look for a recipe that gives them a rewarding, purposeful work experience, combined with constant learning and development opportunities that steers their career progression. Leaders and people managers are the most important stakeholders for driving engagement. HR managers should support leaders in creating an engaged environment at workplace. Leaders who motivate and coach their subordinates, who in turn motivate and engage theirs, are a key ingredient in creating a culture of engagement that sustains business results in a highly dynamic global environment. HR managers should demonstrate investment in helping leaders focus on building skills, empowering their colleagues as well as motivate individuals to ensure that they drive their own engagement.

In the Deloitte Millennial Survey 2016, 39 % of millennial respondents pointed to leadership as one of the most sought after aspects at the workplace. They also believe that businesses are not doing enough to bridge the gap and ensure that a new generation of business leaders is created. The survey also revealed that 71% of those millennials who are likely to leave their current company in the next two years are unhappy with how their leadership skills are being developed.

As per the Global Human Capital Trends report 2016, only 7% of surveyed respondents reported to have accelerated leadership programs for millennials. 28% of respondents reported weak or very weak leadership pipelines. And 21% of companies have no leadership programs at all! Many organizations are still finding it difficult to identify potential leaders and develop them, despite heavy investment being done to achieve the same.

On-the-job Training Opportunities

30% of executives see learning as the primary driver of employee development in the Global Human Capital Trends Report, 2016. Professional growth within the company is possible through learning and customized and blended training programs – which is something the young workforce is desperately looking for. Millennials have reported that they will move elsewhere if employers fail to provide learning opportunities to them. What needs to be done here is that employees need to be viewed as customers who long for satisfaction, rather than being treated as students who are pressurized into traditional classroom methodologies. This is the generation who loves exploiting the power of technology and mobile devices, and if learning programs are not aligned with these wants, they are most likely to leave that organization.

Millennials and other young employees have grown in a self-directed learning environment and have been exposed to the internet from an early stage. In fact, 85% of millennials access internet from their phones. They get most of the information they need from their mobile devices and 93% of millennials use social media to connect with their friends and family, as opposed to 84% in older generations. This is why they expect access to dynamic learning opportunities that fit their individual needs and schedules, as well as suit their talent and interests.

The digital wave has hit the world and the millennials want to take advantage of it. They want to be able to be on the move and work remotely. In fact, as per a study by PWC, 41% of miilennials prefer to communicate electronically at work than face to face or even over telephone.

What Organizations Need to Do

  • Help millennials grow: Only 28 percent of millennials feel that their current organizations are making ‘full use’ of the skills they currently have to offer (Deloitte Millennial Survey, 2016).

Managers need to really understand the personal and professional goals of millennials. Understand the areas that interest these passionate people and offer them opportunities in the same.

  • Mentoring: As per the Deloitte Millennial Survey, 2016, among those millennials who have somebody acting as a mentor, 83% are satisfied with this aspect of their working lives.

Millennials want and value frequent feedback unlike annual reviews that dominated in the past. They are more than willing to know how they are doing on a regular basis and expect real time feedback. Organizations need to make continuous feedback a major part of their engagement strategy.

  • Encourage learning: Millennials are hungry for knowledge and they want to experience as much as training as possible. Organizations need to focus deeply on this aspect and build and measure the effectiveness of learning programs, along with mentoring programs. Technology plays a key role here as it allows L&D professionals to play with the way they want training to happen, and also retain the interest of this young lot by providing them with innovative learning options. A lot of technological innovations have come up that have helped organizations train their staff as well as measure the effectiveness of their programs. Capabiliti by Qustn is one such product that has helped L&D professionals connect learning with their business goals. See how.
  • Focus on culture over profit: Millennials give more importance to people and culture over monetary aspects. Corporate values that are shared with and believed by millennials also promote loyalty—particularly when employers demonstrate a strong sense of company purpose beyond financial success. Those likely to remain longest share their organization’s values, and are more satisfied with its sense of purpose and support of professional development.
  • Flexible options: Currently, millennials lack flexible options as 77% wish to have greater mobile connectivity, such as via tablets and smartphones (Deloitte Millennial Survey, 2016). Lack of remote working options is also serving as the greatest gap between current supply and demand surrounds the issue of remote working—fully 75 percent would like to start to, or more frequently, work from home or other locations where they feel more productive. If organizations work around providing such options to millennials, it will definitely increase their levels of satisfaction and boost productivity.

About the Author

Bhaswati BhattacharrayaBhaswati is a Product Specialist at Capabiliti, a mobile-first training and engagement solution for enterprises. Passionate about Economics, Bhaswati also loves storytelling. She has a keen interest in start-ups, food and travel. In her ‘me time’ she picks up fiction novels, tries different cuisines or explores routes to less traveled places on the world map. Follow her on Twitter at @Bhaswatibh


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Recruiting Secrets LinkedIn Doesn’t Want You To Know

How to Recruit on LinkedIn

How To Recruit On LinkedIn, Fast, Without Breaking The Bank

Recently I discussed the slowdown in tech hiring, which is already reflected in today’s longer and more difficult hiring cycles as hiring managers are more selective with the quality of candidates. Recruiting and job seeking has become significantly more challenging as offers are given out only to candidates who meet all requirements without fail. Sahat Yalkabov, a software engineer at Yahoo, was rejected multiple times describes this trend in his post “F*** You, I Quit — Hiring Is Broken.” I empathize with Sahat and others out there who are struggling to get offers. The environment of hiring and talent acquisition had changed from two years ago when Sahat got the gig on Yahoo. Back then almost every company needed to fill tens, sometimes hundreds of positions.

I empathize with Sahat and others out there who are struggling to get offers. The environment of hiring and talent acquisition had changed from two years ago when Sahat got the gig on Yahoo. Back then almost every company needed to fill tens, sometimes hundreds of positions.

Today, only pockets of the tech industry still enjoy significant growth and hiring volumes, for example, autonomous vehicles, augmented and virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and deep learning. To satisfy hiring teams, talent acquisition professionals must find better and more creative ways to reach premier talent and generate their interest for the right opportunity. Can LinkedIn be an excellent recruiting channel to connect the right people with the right roles?

Glassdoor
GlassDoor – HR and Recruiting Statistics for 2016

LinkedIn is a professional network where people connect, exchange ideas and expertise, manage relationships, and look for jobs. There are, however, two essential problems with recruiting on LinkedIn. It takes way too much time to reach the right candidate, and the response rate from people is very low, a lot lower than it used to.

Jason Webster, the current Head of Strategic Accounts Program at Glassdoor and Ex-Co-Founder of Ongig said: “The majority of my industry contacts tell me that their [InMail] response rate is between 10-20 percent. By contrast, colleagues from big-name companies like Google have said that they fetch a response rate of 70 percent using InMail. That seems to be an anomaly compared to the norm” (OnGiG). Why? Do Google recruiters have secret methodology or technology that gives them an unfair advantage? Is the Google brand so attractive in the minds of premier engineers?

No. With simple hacks, I had a 40 percent conversion for engineers currently working at Google and similar big-name companies to apply for jobs with sometimes unknown startups. So the answer must be in the recruiting, not the brand. I’ve cracked the code.

For the past couple of months, I have been recruiting top talent from Google, Apple, Cisco, Yahoo, LinkedIn, and successfully generating interest and applications for placements in early ventures. I achieved 41.3 percent response rate and 36.1 percent acceptance rate with 994 InMails in a month and a half which is 22 times the number of InMails for Recruiter Lite, while spending only $119.95/month for my subscription. What I am about to unveil is a working strategy with proven results to recruit premier candidates, both technical and non-technical, as an educational guide for talent acquisition professionals and hiring managers who compete for top talent with limited resources and limited time.

This LinkedIn sourcing strategy has been proven to work for front-end and back-end junior, iOS and Android, architects, DevOps, data scientists, full-stack, hardware and software engineers to senior engineers to staff engineers to CTOs, both general and highly specialized. It also works well for sales positions like corporate account executives, director-level product managers, junior and senior user experience and user interface designers. This strategy will work for any role except for those so specialized that only a few people in the world could do.

InMail Response Analytics
Personal InMail Analytics from 3/11/2016 to 4/29/2016

For a more accurate example beyond my InMail Analytics, I had a month to fill a tough role with a demanding hiring manager for a startup that only wanted to hire Googlers. To add to the challenge, after each of the first four onsite interviews, the hiring team changed the requirements for the role. Counting inbox responses (where responses are measured by those who willingly gave their contact information via LinkedIn message to further discuss the opportunity) confirms a response rate of 35.45 percent (39/110) from Googlers and Google-caliber engineering talent. Of those who responded, 59 percent applied for the position after the initial phone conversation.

Within a month, I had 23 relevant and quality candidates solely from sourcing on LinkedIn (Note that this is a lower bound overall, considering the stringent demands of the role). The hiring manager appreciated the candidates and this sourcing strategy, saying, “Thank you for providing a constant stream of quality candidates week after week.”

Other hiring managers’ experience was similar, with several asking questions like “How do you find so many fantastic candidates?” or “Where do you get these guys?” – because speed and quality matters.

For those not familiar with LinkedIn Recruiter products, Recruiter Lite accounts come with 30 InMails for $119.95/month. One can add 10 InMails for additional $100/month. LinkedIn Recruiter Corporate accounts come with 150 InMails for $899.95/month and for each 10 additional InMails it is $60/month.

How is it possible to send so many InMails without a LinkedIn Recruiter Corporate account and spending over $10,000 each month for InMails? A lot of LinkedIn “Power” Recruiters just connect to the person first and wait for the connection or wait for the email read confirmation or look for a sign of online activity before sending an InMail … a common best practice among Google and other top recruiters. Why? If the person does not want to connect with us in the first place, then the chances that they will respond favorably to a recruiter’s InMail is next to zero, wasting all those expensive InMails credits. According to the LinkedIn 2015 Global Talent Report about 51 percent of people on LinkedIn is somewhat interested or not interested to hear from a recruiter, whereas 43 percent are very interested.

The report also states that “followers [and by deduction your connections] are 81 percent more likely to respond to your InMails than those who do not follow you.” Pro Tip: Create a short post about the opportunity on your LinkedIn before sending invitations to connect.

InMail Tips
LinkedIn InMail Tips

It is possible to grow anyone’s LinkedIn from 0 connections to 3,000+ connections under one month without getting restricted by LinkedIn. Be very careful not to come across as a connect spammer. Have a genuine reason to justify the invite to connect with anyone to respect the LinkedIn Community Guidelines. I advise against any automated LinkedIn connection tools. High-volume connection invites should be controlled and limited to at the very most 200-300 invites per day and 3,000-4,000 invitations per month. I have been enjoying about 60 percent acceptance rates. Sending a connection request works as a probing signal to see whether that person is open to communicating or not. Clean up any one-month-old invitations every week in the LinkedIn Connect Hub.

The beginning of all sourcing begins with cleaning up and completing your LinkedIn profile to look and feel like a professional recruiter, or better yet executive search recruiter. Most people connect and respond to executive search recruiters even if they are not executive level yet. Make your profile and profile picture likable. Second, get the Boolean search optimization process down cold. If the Boolean search is a tough nut to crack, use tools that have Boolean search recommendation as a good starting point. Take on a data-driven approach to perfect the Boolean search by testing results and counting the accuracy, experimenting with the Boolean string, re-testing, and optimizing again. Here is an example Boolean string to search for Java Web Application Engineer on Spring/Groovy/Grails that shows 9 out of 10 relevant profiles.

Two pro tips: Bookmark the Boolean search to connect with more people another day. Use current title in the Boolean search to improve the results accuracy significantly. Do not use the default “current or past” parameter because combined with the negative keyword operator “NOT” it does not work as intended. For example, people with founder titles only in the present or only in the past will still show up in the search results. Beware of this small LinkedIn design flaw of not having “current and past” option.

Augmented LinkedIn Boolean Search Results
Augmented LinkedIn Boolean Search Results

While optimizing the Boolean search, you want to get 400 to at most 1,200 search results because LinkedIn results are capped at 10×100 results. Add more restrictions like zipcode-based location with radius or industry or current/past company or negative keywords when there are too many results. Relax restrictions or add relevant keywords if there are not that many results. LinkedIn’s search accuracy is capped by its technology, so no matter how complete the Boolean string is, the search results are never going to be 100 percent accurate.

For this strategy to work, hit at least 80-90 percent accuracy in the search results. Six degrees of separation explains the difference between first, second, and third connection on LinkedIn. Note that LinkedIn always shows first connections in the first couple of pages even though first connections are unselected. To experiment and improve the Boolean search, quickly glance over the first page’s results with second connections, then 10th and 20th-page results, and see if the titles are actually what you are looking for. If everything looks good, make a deeper check and review a couple of profiles randomly. Analytics speed up this whole process with domain expertise, years of experience, and peer ranking directly in the search results. Use negative keyword operator NOT (keyword1 OR keyword2) for not relevant titles or keywords that appear often.

To connect with people, use regular LinkedIn search. To reach out to the frist connections go to “View in Recruiter” from the search results. Under relationship filter apply “Any” to clear out the settings and then select “1st Connections.” The first people who connect are likely going to be active seekers, but after a few days, there will be enough first connections to whom we can send a free InMail.

Pro Tip: Save this search in a project to get notifications on people who just connected and we have not contacted yet. Another Pro tip: free InMails can be sent to second connections who have premium accounts. Review everyone’s profile before sending an InMail to make sure there is a good match. Use tools that augment profiles with further analytics for deeper review. To save time, craft an appealing and straightforward InMail template. Make sure it’s an upfront and killer message that encompasses all points that people care about.

What Impacts Job Seekers' Decisions

What Impacts by Age
Jobvite 2015 Job Seeker Nation: Inside the Mind of the Modern Job Seeker

Here is an example of a data-driven title that people appreciate: $180K + Equity + Mountain View, CA + Principal Software Engineer + Full Benefits + VISA Sponsor

This message encompasses all of the decision-making aspects of a job seeker, whether active or passive in the order of importance, and leaves only work life balance, flexibility, culture, and leadership undetermined. People often make the first decision based on their three to four priorities. Get those cleared up with the first message. Individuals who decline giving thanks for reaching out providing a reason like “I am happy where I am” or “just got a job not ready to make a move” etc. 87 percent of people who accept the InMail are interested in discussing the role because it already satisfies their core requirements, which could be salary, could be location, title, benefits, visa sponsorship. There are going to be a couple of people who ask whether the opportunity can be remote because to them working from home is a core priority. Whether they accept or decline, mostly everyone will want to keep in touch with us, because we are approaching talent as a recruiter who is trying to help them find a better job. Some tools can contribute to estimating people’s compensation and avoid awkward messages whenever the current salary is higher than offered.

Start the body of the message with something personalized. Use templates, but personalized the first line(s) of the message. Here are some good introductions – recognize their skill and experience or tell the person that we have shown their profile to one of our colleagues or one of the team members or the hiring manager who liked it. In this way, we will answer the questions that half of job seekers want to hear: “Are they looking for someone like me?”

CareerBuilder-1

CareerBuilder-2
CareerBuilder – Rethink the Candidate Experience and Make Better Hires

Crafting message content is the most important determinant of response rate from both premier candidates and passive seekers. It is the difference between 25 percent and 40+ percent positive response rate. Company branding matters. Just like candidate’s first impression matters to the interviewer, so does the company’s first impression in the minds of the candidate matter. What people read and feel from the message about a less-known business matter. Paint a picture of who the candidate would want to be, the best they can be, and how this opportunity will help them achieve it. Find something about our client’s company that we are excited and passionate about. Passion sells and the message should sell, hard. Anything and everything that is exceptional about the company should be briefly mentioned in the message. Is the team made of all Stanford Ph.D. data scientists? Is the CEO a very successful entrepreneur? Is the product meaningful? Does the company’s mission touch our hearts?

Find the reasons why we would want to accept the offer for the presented opportunity ourselves. Keep the message short and sweet, add a little mystery, and leave room for curiosity to do its work. Don’t ask for resumes and don’t give a job application link in the first message. Give people the company name regardless if it’s in stealth or not because it’s something people want to know. If funding is exceptional, mention it. We want to have the best introduction about the company as possible.

If people respond, the next step is to ask for an email to send them more information and schedule the initial phone call. Even though we can find contact information easily, always ask first. Treat people like we would want them to treat us. Among all the spam, the human element and permission-based contact in all our interaction with others are so important. It will set us apart from every bot that just bombards candidates with non-relevant emails, and it sets up the initial call to be a success.

Example message:

My colleagues and I think that you would be a great fit for our role of Principal Software Engineer at XYZ-company, a $15M SEED-funded startup (99% of seed stage startups don’t raise more than $1M) located in Mountain View, CA and founded by very successful serial team of entrepreneurs and gurus in the analytics space. Our CEO was recently featured in Forbes’ 30 under 30: [Link to article without shortening]

$180K + Equity + Mountain View, CA + Principal Software Engineer + Full Benefits + VISA Sponsor

Take care,

Ninh Tran

LinkedIn 2016 Guide to Modern Recruiter v2.0
LinkedIn 2016 Guide to Modern Recruiter v2.0

Finally, remember that the whole process matters. We must have a solid #recruiting strategy and #hiring process. From the moment when we make contact with the initial message to the moment when the candidate gets an offer, through onboarding and beyond, treat the candidate as a person, with honesty and decency. Answer their questions, give constructive feedback, and follow up, and you will create a lasting relationship that goes beyond any one role.

About Author

Ninh Tran, CMO at Hiretual.com blog imageNinh Tran, CMO at Hiretual, a Recruiting Power Tool made by Recruiters for Recruiters

LinkedIn | Twitter | Quora

Hiretual – Your Recruiting Assistant

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This article was originally published here.

 

You Can’t Define a Digital Native by Their Age

Written by Mary Sue Rogers | Originally published at Save HR blog.

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msr_400x400
Mary Sue Rogers, globally recognized leader in HR and Talent Management, owns blog at SaveHR.com

We hear the term digital native on a frequent basis. And the CHRO receives a lot of input on how to make the systems and process of HR fit for a digital native. And the assumption is that a digital native is one that grew up with the Internet, smartphones, Facebook and similar. But is that the definition of a digital native? Or is a digital native more a state of mind and how you reach and use the technology around you? The latter is the theory put forward by Constellation’s researcher Alan Lepofsky – Segmenting Audiences by Digital Proficiency.

As I am not a paid up member of Constellation I can only get the abstract, and then supplemented that with the Bill Kutik’s Firing Line interview with Ray Wang. I am sure the full paper is excellent based on the summary.

So Alan’s premise is that how knowledgeable you are in the use of digital tools and how comfortable you are in using them determines your level of digital proficiency and therefore whether you are a “digital native”.

Like all good consulting models – it starts with a four-box model that is Y axis of Comfort and an X axis of Knowledge. And like all four box models – the top right-hand corner are individuals who have lots of knowledge regarding digital, they are good at it, and they want to use it. The bottom left-hand corner is those that are not good at it and don’t want to use it. You can fill out the others.

And then based on these characteristics, Alan has developed names for the various types of digital users.

Natives – the top right-hand corner.  Know how to use the technology and enjoy using it. Not an age definition but one of knowledge and comfort.
Holdouts – the bottom left-hand corner – those individuals that don’t want to use technology and don’t like doing it. Again I know people at a wide spectrum of ages that meet this definition.
Immigrants – these are individuals that want to be good at it but are not there yet. They are comfortable with the technology and want to learn. My mother-in-law at the age of 80 would fall into this category.
Disengaged – those that are good at it but don’t want to use it. I know many individuals in this group, especially millennials.
Voyeurs – Those that wander between the various quadrants depending on their mood and the subject.

If this segmentation is used instead of the one described digital natives instead of age – then perhaps we can be more focused on what type of employees we do have, and what is the right thing to do for our business around digital, social, learning and culture.

Constellation Research recommends using a combination of a person’s knowledge and comfort level with technology, a characteristic referred to as Digital Proficiency.

Read more in Who Are the Real Five Generations in the Workplace? Bill Kutik‘s article on the subject, posted on Human Resource Executive Online.

Image – Word Cloud created by Marc Prensky.


Source: You Can’t Define a Digital Native by Their Age