Is Video Screening the Next Big Thing in HR Tech?

Is Video Screening the Next Big Thing in HR Tech?

The guest blog post by Optimize.
Video Screening
An image from Dean Drobot’s portfolio on Shutterstock

As many companies know, it’s costly to bring candidates to interview, costly in time, and for the candidates themselves to travel to your location; as a result, all efforts should be made to reduce those costs for all involved. If your recruiters or HR managers have to spend hours on the phone conducting phone screening interviews, or worse, have to chase phone calls and emails, that costs money too. There has to be a better way right?

Video Screening is a relatively new process and has been used to successful effect by several companies. 50% of companies who have implemented it have said it has improved their cost to hire significantly.

Screening process through the ages

Gone are the days of walking in an office door, chatting with the manager, and landing the job. In the past, there wasn’t a great deal of need to “screen” candidates as there weren’t such a high volume of applicants per role. There wasn’t as much social mobility so jobs were much more predetermined, and competitiveness – to a small degree – was decreased. Besides, roles themselves were different, so if someone had an accounting degree and you were hiring an accountant, and their references checked out, you were good to go. It was very likely if you had a degree in a certain subject you’d get a job in that area. Now it’s not so simple.

Presently, the job market is much more open and changes of career are commonplace. With a higher volume of (on paper) qualified applicants with secondary and tertiary skills, it means most graduates can quickly train in a wide range of surface level roles rather than an immediate specialism – and their initial skills are less important than how they can learn, think, and grow with a company.

This now dynamic workforce has increased applications to city centre roles and larger corporations. The modern candidate has a wider range of skills on offer and the ability to apply online at many different companies with ease. To deal with higher volumes, and simply to narrow down the candidate pool, an effective screening process becomes necessary. Companies may have dozens, even hundreds of qualified applicants to a role, so how does each candidate distinguish him- or herself from another?

To keep up with demand, companies implemented processes such as phone screening interviews, email exchanges, and informal face to face chats. But these techniques are limited in their effectiveness to see the ‘real’ person – and they are very time consuming. These past processes – chats, phone calls, and so forth – certainly have the benefit of being personable, but when your company hires in large volumes, it no longer has the time. It’s also impossible for larger businesses (high street retailers, for example) or someone like the Post Office to hire for busy, seasonal work – like at Christmas – where they can typically expect to receive thousands of applications, and need to turn the process around in weeks (if they even have that long). Centralisation of the recruitment process – having a set process, quality control, and set standards predetermined for each role – allows a head office to have visibility in the managing of high-volume applications.

In the past, a warehouse manager might have been the one to hire with vastly differing results, which can cause efficiency and staff turnover problems down the line, whilst also limiting head office’s ability to control the quality of their workforce.

The growing need to screen candidates

Hiring has changed drastically over the years because – in the past – people stayed put. It wasn’t uncommon for people to mark their 20th, 30th, or even 40th anniversary with a company, but as the job market has changed with the need for say more tech jobs than ever, hiring processes have needed to evolve to keep up with demand and time constraints. Today’s worker currently stays in a role for between one and two years. This shorter timeline means your company – through no fault of its own – will inevitably see staff turnover as a part of everyday life, and it will subsequently need to hire more people, more often. Processes, thus, need to keep up.

Video Interview
An image by Optimize

The current landscape of video screening

Video screening is still in its infancy – not in the sense that the technology is primitive, but in that it’s relatively new to the scene and many people might not know about it as an option. Many HR managers and recruitment companies do realise that the way they hire now isn’t efficient enough, but they may not know how to remedy that lack of efficiency.

A Monster study revealed that most recruiters spend over 70,000 minutes on the phone each year. With faster turnovers, does your company really have that time? Think of what you pay your HR manager or recruiter per hour and multiply that number by the number of candidates you usually have to screen for each position. That’s the figure it will cost you only to reach the interview stage, which costs more time and money.

Companies who implement video screening find that it reduces time to discover who they want to bring to interview. They can collaborate as a team on which candidates are most suitable to interview. Candidates are no longer simply reduced to the black and white of their CV paper; they can come alive on screen. Their personalities can shine through, and they can take the time to impress you and your hiring team. It’s like those old days of people walking in your offices for a job, but better – because you can decide in front of them without actually being in front of them (you know, because it’s a video)!

The advantages to screening

Once you’ve combed through CVs and shortlisted you candidates – or narrowed them down through them using software, whichever – then you’ll send them the pre-screening questions. You set the questions, set time limits for the answers, and set a deadline, and send them to your shortlist. Candidates will feel like they’re moving forward in the process from the moment they submit their application, but this step is virtually hands free for your company. Questions can be sent out immediately – or after you’ve verified their CV. Video screening is perfect for high volume, decentralised industries such as seasonal warehouse jobs – but also works especially well for customer facing roles as you’ll quickly determine how a candidate’s personality matches your company’s core values or personal preferences.

If hiring for customer service roles, you’ll want to see how well candidates can handle potentially tricky questions on the spot, and video screening is a perfect opportunity for candidates to showcase their ability to think on their feet. You can ask the applicant a troublesome question like how they’d deal with a customer that would like to return an item without a receipt or how they’d handle logging a complaint about a fellow colleague (who is currently off shift)? Keeping the problems agnostic of your company vertical will test the quick thinking and experience of the application. It’s often more about how the candidate delivers an answer than the answer itself.

The big sell with Video Screening is that you will see candidates before they come in – in animation – not in the social stalk kinda way where you have to check out their LinkedIn or Facebook profile pictures before you phone them! Seeing someone in person and viewing how they hold themselves and interact with the questions you set – even if it’s not physically – can help you gauge their suitability. Some could argue that human bias could sway results based on attractiveness alone, but, again, if you need a front-facing position, and you need someone confident and bubbly you can see that on a video interview, looks aside. Besides, companies will do themselves a disservice only hiring those deemed “attractive,” because – at the end of the day – you want people who are good at what they do and are the most qualified for the job outside of attractiveness level.

That sounds great – but is Video Screening really the future?

As mentioned before, processes are clearly not good enough. Just ask anyone who hires large volumes of staff – it’s tough. Many companies turn to some sort of tech whether it’s computer tests or computerised CV combing, but those processes are imperfect and still fail to show you the ‘real’ person behind the CV. You may have someone who can pass computer tests, or put in keywords in white font on their CV, but they aren’t very good in person; they don’t fit with your office culture, or they aren’t confident enough for a front-of-house role. That’s where video screening helps the process along in an innovative way. Sure, for some roles, you may just need that shy guy or girl who can code really well, and maybe for those applications video screening seems less appropriate, but, either way, if your candidate will be in the office, you need to make sure he or she fits in and works well with others (and has a modicum of confidence).

And, let’s face it, videos are everywhere these days! Video is the fastest way to get people’s attention – that’s why YouTube and those Facebook videos are so popular!

Okay, but what about those people who feel uncomfortable with video screening? Will it put applicants off? Is it too edgy and too new to try out? The truth is it may put some applicants off, sure. It may not appeal to older generations, but most candidates are willing to go through the hiring process no matter what it is. Most people have been to group interviews where you spend time building something out of paper with bits of blue tac and string (or some such exercise that is measuring a metric that has nothing to do with what you can build out of paper with ten strangers). Those people may not love that group activity, but if it’s part of your interview process – and they want the job with your company – they’ll endure the task – not that we’re trying to liken video screening to group interviews. Candidates who apply to large retailers often have to undergo computer testing, and they do that too. The point is that the most motivated candidates will be willing to go through the process of video screening even if it’s a little unusual or different for them. Therefore Video Screening works well as a deterrent to those not wholly invested in the role, again improving the efficiency of your process.

Furthermore, younger candidates will especially love this method because they are far more comfortable using a smartphone, taking a selfie, seeing themselves on screen. Enabling the next generation of skilled workers to apply in a way that suits them is going to put your company one step ahead of the competition in 2017 and beyond. Video screening is here to stay. It’s making processes better, faster, and cost-effective, so it’s best to jump on the video bandwagon before you get left behind.


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Future of Work Trends, Part 2: A Boom in Skilled Professions

Future of Work Trends, Part 2: A Boom in Skilled Professions

Robot Process Automation

If you missed our first part in the series we call the Future of Work Trends, check it out here. We discussed the first trend in Part 1 where we spoke about freelancing which is growing at a rapid rate. Where freelancing is creating multiple job opportunities for people across the U.S., U.K. and other parts of the world who are looking for flexible work options, on the other hand, there is also a rise in demand for skilled professionals from the field of information technology, data science and other skilled trades. As a need for freedom and balance appears in talent, the organisations are learning to cater and adopt the same.

Skilled professional positions will continue to grow rapidly as we know, so first up is IT. As per job site CareerBuilder & labour market data provider Emsi, the jobs in information technology field have grown rapidly since 2012 paying the most at an average of $40.82 an hour. With great advancement in the field of information & technology, the demand for more IT professionals has increased. These demands will have a major impact on the overall job market. People are becoming more and more tech savvy, and are likely to incline towards the technology jobs. Information technology has seen a variety of new job roles with the introduction of new technologies like big data, IoT (Internet of Things), augmented reality, etc. in the last few years. With more technologies and inventions happening in IT every day, more demand for IT jobs is expected in the coming time.

Just like information technology demand for skilled trades people like electricians, A/C technicians, plumbers, etc. have also increased. Sales related jobs are also on the boost with a greater amount of salaries offered. With rapid growth in construction and infrastructure related fields taking place around the globe, a demand for these skilled technicians has been at an all-time high.

Employers are offering various facilities like medical insurance, bonuses and incentives to attract more of the skilled professionals both in permanent and contingent capacity.

Data science is another field which is seeing the tremendous transformation with rapid demand for its professionals like the data scientist, ICU nurses, analysts etc. These professions are turning out to be the hottest jobs of the year. These professionals are earning handsome salaries which have increased faster in the last few years. Apart from the Skilled Professions rising, the market is also seeing a growing trend of a new form of job marketplace which is happening over the social media related skills. In the third part, of the series, we will focus on the jobs demands created through social media networking and growth of the socially connected world.

To read more or follow our series explore our blogs; to speak with us about employer’s hubs and how we can help transform your contractor talent management by bringing efficiencies through our simple cloud platform, get in touch. We are a free platform for project based skilled interims with thousands of jobs refreshed daily, join us today.


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Head of Catering Jobs in NYC

Google for Jobs: Opening the Door for Applicant Experience Chatbots

Google for Jobs: Opening the Door for Applicant Experience Chatbots
Source: TechCrunch

Recently, the Google Cloud Jobs API team unveiled Google for Jobs. By aggregating similar job titles into groups of jobs, job seekers can search and discover relevant jobs in a centralized location, rather than visiting multiple job boards and company career pages. Google says recruiters can expect “more, motivated applicants.”

Google’s entrance to the job search space, brings much needed innovation. In a recent blog post, Google for Jobs: Disrupting the Recruiting Market?, Josh Bersin, details today’s frustrating landscape:

“The bottom line is a lot of headaches and inefficiency in the job market: the average open position receives more than 150 resumes, more than 45% of candidates never hear anything back from the employer, 83% of candidates rate their job search experience poor…”

With Google doing what they do best — organizing information and making it searchable and discoverable, the job search experience will improve. This further catalyzes an already budding, industry-wide movement towards improved candidate engagement.

When coupled with the increasing pervasiveness of “Quick Apply” options, Google’s enhanced job discoverability has officially knocked down all barriers to applying. Recruiters will experience a massive increase in inbound applicants.

As applicant pools grow, recruiters’ needs will shift from, “How do I get applicants to apply to my jobs?” to “How do I engage this new and much larger applicant pool?” The application floodgates have opened and recruiters, already stretched thin, lack the bandwidth to engage.

Here’s where chatbots come in.

Chatbots engage on candidates’ schedules.

Most applicants and recruiters have tight schedules, which makes it hard to find time to connect. With narrow windows of time to communicate, recruiters and applicants often miss each other. Unlike recruiters, chatbots are not limited by time. Rather, they engage with applicants at their convenience.

Chatbots are patient and listen attentively.

In order to move through the ever-growing queue of applicants, recruiters often rush through the most important aspect of their job: building relationships with candidates. Recruiters strive to listen to candidates, to empathize with their situation and to provide thoughtful feedback and context about the job. Unfortunately, buckling under the pressure to quickly engage, screen and assess, recruiters lack the bandwidth to provide such a thoughtful experience. Chatbots, on the other hand, can be patient when recruiters cannot. Chatbots fulfill the outcome recruiters desire, but are too overburdened to achieve themselves.

Chatbots allow recruiters to make data-driven decisions.

Lastly, similar to “Quick Apply” applications, rushed interviews reduce the data available to recruiters. Short, distracted phone screens provide an incomplete picture of a candidate. Not only does this force recruiters to make decisions based on data they know is incomplete, but candidates are left feeling misrepresented. Chatbots patiently listen to applicants in order to gather a complete picture of their experiences and skills as they relate to the role in question — effectively replicating the outcome recruiters seek in the initial phone screen, but with more holistic data.

Candidates deserve a hiring experience that is un-rushed, attentive and personable. Recruiters want this too, but lack the bandwidth to provide such engagement at scale. The introduction of Google for Jobs further compounds this dilemma.

🙋 ️Enter Wendy.

Wendy is an Applicant Experience Chatbot. She automates the experience recruiters wish they could provide for every applicant. She does not seek to replicate the candidate-recruiter relationship itself. Rather, she replicates, at scale, the outcome a conversation between candidate and recruiter achieves. She aims to engage candidates in an attentive, empathetic way that makes them comfortable enough to open up about their professional accomplishments and career goals — just as a recruiter seeks to do.

What other implications do you think Google for Jobs has on the industry? Let us know in the comments or start a conversation with us on Twitter: @wadeandwendy.


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Statistics

Hiring Statistics You Need to Know for 2017 (Infographic)

Statistics

While we are aware that the job landscape is always changing – with new technology, automation and outsourcing removing jobs, and new startups popping up everywhere you look – it’s sometimes hard to see the big picture. But, as a hiring manager or even business leader, it is important to know where the industry is headed. Background check company, EBI, has put together a list of 60 hiring statistics that are important for every HR professional. Looking at everything from the hiring process to gender and diversity breakdown in the workplace, it paints a telling picture of the issues HR professionals face every day.

You can see the highlights in the infographic below:

Hiring Statistics You Need to Know for 2017 | Infographics by EBI


Source: 60 Hiring Statistics You Need to Know for 2017

Google Hiring Space

Google Enters the Hiring Fray

Google Hire | The HR Tech Weekly®

It looks like Google was serious about entering the jobs space.

The Google Hire website appeared this month, and while it hasn’t been officially announced, the world’s largest data aggregator could be gearing up to launch an application tracking website which could rival LinkedIn, Greenhouse and Jobvite.

While this new website seems to be still in early stages of development, you can’t help but wonder: how is this new technology going to affect the jobs and recruiting space?

It makes perfect sense that both Facebook and Google would actively seek to gain control of a larger chunk of the jobs market. These platforms are already a definitive part of many people’s daily lives, so it is not surprising that they want to play an increasingly important role in the job search process. As we know, there are enormous possibilities where there are lots of people, and Facebook and Google have their markets comfortably cornered. Why go elsewhere when you’re looking for your next position?

So: how are they going about it?

Google, with the relatively recent introduction of their Cloud Jobs API, looks set to make a big impact, as their latest algorithms and intelligent data interpretation solutions set out to bridge the gaps between employers and job seekers in an unprecedented way: carefully matching the skills, experience and personal preferences of job seekers with the title, position, description and expectations of employees advertising specific job opportunities.

The Cloud Jobs API also has the ability to define the importance and level of various skills, as well as put such skills into the right context, in relation to any particular job requirement or opening available.

This happens through the use of various proprietary ontologies, which are meant to encode insights and information about different skills and occupations, as well shedding light on how such skills interact and correlate with each other. In short? Google will gather and assess your jobs data and match you with appropriate openings. Conversely, recruiters could potentially find perfect matches with pinpoint accuracy.

Interestingly, Google Hire openings have been listed on the bebop website, the VMware enterprise application development platform Google acquired in 2015. VMware’s cofounder, Diane Green was appointed to lead Google’s cloud push efforts that same year.

For Friendships Or Job Searches?

When I look at my Facebook feed, I’ll often see my friends using their status update to ask their network for job openings.  Now, Facebook has confirmed it had begun experimenting with recruiting features: “We’re running a test for Page admins to create job postings and receive applications from candidates.” The company is also actively investing more in functionality for recruiters and employers, giving them the ability to share job opportunities that are specifically visible to an audience that matches their standards (for example, the level of education required).

From a recruiter’s standpoint, Facebook is a goldmine, because it is such a huge repository of information about people. Individuals share a wide variety of data about themselves on their social media, from their basic information to their education level, their current employment, and their personal interests. If you want to gain an exhaustive profile of a candidate, you can’t do much better than Facebook.

As Facebook is already a definitive part of our daily lives, it’s not surprising that it could play an important role in the job searching industry. But do they run the same risks as platforms such as LinkedIn, where personal information becomes more curated to attract a certain job? Will people be pumping up their own profiles, not always accurately? The beauty of Facebook’s “raw and real” data may be quickly lost once people know recruiters are able to mine their information.

As both Facebook and Google enter the space, it confirms yet again that the rate of developments in our space is blinding, and that the new year might bring a few more tricks to learn yet.

About the Author:

Megan Flamer

Megan Flamer is an organizational development specialist who is fascinated by how people find and interact with their work and each other. She writes about recruitment, HR, human behaviour, and the future of work at 1-Page.com

1-Page on Social Media:

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Increase Your Response Rate to Job Candidates

Be Relevant

The days of sending generic recruiting emails (We’re Hiring!) to potential candidates, hoping that someone actually responds, are coming to an end… and it cannot come soon enough.

Candidates, especially the best ones, are increasingly exhausted and frustrated by the deluge of generic emails they get from recruiters. Generic emails go where they should – in the trash, with the sender either blocked or relegated to SPAM limbo.

It does not need to be this way though. Today is the day you get relevant, right up front, and with relevancy comes response.

Consider: In our research at Paysa, as well as our years of hiring thousands of people across many companies, we have found that people take jobs based on five factors:

  1. Salary: Will I make a competitive salary?
  2. Team: Will I be working with people that I can learn from, that I can respect and trust, and reversely, will I have the ability to contribute and teach?
  3. Impact: Will my skills and experience be leveraged in a way to make an impact?
  4. Future growth: Will this position help me grow my career?
  5. Company: Am I excited about the prospects of the hiring company?

If you want to drastically increase your response rates with candidates as well as your hiring success rate, anchor your communication in these areas from the outset.

Too many recruiters and/or hiring managers hide much of this information until the end (often bitter) which can result in no response, or even worse, a disconnect in the position match.

Relevancy = Response. Start early.

In our experience, the perfect job candidate email contains a mix of the following information:

Money: What can the candidate expect to make? By creating a ‘fake’ profile (skills, experience, education) for your candidate on Paysa, you can determine what they are making at their current company. Using this information, you can better position the salary of the new job: “Opportunity to make more than you are making today”…

Skills: Highlight the candidate’s core skills and experiences that make them a such a good match. Give the candidate a sense for how those skills and experiences are needed by the hiring company, and subsequently their ability to make an impact. What new skills will they be acquiring and what is the market value of those skills?

People: Let the candidate know the background of people they will be working with at the company. How good is the team? Paysa’s CompanyRank is a great tool for this – it measures and tracks the density of technical talent of companies over time.

Company: Tell the candidate what is special about the hiring company – it could be size of the company, customer or data access, market opportunity, the people, etc.

While it takes more time to create targeted emails, the results will be worth it. Happy hunting!

About the Author

Chris Bolte, CEO & Co-Founder at Paysa

Chris Bolte, CEO and Co-Founder of Paysa.

Chris is passionate about helping employees maximize their value across the arc of their career.

LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook


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5 Reasons Why Big Data Analytics Degrees Are Worth It

Careers in Big Data

Due in large part to the rapid growth of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, big data analytics is approaching new heights. Students who pursue a degree in big data analytics learn how to effectively analyze large sets of data and identify patterns, connections and other pertinent details revealed by data. Companies are increasingly turning to data analytics to harness customer insights, and ultimately, produce better business decisions. As a result, big data analysts are in high demand and the data analytics field is showing no signs of slowing down. Here are five reasons why earning a degree in big data analytics pays off.

The Thriving Field

More and more universities are offering degrees in big data analytics to adjust to the growing job demand and close the skills gap, or in other words, produce more employable talent who can glean useful insights from big data. With massive amounts of data being produced daily, it’s no wonder why data analysts are in such high demand. Large corporations, such as Microsoft and IBM, analyze and leverage data in order to extract more information about clients. IBM, for example, divides clients by certain commonalities—such as industry, company size and revenue—to better segment prospects and create highly effective marketing campaigns.

A Generous Earning Potential

A career in big data is a lucrative career choice, with the national average salary for data-related careers hovering in the mid-90s (PayScale). Additionally, scientific and technical services, information technologies, retail, sustainability and professional services are often the leading industries in terms of having the most job openings in big data analytics.

Highly Rewarding for Business and Employees

Big data analysts typically wear several hats within an organization, but they focus on one key principle: to help companies make better business decisions by revealing useful insights from data. As a result, this is a highly esteemed position for any business professional, and one that is commonly cited as being both rewarding and satisfying.

Real-World Training and Preparation

Improvements in programming technology and graph databases, such as Neo4j, are continuing to transform the data analytics field and how data can be used. Companies around the world are recognizing more and more benefits of data analysis, and rely heavily on big data analysts to execute the job. As a result, many of the nation’s top engineering colleges are putting more emphasis on real-world experience inside the classroom, by supplementing classwork with hands-on training and lab work.

Join an Elite Pool of Talent

In order to succeed in a big data analytics career, it’s essential to have a deep understanding of science and mathematics—but that’s not all. The field also incorporates advanced knowledge of decision analysis and data mining, and it requires critical thinking and problem-solving to truly understand the information at hand. With this in mind, students can expect to work alongside some of the brightest and most talented peers. By collaborating with these individuals, students can gain a new perspective and understanding of complex topics.

For students looking for a career with a promising future, earning a degree in big data analytics is certainly a great option; big data analytics is a field with unlimited potential for growth and discovery.

About the Author

Lauren WillisonAs the Director of Admissions at Florida Polytechnic University, Lauren Willison is responsible for supporting the Vice Provost of Enrollment in managing recruitment efforts. She develops and coordinates on- and off-campus events, as well as manages the campus visit experience.


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Recruiting Can Be a Messy Process, But It Doesn’t Have to Be

hr article image

Recruiting can be a messy process, both on the candidate side as well as on the employer side, filled with lots of wasted time, misconceptions, misalignment, and general frustration. Fear not though, it doesn’t have to be so hard, not anymore.

How often does a hiring manager scope out a position that she wants to hire, including the most desired skills & experience and then, when the recruiter comes back with the suggested salary for that role, the hiring manager and/or the CFO freaks out… saying that the salary is a) outside of the budgeted salary and b) is not realistic with the market. The recruiter is then tasked with compiling competitive salary info and possibly even start interviewing candidates only to have the hiring process go sideways when comp is discussed.

Chris Bolte
Chris Bolte, CEO & Co-Founder at Paysa

With an application like Paysa, a hiring manager and/or recruiter can immediately see what the market salary would be for their desired candidate. Further, they can adjust the requirements (remove non-critical skills, change title, revise education requirements) as well as adjust what companies they want to extract candidates from – and see how the salary changes.

Buying a car is similar process: If you are anything like me, you start with the fully loaded version of the car… I want the sport version, premium sound, leather dashboard, automatic seats, special paint job, etc. Sounds good doesn’t it? How much is it? Yowza! Sticker shock! – No way I can afford that! Ok, lets get real… get rid of the sport version, special paint job, leather dashboard, but keep the premium sound… now what does it cost?

Now you can do the same thing with people.

Go to Paysa and create a fake profile for your perfect candidate. List all the skills you want that person to have, the title, experience, education and degree – including their school, as well as the company you want to pull from. Here is an example of an employee at Google – they graduated from Stanford with a PhD in Computer Science, have 10 years work experience, have been at Google since 2010, and are currently a Software Engineer Level 3. This person is estimated to make $285K per year.

Paysa HR Article Image

Too high for your budget? Adjust the profile – I changed the school from Stanford to UCLA, moved the PhD in Computer Science to a Master’s degree, moved them from Google to Yahoo, and cut back their experience from 10 years to 6. New cost: $216K annual – a savings of $69K, almost 25%. That may be more in-line with your budget.

Now, the recruiter and hiring manager have a realistic set of requirements for their candidate, as well as what that candidate is going to cost the hiring company. From here, the recruiter can more easily identify those candidates that fit the profile as well as their expected salary.

Recruiting can be a messy process, but it doesn’t have to be figuring out the right salary for a position.

Next up, how Paysa can help recruiters and companies increase their ‘open rate’ among target candidates…

About Author

As CEO and Co-Founder of Paysa.com, Chris is passionate about helping employees maximize their value across the arc of their career.

Find Chris Bolte on LinkedIn.


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The Pre-Employment Process Shouldn’t be an Afterthought

ES-Onboarding

Rob_Sable
Rob Sable, Founder of EmployStream

Believe it or not, employees aren’t desperate to work for you. We’re in the midst of a candidate-driven market – one where employers must find ways to move smoothly and quickly through the hiring process.

Even though most companies still believe they hold the power in the hiring process, the 2015 Recruiter Sentiment Study from MRINetwork found that 9 in 10 recruiters feel today’s professional market is candidate-driven.

That’s a big misalignment and an even bigger missed opportunity.

The majority of companies don’t believe they need to make changes to reflect candidate choice, so they continue miss out on the best talent. However, those companies who understand and act on the candidate-driven market will thrive even though they’re not in the driver’s seat of the hiring process.

How did we get here?

During the recession, the best candidates were willing to take lower salaries to keep themselves employed. Companies learned that they could get by paying top-performers low wages. Now that the market has flipped and the economy has improved, employees are looking for better opportunities to improve their earning capacities.

At the same time, today’s employees have limitless online resources, such as Glassdoor and CareerBuilder, where they can instantly see wage data and know what salaries they should be targeting. They also have access to millions of career boards and can search for jobs anywhere.

And even if your company is willing to pay for top talent, your hiring process is probably way too long. On average, it takes almost a month for a company to find a candidate and make an offer – plenty of time for your top choice to apply for another job, complete an interview, and potentially receive and accept an offer.

What can be done?

Once you’ve come to accept that employees, not organizations, are in control of the modern hiring process, it’s easier to see what needs improvement.

Aside from offering more competitive wages, employers must find ways to engage talent quickly and efficiently. Simply put: the pre-employment process shouldn’t be an afterthought.

Here are a few tips we’ve found to give potential employees more of what they want and help employers thrive in a candidate-driven market:

  1. Find a mobile job board. Your candidates are on the go. With a mobile job board, you can reach them wherever they are. Research shows more than 3 in 4 job seekers want to apply via mobile.
  2. Try paperless applications and employment docs. There’s no need to have your candidates fill out cumbersome documents. They’re a waste of time, and potentially even direct candidates away from your company. Research has shown that 80% of job applicants would abandon an application that they feel is too time consuming. With a good online application system, your candidates should be able to pull data from their LinkedIn profile or resume to submit a paperless application. Similarly, when it’s time to fill out employment docs, there are services that can auto-fill data and breeze through stacks of paperwork with single-click signatures making for easier (and more accurate) pre-employment paperwork that your candidates won’t dread.
  3. Implement an employee portal. From music and movie streaming to online banking and shopping, today’s candidates are used to on-demand everything. Implementing an employee portal will make things easier on everyone. For one, the portal will give them a place to access paystubs and W2s. But it can also provide a way for them to update banking and tax info, which is one less thing for your company to manage.
  4. Find ways to streamline your process. Outside of things you can implement for your candidates, look at your process and identify ways you can streamline your process to provide a more efficient hiring experience. There is pre-employment software available that can provide real-time alerts and reminders to keep the hiring process moving along. Software can also help you bridge the gaps between your HR systems to eliminate mind-numbing data entry.

When it comes to hiring, the stakes are high and the business is fast-paced. For those companies who are willing to prioritize candidate experience and place value on the pre-employment process, the investment will pay off. But if you can’t keep up with demand and deliver a quality experience, your business will miss out on the best candidates and suffer as a result.


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