Why HR Must Take Ownership Of Data To Survive

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The jobs market remains buoyant, emphasising the need to increase efficiency in hiring processes and improve retention levels but without taking responsibility for its data, achieving these goals will remain elusive and threaten HR’s survival.

The Recruitment and Employment Confederation’s (REC) Report on Jobs last month revealed that permanent placements rose at their highest rate in over two years in July while the availability of temporary and permanent candidates dropped again. An increase was also reported in salaries for all new hires.  

This news comes as the CIPD reports that analytics and AI were named as two of the top three most disruptive issues facing HR during a panel debate at the University of Bath. The contingent workforce was the third. ‘Ownership of data’ was highlighted as a specific issue as the nature of the jobs market and the working environment are both relentlessly disrupted by technology. CIPD Chief Executive Peter Cheese also observed a ‘complacency’ surrounding technology.

Taking ownership of data

Without taking ownership of data it is impossible to understand what is happening in your hiring process or improve falling retention levels among new hires. This is a particular problem in the UK as nearly half of all employers are failing to address the impact automation and AI will have on their business.

In order to avoid a complacent attitude towards recruitment data, adopt the following three steps:

Align your recruitment planning with business objectives: Talent acquisition strategies should be aligned with the overall objectives of the business but nearly a third of hiring teams don’t have a strategic workforce plan according to a Korn Ferry report. Collaboration is essential to implement effective talent planning and must be supported by technology.

Use applicant tracking software: The first step towards effective use of data is the implementation of a modern recruitment management system yet nearly half of employers don’t use applicant tracking software in their recruitment strategy. Without it, gaining an accurate understanding of what is preventing your business from hiring talent is impossible. Vital recruitment metrics enable HR to evaluate and improve hiring success yet too many hiring teams lack this vital knowledge.  Evidence based decision making is critical to creating a talent acquisition strategy that works.

Acknowledge the mobile job search: Only just over a quarter (28%) of companies use mobile technology in recruitment yet the rise of mobile job search is one of the most prominent tech trends affecting talent acquisition. By integrating a mobile responsive hiring process your ability to hold on to the qualified candidates in your recruitment funnel will improve – it is a straightforward step available through your recruitment software.

Improving the effectiveness of HR

Additional issues complicate HR’s ability to take ownership of its data.  The effectiveness – or otherwise – of HR functions also affect this area. 

A new survey from ViewsHub found that HR departments in technology companies were rated as the least effective and notably below the industry average. Professional service companies and retail also recorded low rankings which were based on three key criteria, namely, the ability to get things done, their technical ability in their jobs and their responsiveness to other teams. HR functions in the travel and food sectors ranked highest in the survey. 

Again, a move towards data driven recruitment can improve the perception of HR across an organisation:

Become more agile: An article in the Harvard Business Review, suggests that a lack of agility is holding back HR’s ability to adapt to disruptions. It proposes that HR should operate in ways that respond to ongoing changes in culture and working style – which includes developing a tech-centric culture. This is evident in tired recruitment processes that bear no resemblance to the job search habits of today’s candidates and are based on assumptions that the labour market still favours employers. An agile HR function increases efficiency in hiring and ultimately productivity. Relinquishing your reliance on manual recruitment processes will enable that and improve the ‘effectiveness ranking’ of HR departments which are struggling to respond to the needs of their business. 

Use data to understand the jobs that make a difference: McKinsey suggests that 5% of jobs create 95% of the impact within an organisation. Those exact jobs are different for every company. HR analytics will help your business to identify your roles which fall into the 5% category and focus on sourcing the talent for those positions  – and improve the effectiveness of HR. Taking ownership of data and avoiding complacency around technology is key to this. 

Take ownership of your data. Invest in world class recruitment software used by some of the world’s leading organisations to manage their entire talent recruitment systems. Contact Advorto today.

This article first appeared on Advorto's blog.

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Etiquette

Professional Etiquette For Jobseekers And Recruiters (Infographic)

Professional Etiquette for Jobseekers and Recruiters | Main Image

To be on your best behavior is always important, but good professional etiquette is more essential and more critical when one is looking for a job or a new talent for a company.

For job seekers, failing to create a positive and lasting impression during the initial assessment can hinder their chances of moving forward in the hiring process.

For recruiters, even the slightest mistake during the hiring process could cause them to potentially lose a valuable candidate.

Keeping up to date with the overwhelming amount of job search trends, hiring protocols and interview practices can be very stressful. Also, these trends may quickly change. In this infographic, we listed down the rules that will forever matter.  Rules that job seekers and recruiters have to keep in mind during the whole hiring process.

So, good professional etiquette is important during hiring process. Learn some rules that jobseekers and recruiters have to keep in mind with this infographic by Phil. Exeq Search Solutions.

Professional Etiquette for Jobseekers and Recruiters | Infographic by Phil. Exeq Search Solutions


Source: Professional Etiquette For Jobseekers And Recruiters (Infographic)

Why Waste Time When It Comes to Hiring?

Why Waste Time When It Comes to Hiring?

Recruitment Tray

2016 was pretty big when it came to politics, technology and of course; celebrity deaths. So it’s quite easy to see how you may have gotten distracted with what was happening in recruitment – you’re only human.

Now that we’re half way into 2017, it’s clear to see what technology trends are shaping the way the recruitment landscape is advancing. Technology is becoming an important part of our everyday lives and it’s use in how we work should be no different.

Where do you start?

At a first glance, the amount of resource out there may seem intimidating (and at times, gratuitous). Continuous innovation is great, but can feel overwhelming when in a company that still relies on traditional methods.

Which is why i’ve put together five trends which are not just popular, but also actionable. Hopefully helping you to cut through the endless supposition out there, and provide you with ideas you can get started with today. And in a role where onboarding new staff is a time-consuming (and sometimes, dated) process, it’s important that you up-skill to avoid inefficiencies creeping into your daily routine.

5 technology trends for recruitment

  1. Embrace social profiles as applications
    Ease of application needs to be paramount as we continue to move into 2017. Your potential candidates live on social. Aberdeen Group have found that 73% of 18-34 year olds have found their most recent job through social media[1]. It’s where they will look for your roles and it’s the easiest way to interact with them. By making it so your applicants can auto-fill their information from their LinkedIn or Facebook profile to your applications, you’re streamlining a process that can usually be seen as repetitive and time consuming. The easier you make it for them, the more likely they are to complete the application. This also gives you insight into their personal profiles, keeping your system’s information up to date.
  2. Mobile recruiters
    Year on year mobile use has been growing[2], which means the majority of your applicants will be using a mobile device to search for your roles. and having a mobile optimised site won’t be enough to support your potential candidates preferred ways of applying. As applicants will need to upload files, like their CV’s, covering letters or forms of ID to register their interest, the mobile experience needs to ensure it’s catering to this. Linking properly with sites such as Google Drive or Dropbox will keep the process short and smooth and the amount of required questions to a minimum will mean applicant’s return to your site in the future.
  3. Video recruitment
    The rise in use of video in business has steadily grew over the course of 2016 and has continued to increase even more in 2017. Utilising video interviews will benefit recruiters hugely concerned with reducing the amount of time spent interviewing candidates in the early stages of high-volume recruitment campaigns. As video interviews can be conducted remotely, recruiters can much easier cater to applicants schedules, and therefore allocate time easier, whilst still being able to identify high calibre candidates. And by reducing time spent finding suitable candidates, recruiters can focus more on developing suitable candidates for clients.
  4. Inbound recruitment marketing
    Recruitment tactics will need to start reflecting marketing tactics in order to attract the top talent as we move into the second half of 2017. And as the marketing sector has started to adopt; inbound tactics are proving to be more effective than previous outbound tactics. This should be done through content strategies that draw candidates to your company with pieces that reflect their interests and that they can identify with. Keep them easily accessible by sharing on platforms like social media.
  5. Updated internal processes
    Spending time hunting through piles of CV’s or application forms slows down response time in an age when most answers are a click away, and more importantly; expected to be a click away. Eliminating paper not only updates your methods and reduces the amount of paper your company consumes. It also reduces the time and money spent managing admin whilst protecting document from going missing, ensures your information is easily searchable and kept backed up in a centralised location. This can be achieved by adopting solutions such as electronic signatures for signing off documents, CRM systems specific to recruiters needs or social media management tools.

Initiate, improve and innovate!

So, try them out! By modernising your approach to hiring staff, you’re not only ensuring that your company isn’t wasting time, but you’re directly improving employee productivity and engagement whilst creating a better talent strategy, which inevitably helps your current and future team members.

About the Author:

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Jessie Davies is a Marketing Manager at Signable and also goes by the title “Content Queen”. Signable is an electronic signature platform that helps businesses get their documents finalised faster. As Content Queen she ensures that Signable’s customer’s resource for support, educational content and industry updates are always available and clear. Jessie also makes sure the Twitter feed is full of hilarious reaction gifs and sarcastic comments.

Website | Twitter | Facebook

References:

[1] Source - Millennial Job Search from Aberdeen Group: Getting Social Media Recruitment Right

[2] Source - Mobile Use Statistics, Smart Insights: Mobile Marketing Statistics Compilation

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Recruitment Tools: The Magic Lamp for HR

Recruitment Tools: The Magic Lamp for HR

Written by Sachin Gupta, CEO and Co-Founder, HackerEarth.

Sachin Gupta, CEO and Co-Founder, HackerEarth

Ask any business right now about their top challenges — chances are good that recruiting and retaining talent will be on the top three in the priority list. Smart organizations are aware that they’re only as good as their employees and will prioritize in hiring the best of the best for their organizations.

As technology continues to evolve, it is playing a significant role in the way companies approach the talent search and the hiring process. With companies not really carrying labels that say they are tech or non-tech anymore, finding and retaining great tech talent is what the hiring game is now all about.

According to a recent 2017 survey, finding and hiring top tech talent is what keeps the executives up at night. It has been the management’s greatest concern for the last five years. However, with recruiters latching on to online recruitment tools that are “smartifying” the hiring process, tech hiring was never easier, and never more reliable.

Time for a change

When LinkedIn and other online job applications first began to gain traction, they were considered as supplements to the traditional paper résumé and in-person interview. Today, the world of recruiting has gone nearly 100-percent digital. Traditional recruiting processes often fail to acquire the best and brightest. With smart online assessment tools, recruiters are no longer limited to interviewing candidates within a limited geographical radius, and they are less likely to make bad hires based just on snazzy résumés. They don’t need to put in hours sifting through résumés that are often not a reflection the saleable skills or manually evaluating tests. There is no place for unconscious bias either.

Online recruitment tools are replacing traditional methods that don’t always work. Entrepreneurs are ready to invest big in amazing technical assessment tools that automate complex screening and recruiting tasks to add real value.

Using traditional hiring methods are deal-breakers especially for companies looking at acquiring quality technical talent. There is no one-size-fits-all approach. Different requirements warrant different tools or processes. Be it a campus recruitment drive or hiring for niche profiles, online technical assessment tools have an answer. So, what is the reason for these tools to be highly successful?

Scale

A leading retailer wanted to scale its hiring process across Indian cities. When its current hiring process did not support the rapid expansion, the global e-com leader opted for online technical assessment tool. It allowed them to have multiple administrators and enabled them to conduct multiple recruitment drives from several cities for various roles and functions. The tool allowed them to assess thousands of candidates remotely and the proctoring mechanisms ensured a fair assessment. In a span of six months, the company conducted 200+ hiring drives and assessed over 27,000 candidates in different cities.

Time

Minimizes manual filtering of hundreds of résumés thus saving time. Significantly reduces the number of interviews your technical team needs to take to find the right candidate. Prevents the number of candidates from becoming a bottleneck because any number of candidates can be tested simultaneously. This meant hiring managers and technical managers spending less time assessing candidates and wasting no time on irrelevant candidates.

Efficient campus hiring

Large enterprises usually hire developers in big numbers. Campus hiring is one of the many modes that these organizations use. Using an online recruiting tool, these companies can accurately measure the technical skills of candidates. Online tools will also help these companies to hire from different campuses across states thus achieving the numbers they want to.

Exhaustive Question Library

Some of the best tools nowadays supports multiple question types including programming, MCQ, subjective, android, and front-end programming. These libraries help companies to save time on problem setting and test candidates on assorted topics.

Proctoring measures

Recruiting tools come with the best proctoring measures which helps the recruiters test candidates remotely. These tools have built-in features like plagiarism detector, candidate snapshot, restricting multiple logins among others.

The conclusion

Hiring quality tech talent is the common denominator across all organizations. And the online recruiting tools are significantly better at finding them quality talent than the traditional processes that have been followed till now.

By using a tool such as the automated assessment platforms, even non-tech recruiters can conduct technical screening without a hitch. These coding platforms are significantly better than the processes that already exist in these companies. As these tools are easily integrable with the recruiting workflow of an organization, software giants should be happy to take this route.

To rephrase the famous saying from the movie Ratatouille, “Not everyone can become a great developer; but a great developer can come from anywhere” Make sure you don’t lose out on them.


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Millennials Would be Wise to Embrace Work Limbo

Millennials Would be Wise to Embrace Work Limbo

Job transitions are going to become more and more prevalent as work evolves over the next several decades. Millennials should plan on embracing work limbo.

College to Job Transition: A Personal Story

College to Jobs can be Bumpy

Moving from College to the “Real World” can be Bumpy Ride

After graduating last May, I thought I had my entire future planned. It seemed so easy. Of course it took a lot of work and planning to get all of these things to happen, but I did it and I thought, “Well… I did it! This will be my life for the next two years or so”. I got an awesome full-time paid internship to come home to in Seattle. Then I put in a deposit for my first apartment. Life seemed all set-up and great!

However, soon I would be introduced to the real world; the reality of being a millennial, a young professional in an ever growing city. I would live the reality of the ebb and flow of work limbo that is prevalent today.

If you are a Millennial like me, I have one thing to say to you: get used to job transitions! Get used to feeling like you’re on a roller coaster for the next few years of your professional career! Further, get used to feeling a little out of control and in a state of ‘limbo’ during your adulthood in general.

It’s Going to be Okay

You will survive. I have gone through two job transitions in the past 7 months, three jobs if you count the internship I had right after graduation. When I left my first job, it was difficult not to be hard on myself. It really took a toll on my self esteem. But the thing that kept me going and made me persist was the knowledge that a job that would be better fit was in my future. My reason to leave the last job wasn’t because of my inability to adapt or work hard, it was just that the job didn’t align with my goals/aspirations. It was because the company wasn’t a good fit for me. Plain and simple. The tech industry wasn’t for me. I wasn’t passionate about it, and the company I worked for consisted of a tight knit group of senior recruiters who didn’t know how to train new grads. It just didn’t work out – and that is OKAY.

It’s hard not to feel discouraged and question your place in your profession when it seems like every place you go, something never works out. I’m not going to tell you that it’s been easy transitioning and I’m not going to lie when I say that I’ve doubted myself; but what I will tell you is that I have done self-reflection that has changed my life for the better. Also, the past 7 months have given me a great idea of what I do and don’t want in my next work environment. If you are transitioning… I promise it will be okay. More importantly, surround yourself with supportive individuals who will nourish and heal you throughout your transitions and self-examination. This will help you remain positive and keep you on your feet.

Be Yourself. Be Genuine

Be Genuine. Be Yourself

So important to stay genuine even when going through career limbo

Don’t lose who you are in transitions. My life is not as black and white as I thought it would be after graduation. My mindset was 50 years behind. Back in May, I planned my life to work like: get a job offer before graduation, get an apartment set up before graduation, stay at the job and get promotions for a few years. I’m sure a lot of people will chuckle at this naive mindset, trust me, now I do too. Of course, we all probably planned out a Utopian way of life such as this. You thought, “Hey, I’m a hard-working and creative individual. I’m willing to learn, and have valuable ideas! Who wouldn’t want to work with me?”

I can tell you right now that while all of those things might be true about you, everyone else thinks the same thing. Here’s the reality of this situation and here’s the real question: how will you stand out in a sea of millennials who see themselves in the same light as you do? If you are transitioning from one job to another, or if you are a millennial who just got laid off, or left a job that wasn’t a good fit for you, one thing you are going to discover (through your transitions) is what truly makes you a valuable asset to any company. Most of the time, it’s finding that drive and passion within yourself and making it show in every interview and communication you’re having with a potential employer.

I’m a firm believer that if you can’t find that passion and feeling of drive in the industry you are pursuing, do some soul-searching and figure it out. Once you feel like you have a purpose and once you really show how genuine you are, people are going to notice.

Don’t Get Into the Comparison Game

Don’t compare yourself to everybody else around you. This was the hardest challenge for me to overcome (lets face it, we never truly overcome this, it’s natural to compare yourself to others). This happened because it seemed like everyone around me had their “stuff” together. It was really hard when I was transitioning between jobs not to compare myself to other people. A common thing I found myself thinking was “you aren’t good at what you want to do if these other 20-somethings have been at their job for as long as they have”. What picked me back up from these negative thoughts was what I covered in rule 1: surrounding myself with positive people! It’s hard picking yourself up from self-doubt. In a way, it’s easier (and maybe a little comforting) to be a little self-destructive in a time of uncertainty… we’ve all felt this. However, once we self-destruct with negativity it’s important to continue working toward your goals and find what personally motivates you. What feels better than feeling proud of yourself and having confidence in your abilities and in yourself?

Take-Away

Millennials, I can’t say it enough: Get used to being more comfortable with work limbo! It’s painful, it’s discouraging at times, but we grow stronger with each transition. As a result we solidify in our abilities and increase confidence that we will get through the bumpy times professionally. Please reach out to me via Twitter if you ever need a hint of motivation or advice. If you want to hear more stories, I’ve got plenty, let me know.

About the Author:

SeanKelly Anderson is a Healthcare Recruiter for NuWest Group in Bellevue, WA. SeanKelly graduated from Manhattanville College in New York with a bachelor’s degree in Public Relations, Advertising, and Applied Communication. She also has interned for a couple of companies including Recruiting Bandwidth and Velocity Search Partners. Writes for Crelate Recruiting Blog.


Source: Millennials Would be Wise to Embrace Work Limbo – Crelate

How Conversation Bridges the Gap Between Job Description and Job Seeker

How Conversation Bridges the Gap Between Job Description and Job Seeker

Written by Bailey Newlan, Content & Growth Marketer at Wade & Wendy.

From Ambiguity to Clarity, Through Conversation

Resumes, social profiles and job boards are two-dimensional tools used to present four-dimensional individuals. Each is incapable of communicating your whole story. You are more than a string of keywords and you are more than the templated “Experience” section on LinkedIn.

When people are boxed into these two-dimensional frames, valuable context is lost, leading to a series of frustrating interactions between job seeker and hiring manager. On average, it takes 52 days to fill an open position — a drawn out process wrought with miscommunication and missed opportunities.

How do you communicate the abstract in one bullet or less?

For any given bullet point on a resume, there are a hundred ways to say it. For example:

  • Used Java to build features for a platform
  • Supported a platform with Java
  • Chose Java to build a platform on

Each effectively showcases experience with Java. But, what is a job seeker’s relationship to Java and how does that exhibit what they can really do? Yes, the Java requirement is met, but what kind of person is best-suited for the role? The keyword “Java” falls short of showing how a job applicant and the job itself fit together. This form of static representation is fundamentally limited due to the job seeker’s inability to provide context around their skills, passions, motivations and career goals.

How can you land your dream job when using vague language to apply to an equally vague job description?

Job descriptions are two-dimensional and fall short of providing job seekers clarity around a position. To cast a wide net, job descriptions are often written with vague requirements — carefully crafted with generic keywords, so as not to discourage anyone from applying. Naturally, this results in unclear expectations. Another issue arises when goals and needs shift, yet the job description remains the same. Unfortunately, this kind of moving target is all too common.

This widening chasm between what a job description says and what hiring managers are really looking for in an applicant causes job seekers to create vague resumes and profiles to ensure they will not be overlooked.

By summing oneself up in a string of bullet points, laden with just the right keywords, context is lost and true understanding is clouded. Having to position yourself to meet a set of vague requirements, neutralizes the magic of you.

What can we do about this?

On both sides of the hiring process, there are fundamental flaws. Only by bridging the information gap that presently exists between hiring managers and job seekers, can we:

  1. Facilitate better understanding of a job outside of its description
  2. Better understand a job seeker outside of his or her resume

This is best achieved through conversation. Flowing dialogue and follow-up questions are effective mechanisms for drilling down and extracting the “Why” and the “Who are you really?” Going past the resume and job description allows both job seekers and hiring managers to make better decisions. We must go beyond the two-dimensional modes of expression. We must find clarity. We need better conversations.

About the Author:

Bailey Newlan, Content & Growth Marketer at Wade & Wendy

Bailey Newlan is the Content & Growth Marketer at Wade & Wendy, a New York City-based startup on a mission to make hiring more human. Wade & Wendy’s artificially intelligent chatbot personalities bring clarity and simplicity to the hiring process. Wade is an always-on career guide for job seekers, while Wendy assists hiring managers throughout the recruitment process. To connect, reach out to Bailey via LinkedIn, Twitter or Medium.


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Google Hiring Space

Google Enters the Hiring Fray

Google Hire | The HR Tech Weekly®

It looks like Google was serious about entering the jobs space.

The Google Hire website appeared this month, and while it hasn’t been officially announced, the world’s largest data aggregator could be gearing up to launch an application tracking website which could rival LinkedIn, Greenhouse and Jobvite.

While this new website seems to be still in early stages of development, you can’t help but wonder: how is this new technology going to affect the jobs and recruiting space?

It makes perfect sense that both Facebook and Google would actively seek to gain control of a larger chunk of the jobs market. These platforms are already a definitive part of many people’s daily lives, so it is not surprising that they want to play an increasingly important role in the job search process. As we know, there are enormous possibilities where there are lots of people, and Facebook and Google have their markets comfortably cornered. Why go elsewhere when you’re looking for your next position?

So: how are they going about it?

Google, with the relatively recent introduction of their Cloud Jobs API, looks set to make a big impact, as their latest algorithms and intelligent data interpretation solutions set out to bridge the gaps between employers and job seekers in an unprecedented way: carefully matching the skills, experience and personal preferences of job seekers with the title, position, description and expectations of employees advertising specific job opportunities.

The Cloud Jobs API also has the ability to define the importance and level of various skills, as well as put such skills into the right context, in relation to any particular job requirement or opening available.

This happens through the use of various proprietary ontologies, which are meant to encode insights and information about different skills and occupations, as well shedding light on how such skills interact and correlate with each other. In short? Google will gather and assess your jobs data and match you with appropriate openings. Conversely, recruiters could potentially find perfect matches with pinpoint accuracy.

Interestingly, Google Hire openings have been listed on the bebop website, the VMware enterprise application development platform Google acquired in 2015. VMware’s cofounder, Diane Green was appointed to lead Google’s cloud push efforts that same year.

For Friendships Or Job Searches?

When I look at my Facebook feed, I’ll often see my friends using their status update to ask their network for job openings.  Now, Facebook has confirmed it had begun experimenting with recruiting features: “We’re running a test for Page admins to create job postings and receive applications from candidates.” The company is also actively investing more in functionality for recruiters and employers, giving them the ability to share job opportunities that are specifically visible to an audience that matches their standards (for example, the level of education required).

From a recruiter’s standpoint, Facebook is a goldmine, because it is such a huge repository of information about people. Individuals share a wide variety of data about themselves on their social media, from their basic information to their education level, their current employment, and their personal interests. If you want to gain an exhaustive profile of a candidate, you can’t do much better than Facebook.

As Facebook is already a definitive part of our daily lives, it’s not surprising that it could play an important role in the job searching industry. But do they run the same risks as platforms such as LinkedIn, where personal information becomes more curated to attract a certain job? Will people be pumping up their own profiles, not always accurately? The beauty of Facebook’s “raw and real” data may be quickly lost once people know recruiters are able to mine their information.

As both Facebook and Google enter the space, it confirms yet again that the rate of developments in our space is blinding, and that the new year might bring a few more tricks to learn yet.

About the Author:

Megan Flamer

Megan Flamer is an organizational development specialist who is fascinated by how people find and interact with their work and each other. She writes about recruitment, HR, human behaviour, and the future of work at 1-Page.com

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Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn | Google+

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Reasons Why You Need to Start Hiring Interims as a Savvy Business!

Reasons Why You Need to Start Hiring Interims as a Savvy Business!

Four reasons small businesses should consider interim and contract worker

Four reasons small businesses should consider interim and contract workers

Gone are the days when interim and contract work was done by low-skilled employees and restricted to the realms of admin and support in a company. Interim workers today are highly skilled and function across career fields, playing a key role in sustaining businesses and the economy. Interims can fill short-term skills gaps while saving employers money – a big reason why small businesses ought to be considering them as part of their growth plans. In this article, we discuss the benefits hiring temporary workers provides.

Cost savings

One of the biggest advantages of interim employees is the positive impact they have on the company budget. Because they are hired to fill a short-term need, they can be paid for a fixed amount of work. They do not require long-term contracts, nor do they need benefits like healthcare, pension funds, paid leave and other extras. This means that they can be given a good wage, while keeping expenditure lean. Cost savings in this area can help companies to expand and reach the point where they are able to create permanent positions for the same or different employees.

Risk reduction

Small businesses and start-ups face big risks while they are getting off the ground. This includes financial risks, as well as staffing issues. It is advisable for businesses to keep their operations as small and as streamlined as possible initially, keeping the number of full-time employees and overheads to a minimum. They can build the team as they establish themselves.

Hiring interim workers is an intelligent solution; they can be brought in to support a small core staff component. At the same time, the employer does not have to worry about being locked into a cumbersome contract with someone who may turn out to be an imperfect fit for the job – and a cost to the company.

Need fulfillment

Many small businesses have seasonal bursts of productivity where they need a few extra hands on deck to assist. They may also have permanent staff going on parental or sick leave. These are ideal situations for interim workers. They can be hired to meet demand for the duration of the big project or leave, and be let go (as per agreement) when it comes to an end. Their need for income and work is met, as is the company’s short-term skills gap.

Flexibility

Relying on interim employees gives small businesses a great deal of flexibility, while providing access to top talent. Many experienced workers have been retrenched, are in between jobs, or have chosen to do temporary work for lifestyle reasons. They can contribute to a small business on terms that are accommodating of both their own and the employer’s needs.

If the interim employees make such a good impression that the business decides they would like to offer them a full-time position, this is always an option. Many interim and contract workers transition to permanent employees in this way. The initial contract can serve as an excellent way of testing the waters for both parties.

InteriMarket connects interim job seekers with the posts best suited to them by using intelligent data. To find out more, sign up for a free account today.


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Learn to Love Not Loath the Technical Interview

Job Interview

The Potential Stress of Technical Interviews

Technical recruiters should take heed, it’s really important to help ease the nerves of developers as they prepare for their technical interviews for programming positions. Going in with the right mindset and game-plan is critical for landing the job. Crelate offers some ‘inside’ information from John Franti of Epicodus – a vocational school for aspiring programmers.

The technical interview is the most nerve-wracking part of the hiring process for most new or junior developers. Probably for most developers, full-stop. Programmers with years of accumulated experience and confidence report the same doubts, nerves, and anxieties every time the interviewer points to the whiteboard.

Jerry Maguire

And why wouldn’t we? A search for the term “technical interview” in the Computers & Technology section on Amazon returned 710 responses. Among the books that are “must-haves” for junior developers are Cracking the Coding Interview and Elements of Programming Interviews. Both are great resources and immensely helpful, but if you don’t have time to read the books here are a few things to ponder.

Seemingly Everyone has an Opinion for how to Prepare

Everyone should prepare for any interview, but there can be a hidden message communicated by this flood of guidance, advice, and “insider” information: The technical part of your interview is a terrifying experience that will haunt you and ruin your future.

Additionally, there is no widely acknowledged difference in the literature between the skills needed to successfully interview for a job, or work as a systems architect at Google or Facebook and a junior front-end or back-end developer at an agency, or start-up. To believe the conventional wisdom, everyone needs to be a “10x haxxor”, a “ninja”. This is whatJacob Kaplan-Moss called the Programming Talent Myth. There are few great programmers, and everyone else is untalented and unfit to work as a programmer. Wrong. Instead, Kaplan-Moss tries to enforce the idea that programming skills follow the same bell curve as any other set of skills. By this theory there are a few extremely talented people, a very few uniquely unskilled individuals, and the majority of programmers fall somewhere in the middle of the pack.

It’s no wonder that so many developers suffer from imposter syndrome or even fail to apply for relevant jobs for fear of being unqualified given the high bar of success that is often set. This doesn’t have to be the case. I’ve helped hundreds of students in my role at Epicodus prepare for their very first programming interviews. There are direct carryovers from the skills a person has at the keyboard to the skills needed at the whiteboard.

Think of the Technical Interview as a Conversation

Silicon Valley, Part-1

A good technical interview should be a conversation. It should not be a test of knowledge. A technical interview is best used when it evaluates how a candidate thinks and works, not evaluating what they know. The candidate’s resume, and the non-whiteboard part of the interview should be sufficient to determine if they have experience with the required languages, frameworks, and concepts. As an interviewee, if you’re asked to whiteboard, that’s great news – the interviewer knows you have the skills to work through a difficult question, and wants to see how you do so.

Tips & Tricks for the Technical Interview

So, what are some good practices?

I love the idea of treating each technical question like a mini-project. First, have the interviewer repeat the question. Second, listen carefully, and write down a list of specs. Where? On the whiteboard, of course.

Again, you’re showing how you work. You work from a list of specs, like the good, professional developer you are. Therefore, once the specs are listed, read them back and start looking for keywords and easy requirements that will help you answer the question.

* Are you writing a function? Get the word function and some curly braces up on the board.

* Does the function accept any kind of argument? Get it in the parens.

* Does the function return a value? Let’s put a return statement at the end of the function.

Easy, right?

A Couple More Words of Wisdom

Silicon Valley, Part-2

The purpose of all this boilerplate, or any similar setup is to give ourselves a familiar work space. Further, it’s how we write functions when we’re in our text editor – why would it be any different just because it’s ink and not pixels? It also gets some information on the board, and can get you thinking.

Are you stuck, or do you need to test your algorithm? Draw a box on the whiteboard and list your variables and their initial values inside. This box represents machine memory during the process. Next, pass some test data into your function and talk through the behavior with the interviewer while changing the values within the box. By doing live, manual testing this often can help the interviewee get unstuck.

And of course, it’s alright to say “I don’t know” as long as you finish with the word “…yet.” Then, go forward with the interviewer. How would you go about finding out? What terms would you search for? Where have you seen similar behavior? Keep communicating and showing how you think.

A Note for Interviewers

Finally, for interviewers who may be reading this, because the goal of the technical interview is how we think and not what we know, the question itself doesn’t need to be that hard. A new programmer can show just as much knowledge writing a factorial algorithm as they can solving an advanced sorting problem. The way the thought process is communicated is often what stands out.

You can check out a few more simple tips within my lesson at Learn How to Program.


Source: Learn to Love Not Loath the Technical Interview – Crelate

The Future of Recruiting and Hiring with AI

Future of HR Tech

Talent acquisition can be one of the most time consuming and frustrating aspects of business. Harsh deadlines and specific requirements, not to mention the piles of applications and resumes, is tough for any recruiter. Tack on retention accountability, candidate experience and employer branding and the job becomes even harder. The emerging HR technology throughout the last decade has strived to take away these many frustrations while improving candidate experience and quality of hire.

The buzz around artificial intelligence this year is being shrugged off by many as just a new word HR got ahold of, but what would happen if AI was actually embraced by the recruiting and hiring world? What could it do to further practices and solve problems? This is exactly what Karen.ai are trying to do. How is AI enabled software aiming to better recruitment and the candidate experience?

  1. Candidate Matching

Matching the right candidates to the right positions, that’s the name of the game, but it’s not as easy as it may sound. 52% of recruiters say the hardest part of their job is identifying the right candidates from a large applicant pool. Resume parsing and keyword search advances within an ATS has made the sifting and shifting of this task a bit easier as it picks up on keywords in resumes and cover letters to pull ones that match the most. But as we’ve traversed from keyword matching, to semantic search and contextual search, it’s clear we have not perfected Artificial Intelligence in candidate matching just yet. Today’s products are using Natural Language Processing for even more efficient and learning tools.

75% of job seekers’ chances of landing an interview are killed by errors in the ATS or by restrictive keyword search parameters. Limiting the search to a set amount of keywords does not always guarantee the most qualified candidate or best fit for the job requirements. However, Karen, an Artificial Intelligence software we built specifically for recruiting and hiring, builds off the basic keyword search, broadening the results with a more advanced version that includes semantic search, contextual search and integrates candidate chat conversations, eliminating fuzzy matches.

The ability to find concepts hidden in text, in addition to traditional keyword search will give recruiters a more complete look at the candidate’s qualifications and help improve the candidate matching process. In addition, this new software will take the information learned from the resume and cover letters to potentially help match candidates to jobs they may be better fit for within the company during and after the application process.

  1. Candidate Rank and Score

In addition to pulling out the most qualified candidates for the position based on keywords and concepts, recruiters and hiring managers are expected to then select the best ones to move on in the process. Many use the rank and score method based on what was found within the resume and cover letter. Artificial intelligence is now helping recruiters do this faster by leveraging big data and predictive analytics. Some companies that already do this include Hiredscore and Ideal.com.

While this helps professionals get to the next step in the hiring process quicker, what seems to be missing is the interaction with the candidates and those who did not make it to the next step in the process.

A study conducted by CareerBuilder found an astonishing 75% of people said they didn’t hear back from the company to which they applied. This is where the ATS black hole comes into play and how Artificial Intelligence can help fight it. Karen steps into the process from the beginning, conversing with candidates, learning from their interactions and assimilating the data into a decision: continue down the pipeline or exit in a brand-minded way. In either scenario, Karen ensures the candidate knows where they stand.

  1. Conversation Service for Candidate Engagement and Brand Experience

The ATS black hole is something of which many recruiters and candidates are all too familiar. 74% of job seekers say a clear timeline of the hiring process is what could improve their candidate experience the most, according to a report by applicant tracking systems consulting website Software Advice. Candidates want to be kept in the loop but for many recruiters, staying in contact with all of the applicants and notifying them of each step in the hiring process is next to impossible.

Automated emails have helped this frustration as it’s easy to send an email to a couple dozen candidates letting them know they weren’t the right fit for the position or they are moving on in the process. The problem with this automation, though, is a lack of brand experience and personality. Automated emails are also not as good keeping the candidates fully engaged in the process.

Enter Karen. Chatbots have been affecting our world by advancing customer support to helping users book a flight and now they’re here to advance the world of recruiting. By using an active chatbot to communicate and engage with candidates, AI could solve the problems of the ATS black hole.

A chatbot guides candidates through the application process, take insights learned from resumes and ask candidates questions to assess their level of engagement and keep them informed about where they are in the process. Although platforms like Wade & Wendy and Mya have these abilities as well, Karen is the first to take the information learned from the chat and combine it with the scoring and ranking capabilities to present the recruiter with the best possible candidate for the position. This chat capability will also increase the brand experience for the candidate as 78% of candidates will tell their friends and family about their bad experience and 34% will post about it on social media.

Tie all these functions together and you have a winning combination of matching, scoring and ranking, and chat capabilities that will help ease the recruiter frustrations and build a bridge between the disconnect of employers and job seekers. Prior to the cognitive computing era, enterprise companies would manually review resumes or at best use keyword matching to prioritize internal and external candidate submissions. Using AI, like Karen, to improve these tactics can lower time-to-hire for recruiters and engage candidates.

Want to learn more about Karen? Visit karen.ai or read more about the creation in this press release.

Find Karen on Social Media: Twitter | LinkedIn

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