AI – The Present in the Making

AI – The Present in the Making

I attended the Huawei European Innovation Day recently, and was enthralled by how the new technology is giving rise to industrial revolutions. These revolutions are what will eventually unlock the development potential around the world. It is important to leverage the emerging technologies, since they are the resources which will lead us to innovation and progress. Huawei is innovative in its partnerships and collaboration to define the future, and the event was a huge success.

For many people, the concept of Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a thing of the future. It is the technology that has yet to be introduced. But Professor Jon Oberlander disagrees. He was quick to point out that AI is not in the future, it is now in the making. He began by mentioning Alexa, Amazon’s star product. It’s an artificial intelligent personal assistant, which was made popular by Amazon Echo devices. With a plethora of functions, Alexa quickly gained much popularity and fame. It is used for home automation, music streaming, sports updates, messaging and email, and even to order food.

With all these skills, Alexa is still in the stages of being updated as more features and functions are added to the already long list. This innovation has certainly changed the perspective of AI being a technology of the future. Al is the past, the present, and the future.

Valkyrie is another example of how AI exists in the present. There are only a handful of these in the world, and one of them is owned by NASA. They are a platform for establishing human-robot interaction, and were built in 2013 by a Johnson Space Center (JSC) Engineering directorate. This humanoid robot is designed to be able to work in damaged and degraded environments.

The previous two were a bit too obvious. Let’s take it a notch higher.

The next thing on Professor Jon Oberlander’s list was labeling images on search engines. For example, if we searched for an image of a dog, the search engine is going to show all the images that contain a dog, even if it’s not a focal point. The connected component labeling is used in computer vision, and is another great example of how AI is developing in present times.

Over the years, machine translation has also gained popularity as numerous people around the world rely on these translators. Over the past year, there has been a massive leap forward in the quality of machine translations. There has definitely been a dramatic increase in the quality as algorithms are revised and new technology is incorporated to enhance the service.

To start with a guess, and end up close to the truth. That’s the basic ideology behind Bayes Rule, a law of conditional probability.

But how did we get here? All these great inventions and innovations have played a major role in making AI a possibility in the present. And these four steps led us to this technological triumph;

  • Starting
  • Coding
  • Learning
  • Networking

Now that we are here, where would this path take us? It has been a great journey so far, and it’s bound to get more exciting in the future. The only way we can eventually end up fulfilling our goals is through;

  • Application
  • Specialization
  • Hybridization
  • Explanation

With extensive learning systems, it has become imperative to devise fast changing technologies, which will in turn facilitate the spread of AI across the world. With technologies such as deep fine-grained classifier and the Internet of Things, AI is readily gaining coverage. And this is all due to Thomas Bayes, who laid the foundations of intellectual technology.

If you would like to read more from Ronald van Loon on the possibilities of AI, please click Follow and connect with him on LinkedIn and Twitter.


Source: AI – The Present in the Making | Ronald van Loon | Pulse | LinkedIn

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How Long Will Tech Talent Hold The HR Upper Hand? | Featured Image

How Long Will Tech Talent Hold The HR Upper Hand?

Written by Peter Cummings, Founder, DevScore.

How Long Will Tech Talent Hold The HR Upper Hand? | Main Image

When it comes to demand for IT talent; developers, coders, and programmers have never had it so good. But do those making these key hires always know what they’re buying? As Peter Cummings, Founder, DevScore, wonders how long recruiters can stay on the backfoot for.

Peter Cummings, DevScore
Peter Cummings is a highly sought after IT Specialist with expert knowledge in three distinct fields; IT Security, Cloud Computing and Development.

Recruiting for niche IT positions continues to be a problem. It’s not that there’s (necessarily) a shortage of talent, but as demand for connected devices and Internet of Things technology starts to gain traction, organisations that have never before hired software developers and programmers now find themselves in desperate need of them. Yesterday.

Great news for us techies, right? Well, kinda. The thing is we need to make sure that what we’re being hired to do, is exactly what the companies hiring us need us to actually do. That might sound odd, but if (like me) you’ve been in the dev game for a good few years, you’ll appreciate the challenge of being led tentatively towards a role that your skills aren’t the best fit for, or being ushered into an organisation where the need initially identified isn’t quite as urgent as first thought.

With the shoe on the other foot for a moment — it’s hard for those tasked with hiring us to keep track of IT demands. Not just because IT has a pretty steep learning curve; but it’s constantly changing. A lot of HRs and recruiters don’t know what they don’t know. They lack the depth of technical knowledge needed to hire the right coder for the job — because they aren’t coders themselves.

Conventional wisdom just doesn’t apply. Illustrating a developer’s breadth of expertise using just a CV doesn’t work, so recruiters resort to other methods, doing their best to assess skills through coding tests and other time consuming tasks. Which can often be a massive waste of time for all.

Where development’s concerned, for HR types, getting the right person in place matters more than in most other hires — mostly because we coders come at a premium and are often fought over tooth and nail by different companies.

So how can we demonstrate our skills and expertise in the right way?

Well, first we need to emphasise our specific skillsets and explain how experience and expertise supercede formal education. A lot of software developers are completely self-taught (myself included) and few have any formal education (and we’re in good company considering the likes of Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg swapped education for entrepreneurship).

The fact is the best person for the job might not be who you’d first expect. This fact requires a bit of a mindset shift from a HR perspective. And while skills are inherently difficult to prove, demonstrating impact is a good alternative to coding tests, in-depth interviews, and awkward discussions.

Overall, it’s crucial that companies hire developers that can hit the ground running — for everyone’s benefit. But getting the right fit for any job means helping HRs and recruiters better understand the value you can bring and guiding them through your specific skills — without dazzling them with technical jargon.

Insight like this will ultimately help recruiters and HR managers minimise hiring errors in an increasingly important and costly area of their businesses.

Plus it’ll make your working life a whole lot easier — so you can concentrate on doing the job you were hired to do, rather than pick your way through Jira tickets and technical documentation until the lead dev gets it together…


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Enterprise Journey to Becoming Digital

Do you want to be a digital enterprise? Do you want to master the art of transforming yourself and be at the forefront of the digital realm?

How can you change your business to achieve this?

Derive new values for yourself, and find better and more innovative ways of working. Put customer experience above and beyond everything as you find methodologies to support the rapidly changing demands of the digital world.

Your transformation will be successful only when you identify and practice appropriate principles, embrace a dual strategy that enhances your business capabilities and switch to agile methodologies if you have not done it already.

The journey to becoming a digital maestro and achieving transformation traverses through four main phases.

  • Becoming a top-notch expert with industrialized IT services – by adopting six main principles
  • Switching to agile operations to achieve maximum efficiency – so that you enjoy simplicity, rationality and automation
  • Creating an engaging experience for your consumers using analytics, revenue and customer management – because your customers come first; their needs and convenience should be your topmost priority
  • Availing opportunities for digital services – assessing your security and managing your risks

Becoming a top-notch expert with industrialized IT services

There are five key transformation principles that can help you realize the full potential of digital operations and engagement.

  • Targeting uniqueness that is digitized
  • Designing magical experiences so as to engage and retain your consumers
  • Connect with digital economics, and collaborate so as to leverage your assets
  • Operate your business digitally, customer experience being the core
  • Evolving into a fully digital organization through the side by side or incremental approach

Initially a digital maturity analysis has to be performed, followed by adoption of a targeted operational model. Maturity can be divided into five different levels: initiating, enabling, integrating, optimizing and pioneering, which are linked to seven different aspects: strategy, organization, customer, technology, operations, ecosystem and innovation, of which the last two are the most critical. The primary aim should be to cover all business areas that are impacted by and impact digital transformation.

Before taking a digital leap, the application modernization wheel should be adopted. Identify your targets, which will act as main drivers. Determine application states, and then come up with a continuous plan. This is referred to as the Embark phase, during which you understand the change rationale of your applications, and then improve metrics, which drive changes. During the Realize phase, you analyze ways in which you can change your operations and speed up your delivery. In the process, you have to improve quality, while ensuring your product line is aligned with your business needs. You establish DevOps, beginning from small teams, and then moving forward using new technologies.

The third phase is Modernize, during which you plan and implement your architecture such that your apps are based on API services. The last stage is Optimize in which performance is monitored, and improvements are made when and where they are necessary.

Switching to agile operations to achieve maximum efficiency

Data centers now feature several applications, suitable for the IT, telecommunication and enterprise sectors, but their offered services have to be responsive to the changing trends and demands. Ericsson brings agility into the picture so as to achieve efficiency through automation. This can be made possible with the NFV Full Stack, which includes a cloud manager, execution environment, SDN controllers and NFV hardware. The solution is capable to support automated deployment while providing you flexibility through multi VIM support. Check out this blog post to see a demonstration of a virtualized, datacenter and explore their vision of future digital infrastructure.

NFV’s potential can be fully achieved only when the hybrid networks are properly managed, which dynamic orchestration makes a possibility. The approach taken automates service design, configuration and assurance for both physical and virtual networks. Acceleration of network virtualization is being realized through the Open Platform for Network Functions Virtualization (OPNFV), a collaborative project under the Linux Foundation that is transforming global networks through open source NFV. Ericsson is a platinum-level founding OPNFV member, along with several other telecom vendors, service providers and IT companies leading the charge in digitalized infrastructure.

Creating an engaging experience for your consumers

Customer experience is the central focus when you are in the digital realm. Customer experience should be smooth, effortless and consistent across all channels.

Design a unique omnichannel approach for your customers. This means that you should be able to reach out to your customers through mobile app, social media platforms and even wearable gadgets. Analyze real-time data, and use the results for improving purchase journeys obvert different channels like chatbots and augmented reality. Advanced concepts like clustering and machine learning are used to cross data over different domains, and then take appropriate actions. For instance, if you were a Telco, you should be able to offer a new plan, bundle or upgrade to each customer at the right time. All of the analytics data can also be visualized for a complete understanding through which the customer journey can be identified, and the next best action can be planned out.

Availing opportunities for digital services

Complexity increases when all your systems are connected, and security becomes a more important concern. You should be able to identify new vulnerabilities and threat vectors, and then take steps to protect your complete system. And this protection should extend to your revenues, and help you prevent fraud.

A Security Manager automates security over the cloud as well as physical networks. The two primary components are Security Automation and 360 Design and Monitoring. New assets are detected as security is hardened, which are then monitored continuously.

Additionally the Digital Risk and Business Assurance enable your business to adapt in the dynamic environment while reducing impact on your bottom line. Assurance features three levels: marketplace, prosumer and wholesale assurance. The end result is delivery of a truly digital experience.

Want proof that the above methodologies do work wonders? Two of Ericsson customers, Verizon and Jio, have already been nominated as finalists for the TM Forum EXCELLENCE Awards.

I also encourage you to join and/or follow TM Forum Live this week. If you’re headed to the conference, be sure to check out the Ericsson booth and connect with the team to learn more and discuss your digital transformation journey.

If you would like to read more from Ronald van Loon on the possibilities of Big Data and IoT please click 'Follow' and connect on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Source: Enterprise Journey to Becoming Digital | Ronald van Loon | Pulse | LinkedIn

From New Technology to ‘Purposeful Innovation’ – Three Trends That Can Help Businesses Innovate & Grow in 2017

Written by Himanshu Palsule, CTO at Epicor Software.

From New Technology to ‘Purposeful Innovation’ – Three Trends That Can Help Businesses Innovate & Grow in 2017

In the current climate, operational efficiency and business agility are more important than ever to support modern business innovation. As global markets combine with competitive pricing pressures to place greater stress on maintaining margins, organisations must seek the efficiencies needed to protect market share.

Himanshu Palsule, CTO at Epicor Software
Himanshu Palsule, CTO at Epicor Software

At the same time, global economic forces are opening up opportunities in new markets and organisations of all sizes are looking to take advantage of the changing economic tide to grow their business. The pressure is now on the CIO and his/her team to drive change and enable this high-growth mode. The challenge for many companies is matching technology investments with the rapidly changing needs of the business.

A solid technology strategy should place the onus on innovation with a purpose and going in to 2017, I see three technology trends that have the power to transform businesses by providing the tools to innovate. These technologies have the potential to be central to business success over the coming years.

  1. Enabling cloud-driven change

For some organisations, adopting cloud computing services can be a simple, tactical exercise to meet some immediate infrastructure needs. But for those looking to drive real technology transformation, it can be the catalyst to embracing an entirely new strategy for IT.

Up until recently cloud computing has, for the most part, been used to speed up existing individual processes while reducing costs. It is only now, as the cloud journey grows more mature, that we can begin to see its full potential to transform business models and working practices.

The cloud opens up exciting new possibilities for CIOs, COOs and CFOs to think differently about their IT infrastructure. Adoption of cloud-based enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, for example, is on the rise because sharing data quickly and efficiently can dramatically reduce costs and increase the speed of production.

There’s also a growing acceptance that cloud adoption is not just for start-up companies. Large enterprises are transitioning their entire infrastructure and data ecosystems into the cloud because these systems have the advantage of taking the burden of upgrades and management, freeing up valuable resources to focus on innovation and business growth.

  1. Extracting value from big data and IoT

According to a recent report by Machina Research, the total number of IoT connections are estimated to grow 16% annually over the next 10-year period from 6 billion in 2015 to 27 billion in 2025. Total IoT revenue opportunity is projected to grow to $3 trillion in 2025, up from $750 billion in 2015.

If you talk to customers in the manufacturing and retail sectors for example, they’ll say they’ve been collecting and tracking data on machines, production, and inventory for years. In retail, for example, smart supply chains enable applications for tracking goods and real time information exchange about inventory among suppliers and retailers.

The next step for us, and our customers, is to take the data that is available and analyse it in context, to make better and more efficient business decisions. However, the challenge for ERP systems has been around how to transform the onslaught of unstructured data into practical information.

As technology develops we can expect to see more integration between ERP, big data and predictive analytics because data is the business resource of the future—both in terms of optimising processes and services, and as a basis for innovative business models.

  1. Mobility drives greater visibility

Mobile and social technologies are enabling new business models and processes but it’s important to remember that mobility can mean many different things to different organisations. For one company, it might be the ability to set up a remote warehouse. For another, it might be the ability to interact and collaborate on social platforms across borders and time zones.

Mobility should be an essential part of the platforms we build as mobile applications provide greater employee visibility and accuracy of information, enabling companies to respond quickly to changing demands with real-time capabilities.

New utilisations of mobile devices and apps are happening every day and drastically changing the way business gets done.

Summary — keeping up the pace of innovation

As companies become more complex and globally dispersed, the need for increased collaboration, visibility and efficiency will continue to accelerate. The world is getting smaller and supply chains are expected to get faster. Having the right technology in place to underpin operations is key to keeping up, regardless of geographic location or industry.

Technology on its own is not a sufficient strategy. But understanding how cloud, big data, social, mobility, analytics and IoT technologies can underpin business models, what we call ‘purposeful innovation’ is central to achieving business growth.


If you want to share this article the reference to Himanshu Palsule and The HR Tech Weekly® is obligatory.

How Tech Is Reshaping ‘Business As Usual’

Kyle Martin, Florida Polytechnic University

Written by Kyle Martin, Content Coordinator at Florida Polytechnic University. Specially for The HR Tech Weekly®.

Change is the only constant, and it’s only accelerating. Technology is taking us closer and closer to the futuristic worlds we once only imagined in science fiction, but questions remain. How is innovative technology changing the way we do business? How will it continue to change in years to come? Keep an eye on the following trends that will continue to reshape business as we know it and introduce brand new STEM careers:

The Machines: They’re Learning!

Artificial Intelligence is more than a buzzword; it’s real and it’s happening now. Systems that can learn and adapt are becoming part of numerous industries, from Salesforce’s analytics service to products like crystal for marketing. Intelligent systems apply learning from one user to improve all users’ experience. (This is rumored to also be coming in digital assistant Siri’s future). Natural language processing allows us to consult AI programs like we would another person, asking questions like “When should I post on Instagram for maximum engagement?” and receive a more accurate answer faster than ever before.

IoT Integration

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a revolution in connectivity; items and devices equipped with sensors and controllers can now communicate with one another. These smart machines assist with everything from household chores to improving supply chain management, and they relay pertinent information about user behavior and machine processes.

Improving supply chain efficiencies is a growing application of the IoT. The IoT allows supply chain managers to meticulously track products and make smarter decisions based on pre-programmed parameters. The IoT also produces real-time data, allowing consumers to know exactly when their packages will arrive, and supply chain managers an understanding of how well each facet of their supply chain is performing.

The IoT offers numerous benefits for managers and consumers alike. Managers can better understand system bottlenecks and prevent machine breakdown. Consumers have the satisfaction of knowing they can monitor their shipment in real-time. While the upfront cost of integrating intelligent machines might initially turn companies off, their ability to improve operations make them more economical in the long term.

New Levels of Co-Creation

One of the many benefits of the Internet is its capacity for widespread collaboration. Today, that collaboration is going one step further. Many companies are now leveraging co-creation, allowing consumers to contribute to the development of new products and services. This new level of cooperation between brands and their buyers empowers consumers to create the exact product or service they need. In return, businesses reduce the costs associated with assessing the current product market and determining what to produce next.

This theme of co-creation also includes companies hiring freelance specialists. Companies are no longer compromising the quality of their employees, and ultimately their business, because of geographic distance. With virtually no more borders or geographic limitations, this new trend is altering the way businesses hire and retain employees.

In the face of a rapidly evolving market, more job seekers are choosing technology-focused degree programs to keep their skills sharp and their knowledge up-to-date. Why? Because business owners and professionals must stay ahead of the changing technology tides in order to ensure continued success.

About the Author:

Kyle Martin brings 11 years of storytelling experience to the content coordinator position at Florida Polytechnic University. In this role, Martin develops original content showcasing the University experience as a way to attract new students and faculty. He also lends editorial direction to University departments launching new projects and campaigns.


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Global Study Reveals Businesses and Countries Vulnerable Due to Shortage of Cybersecurity Talent

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Intel Corporation
2200 Mission College Blvd.
Santa Clara, CA 95054-1549

Global Study Reveals Businesses and Countries Vulnerable Due to Shortage of Cybersecurity Talent

82 Percent of IT Professionals Confirm Shortfall in Cybersecurity Workforce 

News Highlights:

  • New report by Intel Security and CSIS reveals current cybersecurity talent crisis
  • Cybersecurity skills shortage is worse than talent deficits in other IT professions.
  • Shortage in cybersecurity skills is responsible for significant damages.
  • Talent shortage is largest for individuals with highly technical skills.
  • Hands-on training and practical training are perceived as better ways to develop skills than through traditional education resources.

Dubai, United Arab Emirates – August 01, 2016 – Intel Security, in partnership with the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), recently released Hacking the Skills Shortage, a global report outlining the talent shortage crisis impacting the cybersecurity industry across both companies and nations. A majority of respondents (82 percent) admit to a shortage of cybersecurity skills, with 71 percent of respondents citing this shortage as responsible for direct and measurable damage to organizations whose lack of talent makes them more desirable hacking targets.

“A shortage of people with cybersecurity skills results in direct damage to companies, including the loss of proprietary data and IP,” said James A Lewis, senior vice president and director of the Strategic Technologies Program at CSIS. “This is a global problem; a majority of respondents in all countries surveyed could link their workforce shortage to damage to their organization.”

Despite 1 in 4 respondents confirming their organizations have lost proprietary data as a result of their cybersecurity skills gap, there are no signs of this workforce shortage abating in the near-term. Respondents surveyed estimate an average of 15 percent of cybersecurity positions in their company will go unfilled by 2020. With the increase in cloud, mobile computing and the Internet of Things, as well as advanced targeted cyberattacks and cyberterrorism across the globe, the need for a stronger cybersecurity workforce is critical.

Raj Samani
Raj Samani, VP & CTO, EMEA, Intel Security

“The security industry has talked at length about how to address the storm of hacks and breaches, but government and the private sector haven’t brought enough urgency to solving the cybersecurity talent shortage,” said Raj Samani, VP & CTO, EMEA, Intel Security. “To address this workforce crisis, we need to foster new education models, accelerate the availability of training opportunities, and we need to deliver deeper automation so that talent is put to its best use on the frontline. Finally, we absolutely must diversify our ranks.”

The demand for cybersecurity professionals is outpacing the supply of qualified workers, with highly technical skills the most in need across all countries surveyed. In fact, skills such as intrusion detection, secure software development and attack mitigation were found to be far more valued than softer skills including collaboration, leadership and effective communication.

This report studies four dimensions that comprise the cybersecurity talent shortage, which include:

  1. Cybersecurity Spending: The size and growth of cybersecurity budgets reveals how countries and companies prioritize cybersecurity. Unsurprisingly, countries and industry sectors that spend more on cybersecurity are better placed to deal with the workforce shortage, which according to 71 percent of respondents, has resulted in direct and measurable damage to their organization’s security networks.
  2. Education and Training: Only 23 percent of respondents say education programs are preparing students to enter the industry. This report reveals non-traditional methods of practical learning, such as hands-on training, gaming and technology exercises and hackathons, may be a more effective way to acquire and grow cybersecurity skills. More than half of respondents believe that the cybersecurity skills shortage is worse than talent deficits in other IT professions, placing an emphasis on continuous education and training opportunities.
  3. Employer Dynamics: While salary is unsurprisingly the top motivating factor in recruitment, other incentives are important in recruiting and retaining top talent, such as training, growth opportunities and reputation of the employer’s IT department. Almost half of respondents cite lack of training or qualification sponsorship as common reasons for talent departure.

Recommendations for Moving Forward:

  • Redefine minimum credentials for entry-level cybersecurity jobs: accept non-traditional sources of education
  • Diversify the cybersecurity field
  • Provide more opportunities for external training
  • Identify technology that can provide intelligent security automation
  • Collect attack data and develop better metrics to quickly identify threats

For more information on these findings, along with Intel Security’s proposed recommendations, read the full report: Hacking the Skills Shortage: A study of the international shortage in cybersecurity skills.

About Intel Security:

Intel Security, with its McAfee product line, is dedicated to making the digital world safer and more secure for everyone. Intel Security is a division of Intel Corporation. Learn more at www.intelsecurity.com.

Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.

*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

Contacts:

Vernon SaldanhaVernon Saldanha

Procre8 (on behalf of Intel Security)

vernon@procre8.biz

 

IoT – How the Internet of Things Is Driving a Knowledge Revolution

IoT

Think about a few things in your life right now. It really doesn’t matter what they are, as long as you interact with them daily. They could be your phone, your shoes, your watch, your car, your refrigerator, your garage door opener… you get the idea. What do all of these things have in common (besides you, of course)? Well, at the moment, they may not have much of anything in common, but within the next decade, you can expect every last one of them to have Wi-Fi connections to the Internet.

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Ronald van Loon, Director at Adversitement

The Internet of Things is an interesting concept because, on one level, it’s still largely theoretical, but on another it’s already a network that you use every single day. The strict definition of the Internet of Things (IoT) right now is, per the Oxford English Dictionary, “A proposed development of the Internet in which everyday objects have network connectivity, allowing them to send and receive data.”

As much as it’s still a “proposed” development, though, we’re seeing a lot more than proposals in the IoT. As just one example, are you one of the millions of people around the world using fitness trackers to check their daily activity and caloric output? Fit bits, heart rate monitors, and other activity and fitness tracking devices were arguably some of the first “things” in the Internet of Things to come into widespread use.

Just a few years ago, if you wanted to shed a few pounds, you might go on a diet or start running a few miles a week. Now you can download an app to track your intake and track calories out with your fitness tracking device. And, because everything is connected, you can get all of the data you need in one place. Instead of counting calories and guessing at how much you need to run, swim, bike, or lift, you have all of the information you need in your pocket at any time, and your activities get logged automatically.

“How the Internet of Things Is Driving a Knowledge Revolution”


Data, Information, and Knowledge

So how is your Fitbit going to drive a knowledge revolution? Well, when you connect your fitness tracker to your diet app, the two can work together to automatically tell you how much and what you need to eat to stay on track with your goals. They do this by recording data and parsing it into information that you or I can understand. Then, when that information is put in the context of a fitness plan, you have a lot more knowledge about your current fitness level, your goals, and your progress than you had before, all without doing any research on your own.

Now, imagine taking this example to a whole new level. As more and more of our devices and “things” are connected, they share more and more data, translate it into information that we can understand, and deliver it to us in contexts that create more knowledge than we’ve ever had access to before. With knowledge about our fitness and diet needs, the energy efficiency of our homes and cars, and much, much more, we will not be constrained by our natural memories or the time it takes to research these topics.

Instead, we can use the knowledge that’s being pushed to our fingertips on our phones, laptops, tablets, and smart watches to work faster, exercise more effectively, and enjoy more time with our friends and family.

So what do you think of the IoT and the coming knowledge revolution? Has it already affected you in some ways?

Let us know about your current experiences and predictions for the future of knowledge and the Internet of Things.

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Source: IoT – How the Internet of Things Is Driving a Knowledge Revolution | Ronald van Loon | LinkedIn