10 Simple Steps to Improve Candidate Experience?

10 Simple Steps to Improve Candidate Experience?

Improve-Candidate-Experience-steps

Improving candidate experience is a must if you want to win in a war for talent. The current job market is candidate driven, which means you don’t pick talent anymore. Talent picks you. That’s why it is absolutely necessary to start improving candidate experience right now.

Read on and learn how to attract and recruit top talent in 10 simple steps!

The recruiting game has changed

Candidate experience is more than just another passing HR trend. The way we recruit has changed. Current job market is candidate driven. That means you don’t pick talent anymore. Talent picks you, and they do it based on their candidate experience.That’s why it is absolutely necessary for your company to ace candidate experience.

candidate-experience.png

Candidate experience definition

Candidate experience” is current, past and potential future candidates’ overall perception of your company’s recruiting process.

It is the product of candidates’ feelings, behaviours and attitudes they experience during the whole recruiting process, from sourcing and screening to interviewing, hiring and finally onboarding.

Steps to improve candidate experience

1. Write a clear job description

A recent Talent Board report found that job descriptions are the most important job related content. Write a clear and accurate explanation of the job and responsibilities, salary range, perks and benefits and company values.

Pro Tip: Writing a job description that attracts candidates is the very first step in finding the right candidate. To help you save time, we have created free most common job descriptions templates and samples, ready to use and post to multiple job boards with just one click.

2. Be transparent about your recruiting process

Setting expectations about the recruitment process is very important in delivering a positive candidate experience. According to research, 83% of candidates say it would greatly improve
their overall experience if employers could set expectations about the recruiting process.

Pro Tip: It is crucial for you to make clear what exactly your hiring process will look like. Offer resources and tips to help candidates. A great example is Google’s How We Hire,
a transparent and detailed look into their recruiting process.

3. Improve your career site

According to research, 89% of job seekers, your career site is the most visited recruiting asset you have, so ensuring candidates can easily find the information they need is essential to a great experience.

career-site

Pro Tip: There are many things you can do to improve and optimize your career site. We prepared a detailed step by step guide to help you get more job applicants from your career site.

4. Enable easy application process

According to research, 60 percent of job seekers quit in the middle of filling out online job applications because of their length or complexity.

candidate-experience-application-form

Pro Tip: Evaluate your application process and do everything you can to make it shorter in time and more simple. Consider asking only what you really need from people at this first point of contact.

5. Respect candidates’ time

According to LinkedIn’s survey, it generally takes 2 to 3 months for candidates to move from application to hire. This is quite problematic, because top talent stays on market only for 10 days.

Pro Tip: What constitutes as a timely response by employers? This a recurring theme across the recruitment experience. Most of the candidates  say that 3 to 5 business days is an acceptable time frame.

6. Communicate, communicate, communicate

Research shows that the No.1 frustration during the overall job search is the lack of response from employers. 81% of candidates that the one main thing that would greatly improve their overall candidate experience is employers continuously communicating status updates to them.

Pro Tip: Create email campaigns that will keep your candidates interested and engaged. Set up personalized campaigns based on different stages of recruiting and hiring process.  With our TalentLfyt Engage, you can create your own email templates, or use existing ones to save time.

7. Become an interview guru

The interview is a pivotal point in the candidate’s’ job search journey. According to LinkedIn research, 83% of talent say a negative interview experience can change their mind about a role or company they once liked.

Here’s our guide on which questions to ask job candidates.

Pro Tip: Keep your interview period short, offer candidates a chance to learn about the role and your company culture. A great way to that is to show off your workplace. A simple walk around your office after interview will give candidates a glimpse into your culture.

8. Give and ask for feedback

Feedback helps candidates improve as professionals, and they are very well aware of that.  According to LinkedIn hiring statistics, 94% of talent wants to receive interview feedback.

Pro Tip: Make sure to provide feedback for candidates that you didn’t hire. If the feedback you offer to rejected candidates is constructive, they will be 4 times more likely to consider your company for a future opportunity.

9. Maintain candidate relationship

Despite popular belief, a candidate’s experience doesn’t end when you decide not to hire them.
So called silver medalist are candidates that don’t make the cut for this position, but may be a perfect fit for some other future job openings.

Pro Tip: So how can you keep your silver medalists interested and engaged? Connect with them on LinkedIn and your company’s social media profiles. Add them to your recruiting email campaigns. Organize talent networking events and invite candidates from your talent pool.

10. Create a great recruitment content

Inbound recruiting creates a remarkable candidate experience through employer branding content and helps companies build relationships with top talent.

Pro tip: Create appealing employee testimonials and stories, shoot attractive company videos and provide interview and career advancement tips to get potential candidates interested in working at your company.

Advertisements
2018 Recruiting Trends: 9 Recruiting Strategies to Implement in 2018

2018 Recruiting Trends: 9 Recruiting Strategies to Implement in 2018

2018-recruiting-trends

This list of 2018 recruiting trends should be your guide for improving your recruiting strategy.

Are you ready to implement these new recruiting trends or will you be left behind?

We live in a candidate driven market

The way we recruit has changed. Compared to just a few years ago, candidates now have far more power during the job search.

According to research and every recruiter and HR professional everyday work experience, current job market is 90% candidate driven. That means you don’t pick talent anymore. Talent picks you!

2018-recruiting-trends

That’s why there is a major shift going on in recruiting paradigm. The focus is now on candidates, who are being treated like customers.

Recruiting trend no. 1: Recruitment marketing

What is recruitment marketing?

Recruitment marketing strategy is based on implementation of marketing tactics in recruiting.

recruiting-trent-recruitment-marketing

The importance of recruitment marketing

Main goal of recruitment marketing is to follow the latest trends in the market and offer solutions to the companies that best overcome these new challenges.

Recruiting trend #2: Inbound recruiting

What is inbound recruiting?

Inbound recruiting is a recruitment marketing strategy where you proactively and continually attract candidates with the goal to make them choose you as their next employer.

 

The importance of inbound recruiting

If you are looking for a long-term solution to advance your recruiting and hiring strategy, inbound recruiting is the way to go.

inbound-recruiting-recruiting-trends-2018.png

Recruiting trend no #3: Employer branding

What is employer brand?

Employer brand is the term commonly used to describe an organization’s reputation and popularity as an employer, and its employee value proposition.

The importance of employer branding

Research by LinkedIn has proven that more than 75% of job seekers research about company’s reputation and employer brand before applying.

employer-branding-recruiting-trends-2018

Recruiting trend #4: Candidate experience

What is candidate experience?

Candidate experience” is current, past and potential future candidates’ overall perception of your company’s recruiting process.

The importance of candidate experience

Candidates who had a positive candidate experience in your recruiting process will more likely accept your job offer, reapply in future and refer others to your company.

candidate-experience

Recruiting trend #5: Talent pools

What is a talent pool?
Talent pool refers to a place or database where recruiters and HR Managers keep all of their top job candidates.

The importance of talent pool

Imagine if every time you had a job opening, you had a pool of talent from which you can just pick the best one! Sounds great, right?

Recruiting trend #6: Candidate relationship management

What is candidate relationship management?

Candidate relationship management (CRM) is a method for managing and improving relationships with current and potential future job candidates.

The importance of candidate relationship management?

This relatively new method in recruiting was introduced to the world of talent acquisition as a solution to one of the biggest challenges in the HR industry – attracting talent.

Recruiting trend #7: Social recruiting

What is social recruiting?

Social recruiting is using social media channels (such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn etc.) for recruiting.

recruiting-trend-social-recruiting

The importance of social recruiting

You can use social media networks to proactively search for potential candidates, build relationship with them and encourage them to apply to your vacant job positions.

Top recruiting trend #8: Recruitment automation tools

What is recruitment automation tools?

Recruitment automation tools are software that use new technology to automate recruiting process.

The importance of recruitment automation tools

These new all in one tools offer help in finding, attracting, engaging, nurturing and converting candidates into applicants.

Many recruiter have agreed that having an ATS improves their quality of hire.

applicant-tracking-system-quality-of-hire.png

Recruiting trend # 9: GDPR

What is GDPR?

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a new piece of EU legislation that will replace the current Data Protection Act (DPA) with the goal to unify data regulations within the EU.

The importance of GDPR

GDPR will be introduced on 25th May 2018 and it will completely change the way recruiting operates in 2018.

 

Two Challenges Facing Healthcare HR

Two Challenges Facing Healthcare HR

As technology races forward and the aging population places greater demands on healthcare staff, the need for competent HR professionals will only continue to grow. Current healthcare professionals as well as HR specialists in other industries should consider advancing within health administration in order to bring their experience to a rapidly expanding field and help shape the future of healthcare. Here are two major challenges healthcare HR departments face along with strategies for successfully combating them.

Adapting to New Technologies

Thanks to advances in healthcare technologies, health providers can monitor and analyze health issues remotely. Fitness trackers, mobile apps, telemedicine platforms, and devices such as remote heart monitors and insulin pumps are giving medical professionals real-time insights into a patient’s medical conditions like never before. However, these also place new demands on HR professionals.

One major responsibility that falls on HR departments is the task of ensuring healthcare professionals are trained to use the constantly evolving array of technologies. Training sessions and other learning opportunities can be particularly challenging in part because hospital staff are often made up of several generations of people. This includes baby boomers who may lack the technical skills to pick up new technologies right away and may need special support. Millennials may also have difficulty adopting new technologies because information systems can vary greatly between facilities they’ve previously worked for.

Although some technology vendors will provide training to healthcare professionals, there are limits to what an individual can learn and retain. In most cases, it isn’t possible to know everything about each device, especially if training takes place infrequently. To combat this, HR professionals can create in-house training initiatives that stand as a resource professionals can return to.

One example of this is to create opportunities for microlearning. This is an effective strategy because it provides specific information at the moment healthcare staff need it. Medical professionals can view short videos that break down difficult concepts or processes into more digestible lessons, after which they can immediately put the information to use. This also cuts down on the amount of time doctors and nurses have to spend away from their current tasks and patients for training.

In addition to their impact on training, new technologies lower a facility’s need for some positions. For example, as the adoption of electronic health record (EHR) systems continues to rise, the tedious and expensive process of transcribing, charting, and duplicating medical information is significantly minimized. These digital systems also reduce the chance of medical errors due to conflicting or incorrect patient information. In addition to EHRs, radio frequency identification (RFID) systems can wirelessly track patients’ conditions and provide instant access to medical records, which will eliminate some low-tech clerical positions.

Responding to Workforce Shortages

Hiring and retaining qualified staff may be the most impactful thing an HR department can do to improve patient outcomes. We’re facing a shortage of healthcare professionals due to a number of factors. For one, our population is aging, which means a higher percentage of people are developing health conditions that require medical attention. The fact that more people are insured also places additional strain on healthcare facilities.

The number of primary care physicians, in particular, is decreasing because fewer physicians are choosing primary care specialties. However, HR professionals can hire alternative staff such as physician assistants or nurse practitioners to help fill this gap. Nurse practitioners can provide a similar level of care to primary physicians, and they have kept an even pace with the demand for their position. As an added bonus, nurse practitioners can provide their services at a lower cost than physicians.

As with any industry, HR departments looking to combat the shortage of healthcare professionals should take advantage of hiring best practices in order to find the right employees. Hiring qualified professionals is essential for positive patient outcomes as well as reducing employee turnover. In order to attract quality talent, healthcare facilities should design compensation packages that meet the financial and lifestyle needs of new medical professionals. This includes things like insurance, retirement plans, paid time off, and something that has become increasingly important — debt relief.

It’s important for HR professionals to work with unit managers when creating job descriptions in order to identify which qualifications are essential to the position and which are simply preferred. They should also avoid setting experience or education requirements higher than necessary in order to draw from a wider pool of worthy applicants. Pre-hiring assessments can reveal qualifications beyond an applicant’s resume, such as their personality and their ability to fit in with the organization’s culture.

The internet has changed the way people find and apply for jobs, and HR professionals should target a variety of channels to advertise an opening. This includes and job boards that cater to healthcare positions as well as social media platforms and university recruitment programs. Employee referrals are also a great resource for discovering qualified applicants who, in many cases, will also stand a good chance of fitting into the culture of the workplace. Internships offer a low-stakes opportunity to work with an employee and test whether they are a good fit.

Finding and hiring the right employees is only one facet to maintaining a successful workforce. Retaining employees should take high priority within healthcare HR. According to one study, employee turnover is the top staffing concern of a third of healthcare recruiters in the United States. And while the exact number isn’t clear, some studies suggest a 28 percent turnover rate in healthcare jobs. Aside from expensive recruiting and training costs, turnover hurts patient satisfaction, places additional burdens on other staff, and lowers productivity and morale between co-workers.

To increase retention rates, HR departments should focus on hiring employees that are a good fit professionally and culturally. Although recruiters might meet their organization’s goals for quickly hiring employees within a set budget, bringing on low-cost employees who aren’t the right fit contributes to high turnover rates. One strategy for accomplishing this is to include peer interviews within the hiring process. This way an applicant can meet their potential co-workers, and the current staff can gauge whether the person would be a cultural fit.

Employee retention isn’t just about making good hiring decisions, but ensuring current employees have the resources they need to do their job well and stay engaged. Regular workshops in which staff and management can share best practices, personal goals, and success stories is a great way to create a dialogue that will help staff to grow professionally and build a sense of community in their mission as a team. Likewise, employees who under-perform should work with management to set clear goals for moving forward. If timely improvement doesn’t seem possible, it may be a good idea to let that employee go in order to ensure they aren’t placing additional strain on their co-workers and the organization.

6 Tips to Keep Your Office Productive and Happy

The times are such that working hours are long and employees spend most of the day at the office. Consequently, people are getting burnt out because sometimes there isn’t time for breaks. However, this is avoidable.

If working conditions are changed for the better, the employees will actually enjoy being in the workplace. Some global brands have recognised this, like Google. And many start-ups are following suit and setting examples for others.

  • Flexible working hours

Many companies today offer flexible working hours. People can start work in the timeframe between 8 and 10 a.m., and complete an eight-hour shift. This is a great solution for those who are not morning persons and need some time to get active.

This way, the employee doesn’t waste work time trying to wake up and start the tasks. They can come in late, already fresh and ready to begin the work immediately.

  • Be transparent

Share your ideas, goals and results with your employees on a regular basis. This transparent behaviour will boost the morale and help your employees to feel welcome and needed. If they know what the long-term plans are, they’ll be motivated to achieve them. This way you will not only increase productivity, but create loyal employees who can become brand ambassadors.

  • Remind employees to take a break

The reason why your employees are exhausted is that they don’t take breaks. This is simply something they forget or think is unacceptable until the job is done. If you promote break time and remind them to stretch their legs, they will certainly do it.

One of the modern ways is to create a recreation room with games and nooks for break time. Also, you can invite a yoga coach to demonstrate some simple exercises or organise lunch delivery for all. Whatever your strategy, this will sure bring you extra points with your staff and create a positive company culture.

  • Encourage communication

E-mails, chats, message boards and project management applications keep the communication alive, but nothing is better than chatting over coffee. Exchanging actual words and ideas in person is always a better approach than impersonal online communication.

Organise meetings as much as possible and allow some casual conversation during those. Office chatter can be problematic for some because of the nature of their work. But the recreation room, hallways or terrace are perfect to go and talk to your employees.

  • Reward employees

Rewards are always a surefire way to motivate your employees. However, make sure that you carefully plan the matter and see it through. A reward system can easily create a competitive environment among the employees and that can be detrimental to the office morale.

The safest rewards are not monetary, but those that are fun. Invent your own system, like giving funny and inventive titles such as King of Programming or Hemingway pin for best content writer.

  • Create a comfortable working environment

Ergonomic chairs, lazy bags and couches are just some of the things that come to mind for a comfortable office. Some companies go as far as to create indoor Zen gardens or waterfalls to reduce the stress and provide a serene atmosphere.

However, firstly you should take care of the environment. Aircon services will help you create the perfect “climate” during all seasons and make sure your employees are comfortable. A well-equipped and supplied kitchen will take care of their coffee, tea and snack needs. And a water dispenser on every floor and within easy reach will certainly make sure that all basic needs are fulfilled.

In the end

“A happy employee is a productive employee”, goes the saying. So spare no time or money when it comes to creating a positive and creative atmosphere in your office space. It will sure make everyone happy and productive for future tasks to come.

The Secret to Improving the Employee Experience Has Nothing to Do With Quirky Benefits

The Secret to Improving the Employee Experience Has Nothing to Do With Quirky Benefits

The Secret to Improving the Employee Experience Has Nothing to Do With Quirky Benefits

We’re in the midst of a global productivity crisis. The IMF estimates that if productivity growth had followed its pre-2008 financial crisis trend, overall GDP in advanced economies would be about 5% higher than today. However, to blame everything on the financial crisis is misleading. The overall trend in productivity growth is stagnant and has been on a downward trend for the last several years, costing the US a staggering $450-$550 billion a year. These national figures raise concern for business leaders as they battle to achieve growth in an unstable political and economic climate, looking for ways to ensure that their entire business is working as efficiently as possible, from the top to the bottom.

You’d think this would be simple but recent research conducted amongst 2,000 Americans for the report ‘Why your workforce isn’t working’, found that only 37% of respondents think they’re highly productive in their role. There is clearly much room for improvement.

Positive experiences beget productivity

 According to the research, 78% of people say they are more productive at work when their working experiences are positive. This jumps to 92% for younger people or millennials – a generation that will make up 50% of the workforce by 2020. Employers need to stop and listen to them. Clearly, driving positive workplace experiences is important but what does that actually mean?

The workforce experience can be viewed very similarly to the customer experience. It’s the journey an individual employee makes throughout their contact with a particular organization, from initial recruitment discussions, through to being a fully-fledged worker and also their exit should they leave. It’s a fast-moving and evolving journey, with no-one person’s journey being the same as another. It’s vital that organizations can be agile and flexible to these needs, so that they improve the experience and ultimately drive productivity. But how do you go about it?

Quirky benefits don’t yield expected results

 First and foremost, employers need to build a stronger connection with employees. The research suggests that at present there is a large disconnect between the two, particularly about what positive workforce experiences look like. Forty per cent of business owners believe free food, beer fridges, ping-pong tables and bean bags are important to employees. Perhaps understandably given the publicity that high-profile and successful brands like Google, Facebook and Apple get for such ‘quirky’ benefits. But when asked, employees across all age groups said benefits such as ping pong tables (5%) or company outings (9%) add relatively little value to their workforce experience. This disinterest for quirky benefits is even true in cities where ping-pong tables have become commonplace, like San Francisco where only 4.2% of respondents rated it as a valuable addition to their day-to-day workplace experience. In fact, more than half of respondents (53%) felt that having games in the office are distracting and actually decrease productivity.

Are you asking the right questions?

 Instead of making assumptions, employers should be asking their employees directly what would improve their experience and help them be more productive. As it stands, more than half of people have never been asked this by their employer, with just 12% being asked on a regular basis.  Just as there is business value in listening to customers, there is just as much value in listening to employees. And don’t assume that HR’s trusted tool, the annual survey is doing the job. Twenty percent of those we spoke to said it wasn’t a benefit to them or a suitable catalyst for business transformation.

Invest deeply in flexibility and appreciation

 Once employers take the time to engage with their employees, they are likely to find clear recommendations on how to improve productivity. The research found that two key requirements stood out. Unsurprisingly, the first being flexible and remote working, with 81% stating this is very important and highly valued; particularly when it comes to balancing the varying demands of their professional and private lives. The second, being valued and recognized in their role. Two-thirds (66%) of people cited this as the most important aspect of their day to day employment – not pay rises or better benefits which bear a cost, but being valued and having recognition is what’s a high value, cost-free option for companies.

As major economic shifts continue to happen, it’s never been more important focus on productivity. While economic leaders and governments can consider the value of national fiscal measures, individual businesses can play their role too. And fortunately, as this research shows, it doesn’t have to be difficult. The key to success, as in many aspects of business, is to get to know the people you’re trying to target better and to build personalized positive experiences around them. And much like when building a successful customer experience, data and technology plays a clear role when it comes to getting your workforce working.

Artificial Intelligence trends become today’s HR realities

Gartner Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2017

The emergence of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies in the past years has profoundly impacted a tremendous number of companies and sectors. Take the example of supply chain functions – these have been completely reshaped and fully robotized warehouses are now the new standard. In parallel, other support or corporate functions have also caught this technological wave, but not with the same speed and pace. Human Resources today are the perfect illustration: the shift towards Digital HR has started for pioneer organizations, but the majority of companies are still in the reflection and conceptualization stages. On one hand, there is an overwhelming feeling related to the immensity of ‘the possible’ in terms of HR technology offerings, and on the other hand, there is a need to answer growing expectations from an evolving workforce.

Today, HR C-levels are facing a common main equation: Ensuring that HR roadmaps will become even more relevant in the C-suite and help streamlining organizations while improving the employee’s experience.

But how are AI technologies concretely impacting the HR community?

Beyond the reflection and conceptualization stages mentioned earlier, AI is clearly acknowledged as a critical component of the future HR service delivery model. Most of discussions today are about how to incorporate chatbots, robots or other cognitive solutions within Human Resources departments.

Just to name a few examples:

  • Robotic process automation (RPA) is a new norm today. Any process optimization exercise almost always considers robotic automation as a solution. In this context, almost all HR processes are subject to automation. The main recurring ones that we observe are related to recruitment, core HR administration, compensation, payroll and performance, but all HR processes that require significant manual input are candidates for automation.
  • Chatbots are also getting a lot of traction. For example, in the HR space, chatbots are replacing traditional FAQs. Cognitive chatbots can also be trained by humans in order to improve their correct answer rate. This is a real game changer and robust accelerator to change the employee experience.
  • Robots are less and less considered as exhibition gadgets and can now be found in some HR front office departments.
  • Voice assistants on mobile for any employee, anytime, anywhere are becoming more common – say hello to the new HR ‘Siri’. A vacation request for example can then be part of a quick phone conversation, instead of several less efficient transactions involving HR systems and emails.

What we are observing, is that AI technologies are becoming fully embedded within the HR community. The initial doubts and fears have been overcome by most HR professionals and AI is recognized as a real added value to the employee. The HR operating model shift is ongoing and we are only at the early stages as the technological change is evolving at an exponential speed. Tomorrow new Artificial Intelligence offerings will emerge and will continue to reshape HR departments.

Author: Thomas Dorynek – Manager, People Advisory Services, EY

Thomas is a seasoned consultant with extensive experience in HR Digital Transformation projects. Views are his ownFollow @tdorynek

Some vector hands and objects for free design. An image from stockio.com

The HR GDPR Divide: SD Worx survey reveals GDPR has polarised HR

Today SD Worx, the global HR and payroll service provider, revealed that out of 1,800 HR and payroll professionals, 44% do not know what the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is. However, of the 56% that are aware of the impending GDPR, 81% feel they will be ready by the May 2018 deadline.

The findings, conducted among nine European markets, show surprisingly polarised views when it comes to the new legislation.

Of the 56% of HR and payroll professionals that are aware of GDPR, the majority are collaborating with other departments or outsourcing providers. 84% of respondents revealed that they are getting help from other departments in the organisation, yet 73% believe that GDPR compliance would be easier if HR and payroll was outsourced. In addition, the survey found that 91% are likely to look for additional skills outside the organisation to help with GDPR preparation.

Of those that are aware of GDPR, 55% of respondents believe GDPR is a risk to the HR industry, leading them to implement various preparations. 68% of respondents are absorbing as much as possible on the subject and reviewing and updating all existing policies and processes related to data protection, and 49% are assessing the need for changes to current business relationships (including with data contractors).

Jean-Luc Barbier, International Managing Director at SD Worx, commented, “This survey has revealed the clear divide in the HR industry. Even though those who have heard of GDPR are preparing for GDPR and think they are likely to be ready by the deadline, the other half of the industry has not heard of GDPR. Therefore, you would assume that the ones who aren’t aware aren’t making the necessary changes to their department. It’s great to see that those who are aware are seeking skills to help them from a variety of sources, both internal and external. What this survey tells us though is that a significant amount of education still needs to be done.”

When it comes to GDPR-readiness in the nine markets, the survey also highlighted various differences between countries. For example, only 67% of respondents in Austria believe their HR team will be fully GDPR compliant by the deadline, whereas in Ireland the rate was 90%. In addition, when asked if outsourcing for the HR and payroll department will make becoming GDPR compliant easier, 56% of Swiss respondents said yes, whereas Belgium (85%) and the United Kingdom (73%) were much higher.

Although the HR industry seems to be polarised, for those who have heard of GDPR, the benefits are recognised. When asked what the key benefit of GDPR is in the HR and payroll industry, 71% believe improved data security will be the biggest benefit, whereas only 3% believe that GDPR will bring no benefits at all.

Q & A with David Green | The HR Tech Weekly®

People Analytics Is Core to the Future of the HR Function: Q&A with David Green

People Analytics Is Core to the Future of the HR Function

Today our guest is David Green, a true globally respected and award winning writer, speaker, conference chair and executive consultant on people analytics, data-driven HR and the future of work.

David is the Global Director, People Analytics Solutions at IBM Watson Talent. He is also the longstanding Chair, of the Tucana People Analytics conference series, the next edition of which – the People Analytics Forum, takes place in London on 29-30 November.

David has spoken at conferences and/or worked with people analytics leaders in over 20 cities in the past year including San Francisco, Sydney, London, Paris, Singapore, New York, Amsterdam, Moscow and Berlin. This affords David with a unique perspective and insight into what’s working, what’s not, and what’s forthcoming in the field of people analytics.

The interview is hosted by Alexey Mitkin, Founder, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief, The HR Tech Weekly® Online Media Co.

1. Hi David, and first of all thank you very much for this interview with The HR Tech Weekly®. The year of 2017 is approaching its end. What made a difference this year in the field of people management and HR technologies?

Thanks Alexey, it is a pleasure to speak with you. For me, 2017 has been a pivotal year in the field as the realisation that people analytics is core to the future of the HR function has become far more widespread. In one of his recent articles (see here), Josh Bersin described people analytics “as the lynchpin of success for HR in the next few years”, and I have to say I completely agree – although that probably doesn’t surprise you!

We still have some way to go in terms of widespread adoption and just as importantly in embedding analytics and data-driven decision making within organisational culture, but the acceptance that this is core rather than peripheral is a welcome momentum shift.

Elsewhere, the move from many companies to develop programs and technologies that personalise the candidate/employee experience in areas such as talent acquisition, onboarding, learning and mobility is also positive. It’s about time that we have rich and personalised experiences at work similar to those we already enjoy as consumers. Data and analytics plays a foundational role in this.

2. People analytics is an area of profound interest to business leaders. What do you see as the main trends in the people analytics space?

You are right to highlight the heightened interest levels in people analytics Alexey. I’d summarise the main trends as follows:

  • More and more organisations getting started with people analytics – 2017 seems to have been the year that the talking about when to start analytics stopped and the actual hard work in creating capability began for many organisations. So, the number of organisations in the early stages of their people analytics journeys is on the increase and many will face similar challenges in terms of data quality, skills and capabilities, stakeholder management/education and project prioritisation. Our recent IBM Smarter Workforce Institute research on HR Analytics Readiness in Europe demonstrated though that most organisations still have a long way to go.
  • Developing an analytical culture: this is key for organisations that want to develop sustainable capability in people analytics. This means exciting, equipping and enabling HR Business Partners, and clearly demonstrating and communicating the impact of people analytics initiatives within the organisation. This is the focus of many companies that have built initial capability and success in people analytics.
  • Ethics and privacy concerns: this continues to be the most important and challenging aspect for practitioners. Research from Insight222 reveals that 81% of people analytics projects are jeopardised by ethical and privacy concerns. With the EU GDPR legislation coming into effect in May 2018 and the emergence of new employee data sources, focus on this area will continue to be high.
  • The consumerisation of HR – as per my earlier point, many organisations that have developed people analytics capability are looking at ways to understand and improve the employee experience. In addition to the personalised machine-learning based technologies referenced earlier, this includes efforts to understand and analyse employee sentiment. You can’t do either of these things without analytics so those organisations that have already developed people analytics capability are in pole position to take advantage here.
  • Organisational network analysis (ONA) – interest in ONA has exploded in 2017 as organisations seek to better understand team effectiveness and productivity. Practitioners interested in this burgeoning area of people analytics should check out the work of Rob Cross, recent articles by Josh Bersin and vendors like TrustSphere, Humanyze and Worklytics. Expect interest in this area to continue to soar in 2018.

3. On the eve of People Analytics Forum 2017 could you slightly open the curtain on what makes an ideal agenda in modern HR analytics, workforce planning and employees insights then?

I always enjoy chairing the Tucana People Analytics World and People Analytics Forum events as the agenda is always cognisant of the fact that the diversity of delegates in terms of where they are with analytics varies widely. As such, the three tracks: Start (for those getting started), Grow (for those building capability and looking for deeper insight) and Advance (for advanced practitioners and those exploring new data sources) means there is something for everyone. This is hugely important as in my experience the people analytics community is highly collaborative and there is a mutual desire amongst practitioners for shared learning. The Tucana events provide this in spades.

4. It was heard that some attendees of conferences recently formed a viewpoint that the slow adoption of analytics has been because of a lack of practical cases delivered by speakers. Your point of view on the problem will be of great influence.

I haven’t really heard this viewpoint from many. I would argue the contrary in fact that most of the conferences I attend feature numerous and diverse case studies from practitioners. I think you need a balance of speakers from the practitioner, consultant, vendor and analyst communities as each provides a slightly different perspective – indeed much of the innovation in the space is coming from the vendor community. As such, at the conferences I chair, speak and attaned there is normally much to inspire delegates whatever their maturity level when it comes to people analytics. Of course, there is a distinction between being inspired and immitation as each organisation faces different business challenges and has unique cultures. If I could offer one piece of advice to practitioners, whatever their maturity level, it is to channel their efforts on the key business challenges that have the biggest impact within their organisations.

5. What new data-driven HR solutions are on your watchlist and why?

As I mentioned before much of the innovation in the people analytics space is coming from the vendor community and I always recommend to practitioners to keep abreast of the latest developments here. Data-driven companies to look at include: TrustSphere, Alderbrooke Group, Aspirant, Glint, Visier, Crunchr, Workometry, Peakon, OrgVue, Headstart, Worklytics, Humanyze, Qlearsite, One Model, hiQ Labs, Cultivate and StarLinks; and those are just the ones I can remember off the top of my head!

If you’ll forvive the self-promotion, I would like to add that IBM is also doing some groundbreaking work in this space through bringing Watson to HR, particularly in the talent acquisition and the employee experience areas – see more here.

6. What advice would you give to HR professionals looking to boost their careers within the people analytics space?

Well, firstly you should get yourself along to the People Analytics Forum and read my articles on LinkedIn!

Seriously, analytics is a core capability for the future HR practitioner and it won’t be long before the likes of CIPD and SHRM build this into their educational programs. Until then, find some courses (like the Wharton School course on Coursera), attend some conferences, read some books (like The Power of People and the Basic Principles of People Analytics), and seek to learn from analytics professionals both in and outside of HR.

For me, HR is one of the most exciting places in business to work in at the moment and the increased use of analytics and data-driven decision making is one of the reasons why I believe this to be the case.

Avoid Making A Bad Hiring Decision With The Assistance Of Technology

rawpixel-com-323215 (1)A bad hiring decision can put a strain on a company financially with bad decisions, according to CV-Library, costing UK businesses losses of up to £15,000 (per hire). Due to the time and resources being invested into various different stages of the recruiting process. Unfortunately, these mistakes are at times inevitable and companies often feel the pinch of taking on board a bad hire. However, there are possible technological solutions that recruiters and hiring managers can adopt in order to reduce this risk and in the future make more effective hiring decisions.

Candidate screening

At times as many as 75% of applicants are underqualified for a given job role. Without the usage of hiring technology, it can result in recruiters spending a high proportion of their time sorting through applications and disregarding those unspecific to the position. If this is not done correctly, human error can ultimately affect the quality of hire and increases the chances of recruiting a ‘bad hire’.

Automated candidate screening reduces the reliance on a recruiter having to manually narrow down applications and instead this initial decision-making stage is managed with the addition of hiring technology. This type of automation works by filtering through CVs/resumes to determine the best fit for a specific role. Which can be dependent on different factors such as, experience, skills and qualifications. The applications are then narrowed down and the recruiter or hiring manager is presented with the most appropriate candidates to whom match the job requirements. By depending less on human evaluation to reduce high volumes of job applications, the risk of letting qualified candidates slip through the recruitment process is reduced. Saving the hiring professional valuable time to which they can reinvest back into other aspects of their profession.

Reconsider existing talent

High-quality candidates can often get overlooked, particularly those already existing within a talent database. These job seekers may have been unsuccessful for a previous role but their details are still stored and ‘kept on file’ but then are not made use of for future roles. Job-seekers have become tired of hearing this phrase after failing to land a job. However, this term can be taken to a new literal sense, with the addition of hiring technology.

New opportunities can be open up for existing candidates who failed to secure a previous role, enabling the recruiter to reconnect with the job seekers and find hidden talent already existing within their database. Which saves time and can find candidates who are already qualified for the role. This in turn, can improve the quality of hire, as these candidates may have a previously applied for a similar role and therefore already have the desired skill set and experience for the specific role.

Unconscious bias

In recruitment, there is always a risk of hiring decisions being made with influence from an unconscious bias. This is due to a perceived perception and notion regarding a candidate’s characteristics that may affect their job chances. Creating an unfair advantage or disadvantage to those applying for a role. Recruiting an individual with a biased thought process is likely to cloud the recruiter’s decision and their skills and experience may become secondary. This can easily result in a bad hiring decision, if their ability to do the job is not prioritised.

CiiVSOFT creates recruitment automation tools for talent acquisition, to help save costs and streamline hiring. Find out more here.

Affordable Care Act Reporting Software

The Biggest Challenges of Affordable Care Act Reporting

Written by Adam Miller, HR Compliance Manager, Passport Software, Inc.

Affordable Care Act

I’ve helped hundreds of Applicable Large Employers (ALEs) manage their Affordable Care Act requirements and file their 1094-C/1095-Cs. Though each had different reporting needs, the same question kept coming up…

How do I complete Part 2?

1095-C Part II
The original source: https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f1095c.pdf

Lines 14, 15, and 16 make up Part 2 of the 1095-C and provide details of an employer’s offer of coverage to a full-time employee. Knowing how to correctly complete this section is imperative for Affordable Care Act compliance and avoiding penalties.

Line 14—Use code 1E.

Choosing a line 14 code requires you to know three things:

  • Was coverage offered?
  • Did it meet minimum standards?
  • Was it available to the spouse and dependents?

Deciding on the best 1A-1K code to complete line 14 has one extra nuance, and it can save you hours of scrutiny: If a full-time employee is offered coverage and has the unconditional option to add their spouse and dependents to their plan, you may use the corresponding 1E code for all employees offered coverage—even those who are not married or do not have children. Since spouse or dependent coverage doesn’t need to meet any cost standards, there is little reason not to offer it.

With this allowance, most fully ACAcompliant companies will find they can use Line 14 code 1E for every 1095-C they submit, instead of 1B for single employees, 1C for single parents, and 1D for childless couples. Your life is already easier, isn’t it?

Line 15—Forget about Line 14.

This continues to be a very tough concept to nail down. The IRS wants to know: What is the monthly employee’s share of the least expensive, employee-only plan available to this person?

Let’s review each part of that statement.

  • Employee’s share—the employee’s remaining portion after the employer’s contribution.
  • Least expensive—the qualifying plan with the lowest monthly cost available, often referred to as bronze level. This is not what the employee is paying for a more comprehensive plan.
  • Employee only—One Person. Forget that on Line 14 you reported that the offer included the spouse/dependents. For the purposes of ACA reporting, it does not matter which plan an employee actually enrolls in, only what they could have chosen and what it would have cost them.

Line 16—What happened after Line 14?

It isn’t difficult to find that code 2C applies to employees who accept an offer of coverage, or that 2B is used for a part-time employee. Things start to get murky with code 2D. Code 2D refers to the variable-hour[i] employee who is in their Initial Measurement Period, also known as the Look-Back Method.

People start to panic when it comes to employees who were offered insurance but declined. In their 1095-C Instructions, the IRS wrote 1181 words describing all the Series 2 Codes in use. Nowhere does it say “Use code __ if the employee declined coverage.” In cases where you have made an a fully qualified offer which an employee has turned down, use whichever of 2F/2G/2H matches your method for calculating their income and ensuring affordability:

  • Use 2F if you look at W-2 Wages
  • Use 2G if you use the Federal Poverty Level
  • Use 2F if you look at the employee’s Rate of Pay

Congratulations…

Not only have you completed Part 2, but unless your company self-insures, you can bypass Part 3 completely!

What’s the next step?

Knowing how to correctly use the codes and contribution fields is fundamental, but organized tracking of ACA-related information throughout the year is equally important to save time and avoid penalties. A good, regularly maintained spreadsheet is a serviceable option for smaller ALEs with straightforward ACA reporting. For larger employers, or more complicated reporting, a specially designed software solution or service will reduce the compliance workload and help avoid penalties. A good one will help you accurately manage changing and editing data and even create the 1094-C/1095-C forms or electronic files.

Passport Software’s ACA Software and Services range from on-premise software to full year-round compliance management services. Our friendly service is fast and accurate, and our customers have given us great reviews. Our software is IRS-certified and we are IRS-approved to file on behalf of our clients.

Dealing with past years reporting troubles? We can help there, too.

Learn more about Passport Software’s ACA Software and Services, or call us at 800-969-7900.

[i] variable-hour refers to cases where it is unclear whether the employee will be comfortably above or below the 130 hour per month full-time threshold.

Form 1095-C
The original source: https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f1095c.pdf

About the Author:

Adam Miller

Adam Miller is the HR Compliance Manager at Passport Software, Inc. He designed their ACA Software and, as a support tech, he has helped hundreds of people with Affordable Care Act compliance and reporting.  Adam has a background in engineering, the service industry, and print, which makes him a technically proficient and friendly communicator for Passport Software.

Passport Software, Inc.

181 North Waukegan Rd, #200

Northfield, IL 60093

800-969-7900

If you want to share this article the reference to Adam Miller and The HR Tech Weekly® is obligatory.