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Employee Engagement and Experience Driven by “Culture First”

This is no more a secret that engaged employees are more likely to perform better and improve organizational success. And as the companies move more towards agile organizational models, there will be more increase in the employee engagement rates.

Employee Engagement refers to an employee’s job satisfaction, loyalty, and inclination to spend discretionary effort toward organizational goals. Companies measure engagement through an annual employee survey or by a continuous feedback culture.

The important characteristic to remember when thinking about employee engagement is that, it is a real-time assessment of how employees are feeling about their organization and their work.

Culture First

But this is not the only important one. We need to care about culture as well, for understanding what is happening within our organization. And engagement is a critical output of a strong culture.

For organizational culture, the definition centers on the concepts of values and assumptions which contribute to the development of norms, behaviors, and other cultural activities. Because employee engagement and organization’ culture both involve an individual’s relationship with their workplace, it is necessary to bring them always together.

But why the organizational culture is important here?

Check out the below INFOGRAPHICS on Organization Culture from Multigence. They are providing an efficient and scalable technology based solution that measures, evaluates and matches your organization culture with individual profiles of employees and candidates.

Organisation Culture in Infographics from Multigence

According to Multigence, organization must focus on fitting individuals into the corporate culture. Culture isn’t for your employees. It starts the moment a candidate first comes across your brand. And this immediate activate the drivers for your organization growth and success like below.

  • Right hiring and promotion
  • Proper alignments of skills, including the soft skills
  • Taking the right talent decisions
  • Fitting to the corporate branding

The culture of the organization is shaped by each single individual. Successful talent decisions will be driven by cultural fit.

And in the long term benefits, it also

  • Reduce in recruitment cost and higher success rate of recruiting with right hiring match
  • Increase in retention, employee satisfaction, performance indicators and productivity
  • Build and choose better leaders and find the right successors

According to Bersin by Deloitte, organizational culture, engagement, and employee brand proposition remain top priorities in 2017; employee experience ranks as a major trend again in 2017. “Employee engagement has become the top issue on the minds of business leaders, directing us to an entirely new model of management”. And companies need a new approach—one that builds on the foundation of culture and engagement to focus on the employee experience holistically, considering all the contributors to worker satisfaction, engagement, wellness, and alignment.

And according to them, the below figure shows the factors that contribute to positive employee experience. So it pretty clear that today organizations must focus on the employee engagement to have the right employee experience on the foundation of culture.

Simply Irresistible Organization Model

Back in 2015, Graham Massay, the Business Head of The House, came up with an interesting article Culture First Engagement Second. Where he mentioned the risk is that engagement becomes a once-a-year, box-ticking exercise, designed to prove that everything’s OK rather than actually making sure that everything’s OK. By contrast, a strong values-led culture keeps your organization healthy and your employees inspired.

Focusing on culture rather than employee engagement doesn’t mean giving up on measurement. Culture is an outcome. And the business cannot afford to focus solely on engagement at the expense of culture.

So the next question comes to our mind.

Why organizations should focus on employee engagement based on culture first approach?

Multigence has tried to bring the benefits of employee engagement driven by culture or based on a foundation of culture, with the below INFOGRAPHICS.

Employee Engagement Driven by Culture in the Infographics from Multigence

Now if the organization is looking to apply for these benefits, they must focus on employee experience and the world of digitalization. There are many digital tools available in the market which delivers great employee experience. These tools can be categorized as:

  • Productivity and Collaboration tools
  • Engagement and Feedback tools
  • Performance Management tools
  • Well-Being tools
  • Culture Fit tools
  • Employee Services tools

If one can commit to managing these aspects of your employee experience along with employee engagement and culture, then they can be surely a few steps ahead of their peers. The important thing is to consistently care about the employee experience and culture. The role of technology makes a great impact here and one should plan accordingly.

In beginning of this year there is also came up an article Culture First. Digitalization Second. (In German), by the writer Daniel Fuerg, an entrepreneur and according to him.

“It is about a cultural change in our society, triggered by the possibilities of digital technologies and innovations. But the change is not digitalization. The change is what the new possibilities with us humans make. It is a cultural change, which was triggered by technological changes. Companies must thus respond to cultural change and at the same time equip themselves with technology.”

So it’s clear that before we should plan and start considering about engagement, experiences, we must also consider culture the individual culture and off course the organization culture.

So it’s make sense to focus on “Culture First” approach over company first or even county first.

About the Author:

Soumyasanto Sen

Soumyasanto Sen — Professional Advisor, Consultant, Investor in HR Technologies having 12+ years of experiences focusing on Strategies, People Analytics, Cloud, UX, Security, Processes, Integration and Entrepreneurship in Workforce Transformation.

Blogger, Speaker and Evangelist in HR Technologies. Founder of HRTech Conscience.


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4 Ways Managers Can Promote Self-Motivation Amongst Their Team

I Love My Job

We are in an age when employers are waking up to the fact that pay and bonuses, while necessary, are only the basics that are needed to retain your workforce. To really inspire motivation, it is widely agreed by psychologists and experts (not to mention popularized in numerous TEDTalks) that the best way is to give employees more autonomy and ownership over their work, provide opportunities to grow and develop and inspire them with purpose.

This creates a much more challenging task for management. Aside from creating the right conditions, how can managers help inspire their team towards self-motivation?

Set goals but also milestones

Ever since Edwin Locke first revealed his 1960s research into goal setting and motivation, it has become clear that effective goal setting is a key to great leadership. Even with purpose, we all need something to work towards to boost our motivation and know we’re making progress. Aside from making your goals SMART, it’s important to recognize the value of setting milestones for each goal. Goals should be larger benchmarks which will take time (a month or quarter) to achieve. While having goals in place can boost motivation, sometimes your reports can become overwhelmed if the goal is too big. That’s where milestones come into play.

For each goal, encourage your reports to come up with the smaller milestones that will need to be completed to reach their goals. This can be as simple as:

Goal: Get 100 people to participate in our quarterly webinar

Milestones:

#1 Confirm speaker by …

#2 Create email list, invites and reminders by …

#3 Create banners for social media campaign by …

Breaking goals down into smaller steps will help your team members stay focused and give them direction if they become lost or overwhelmed. This will also facilitate the move towards greater autonomy.

Create regular learning opportunities

Constantly helping your employees develop is not only a priority for HR and managers, but also one of the main things top candidates are looking for in an employer. However, this doesn’t have to result in expensive external training.

Consider holding regular voluntary learning sessions during which you share tips and tricks on how you organize yourself, balance priorities, set goals, give feedback, or any advice you think could help your team optimize their work experience. Open it up for your team members to also share their own insights. Inviting inspirational speakers is great but, if you lack the budget or space, joining conferences and meetups or even sharing powerful TEDTalks can boost motivation and creativity amongst your workforce.

It’s ok to break the bad news, but provide a solution

While you should never avoid talking when things aren’t going well, you should always keep up the motivation to overcome these challenges by leveraging your team’s strengths. This shouldn’t be a generic “I believe we can do anything” talk, it should be honest. How do you do this? It’s essential that managers know the strengths of each of their teammates and are able to strategize about how each of these strengths can be put to use to overcome challenges as a team.

For example, if you’re not set to bring in your target number of leads by the end of the month, propose a new campaign that could utilize your PR team’s strength in event planning and your sales lead’s great oratory skills. Bonus points: Research by Gallup shows that recognizing your employee’s strengths boosts engagement and thereby also productivity, profitability and quality of work.

Allow employees to create their own purpose

Finding purpose in one’s work is one of the biggest drivers of motivation. If you really believe in what you’re doing and the impact it could have on society, you’re going to have the motivation to go the extra mile. Deloitte’s 2017 report on millennials emphasized a strong connection between employee loyalty and purpose and asserted that, “It is well documented that businesses with a genuine sense of purpose tend to demonstrate stronger long-term growth, and employees can usefully tap into this.”

For example, after experiencing a lack of development advice while working in the corporate sector, my manager, and one of the co-founders of our company, was motivated to create a solution that would enable managers and peers to provide more frequent and real-time performance feedback. Meanwhile, I joined the company with an interest in how our tool could be used to create more equitable workplaces.

Rather than encouraging me to focus only on the original purpose of our solution, my manager has encouraged my interest in this aspect of our product by supporting my proposals for research and projects on this topic. While both of us are motivated by the same purpose: providing greater access to performance feedback and growth, we are able to find motivation from different angles of the same purpose. Remember that a major benefit of diversity is the ability to see your solution from different angles. Taking each team member’s perspective into account and letting it take off has enriched our purpose and product.


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The Inconvenient Truth of Hidden Conflict in the C-suite – And What to Do About It

Written by Hesham El Komy, Senior Director, International Channels at Epicor Software. Specially for The HR Tech Weekly®.

The Inconvenient Truth of Hidden Conflict in the C-suite

A little bit of conflict between members of the C-suite is inevitable. When each member has different priorities and business objectives to the rest of the C-suite, it’s possible for this conflict to cause problems. Part of the tension is caused by a lack of consensus on business growth. According to recent research by Epicor, this misalignment of goals could lead to business problems if left unchecked. But if differing viewpoints are channelled positively, using technology and data to inform decision-making, suddenly ideas can foster growth and innovation rather than continue to be a source of conflict.

Hesham El Komy, Senior Director, International Channels at Epicor Software
Hesham El Komy, Senior Director, International Channels at Epicor Software

So what else could be contributing to conflict within the C-suite? One theory is that the CEO occupies a lonely position compared to the rest of the C-suite and has very little insight into the inner-workings of the internal departments within the business. CEOs tend to be more concerned with their “outward selves” – answering to stakeholders and explaining numbers to the board of directors.

Rob Morris, managing director and general manager of intellectual property at leadership consultancy firm YSC believes CEOs may feel the burden of growth more than other members of the C-suite. He refers to the CEO operating “like an island, despite the stereotypical image of a CEO projecting confidence and stability”. A recent study in Harvard Business Review examined how the burden of being responsible for tough business decisions can make a difference. It found that “93% of CEOs require more preparation for the role than they typically get” and are typically unready for the “loneliness and accountability that lies ahead”.

A variety of new technology roles could also be aggravating the tension within the C-suite. As a Wall Street Journal article reports, CIOs and CTOs are struggling to “differentiate their responsibilities”. The article goes on to say, “With so many roles, even other C-levels may not know where to turn to address a particular IT-related issue or problem. And the overlaps and conflicts may well lead to infighting”.

But while it is normal to have differing opinions and views – it is when these conflicts turn unhealthy and start becoming a strain on maintaining strong and healthy business operations that it becomes a problem. As Morris says, “conflict in a healthy team climate can lead to more effectiveness, but when the conflict remains hidden, confined to disagreements between only one or two key stakeholders, it can quickly become dysfunctional”.

So how can disagreements be turned into opportunities for innovation? Ideas and opinions can be shut down if they lack enough clear data to back them up. Having access to real-time information and insight can solve this. This means that key business discussions can be based on detailed metrics rather than simple “hunches” or gut-feelings. Senior business executives can then propose new ideas based on facts in front of them changing the conversation from perceived issues and problems to actionable steps designed to promote business growth.

As the Epicor research reveals, it is natural to have different ideas from other members in the senior team. But it is equally important to be aware that the battles should not be based on biased agendas that can only hinder business growth.

Some CEOs have already noted the positive impact the use of data can bring to ease the burden of managing business growth. The research, which questioned over 1,800 business leaders, revealed that 40% of CEOs agreed that access to information is of very significant importance to them, compared to 34% of CFOs, COOs and CIOs on average. Furthermore, 35% of CEOs agreed that having the right technology has made growth possible. Interestingly, one-in-ten blamed a lack of technology in hindering business growth.

“It’s essential to be able to interpret the data you have, and make good strategic judgements based on that data. But alignment of goals and information is key if the use of data is to be effective. Like rowers in a boat, C-suite members need to work together, if they are to make conflict a force for healthy business growth,” says Morris.

Still, whilst there are many benefits to using data to inform decision-making, challenges remain. A report has found that it’s possible for C-suite members to suffer from an “information overload” when the data cannot be used effectively, because there’s just too much of it and they lack the technology to make sense of it all. C-suite members must foster a culture of “collaboration and transparency”; using relevant information to build trust and tackle business challenges together.

The emergence of technology and the differing opinions within the C-suite are bound to crank up the tension amongst executives. But a failure to see the wider repercussions on the business can be disastrous. That does not mean differing opinions must be stunted. A healthy conflict based on data and facts can turn a tense situation into a positive experience for the business.

The journey from conflict to healthy debates must start with the provision of accurate and relevant data. So how do businesses achieve this?

If it’s important that C-level executives are exposed to the same information, in real time, the provision of up-to-date data via intelligent software becomes invaluable. The latest enterprise resource management systems (ERP), for example, can be accessed anywhere. So, whether it’s the CEO at a stakeholder meeting, or a COO discussing plans with teams, it is possible for them to base their business decisions on the same information. Once they are aligned in this way, they can discuss business priorities and concerns more effectively, changing the conversations in the boardroom and positively impacting the whole business.


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Great Companies Are Built Around Great People

Written by Annie Jordan, VP, Global Head of HR at Finstar Financial Group. Specially for The HR Tech Weekly®.

Annie Jordan, VP, Global Head of HR at Finstar Financial Group

There is a lot of truth in the saying that great companies are built upon great people. However, the reality is, of course, more complicated than that. The world’s leading companies are a powerful blend of people, vision, capability and culture. These things work together like the mechanics of a rocket, generating and maintaining irresistible momentum.

But how do you ignite the rocket?

It starts with the fuel, exceptional people. Without exceptional people, you will struggle to build departments that smash through goals or spark entrepreneurial commitment.

Yet how is it possible to attract top people to an environment that has not already been built into the kind of engaging, highly professional workplace that world class candidates come from and demand?

This chicken and egg scenario ranks as one of the most difficult strategic challenges in HR, and it is especially pertinent to the fast-moving world of HR in the tech industry, where workplace expectations are always growing.

The first thing to understand is that top performers do not avoid challenges. In fact, they seek them, and being open about the challenges that await them is something that will help attract the very best.

Finstar Financial Group is a private equity firm focused on the future of financial services, founded by Oleg Boyko. We believe in our businesses and that we are building the foundational elements of a modern, digitally adept, high-speed world. We have lofty ambitions, and we make these ambitions clear to the people we hope to attract. In fact, our ambitions do not end with revenue and profit targets: they are driven by a vision for the future of financial services.

We aim high when targeting the people we want to join our team, casting our net worldwide in our search for the best possible candidates. This sense of purpose and ambition has allowed us to attract first-rate minds from top tier companies.

We have now built a virtuous circle: by attracting top managerial talent, then constantly challenging them – insisting on the highest standards when doing so – and freeing them to achieve their goals in their own way, we have stoked their entrepreneurial spirit, and they tend to energetically and rigorously attack their targets. This has created a positive, exciting and goal–focused environment for all employees. It also, of course, makes Finstar Financial Group and its portfolio companies evermore attractive places to work, helping us draw in more great talent from around the world. 

“The greatest adrenaline hit for any Marketeer is to make a difference through their contribution. Bringing together knowledge from a past life’s conquest to unifying and motivating the wonderful and enthusiastic minds of a new organization is all part and parcel of that contribution. However, the contribution itself has to have a focus from which it draws its energy. In this case, we look to the Brand in question Finstar. A global titan within its own right, but with the prowess and agility of any new start up. With the help, assistance and guidance from the HR team you begin to understand the organization better, its ambitions and the almost blank canvass with which to mark out your approach. Most well-seasoned individuals and newcomers alike begin scanning the paperwork to find out where they sign! Though only at the initial stage of my journey with the organisation, I foresee it being a long and fruitful one, as well as becoming a key contributor to the well-oiled machine that is Finstar.” – Arun Varma, Chief Marketing Officer.

“I found a unique multi-cultural combination of talents in Finstar Financial Group. The company offers you a challenge of combining the skills and disciplines learned in large international corporations with the high flexibility and agility needed to adapt to rapidly changing technologies and customer expectations, so as to keep our competitive edge.” – Gauthier Van Weddingen, VP, Deputy CEO Operations.

“Creativity and ingenuity in all the aspects aligned with robust and conservative corporate standards and best practices, the possibility to combine the non-combinable while exploring the most elegant and very often, unique recipes in this “fusion cuisine” of innovative IT developments, financial retail services and business effectiveness, all these multiplied by the global scale and multicultural nature of our company – this impresses indeed. The kaleidoscope of different jurisdictions, approaches and mentalities, the possibility to work with extremely qualified professionals from all over the world create the unique experience and knowledge base, together with a desire to use it for the company’s growth and to confirm again and again that we all are real FinSTARs!” – Dmitry Kobzar, Head of Legal Department DFI.

Ultimately, this process of embracing lofty goals, setting our talented hires exacting challenges and stoking their entrepreneurial instincts has allowed Finstar to solve the HR conundrum of attracting the type of executives who create the attractive working environment which such exceptional people are attracted to. We now have a virtuous circle in place that has sparked the stellar growth that sets Finstar Financial Group apart as a high-flyer in the FinTech world, delivers value to our stakeholders, and makes each of our offices a cutting edge, innovative and challenging place to work.


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What you need to know about Agile Performance Management

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Agile performance management is a collaborative, continuous feedback and development practice that is steadily replacing traditional performance management.

Traditional performance management has proven to be insufficient to assess and enhance an employee’s contribution. Its primary focus is setting up a series of processes to measure the employee’s performance over the whole year. These processes end up having an unanticipated effect of managers focusing on employee’s weaknesses.

It is difficult to distinguish performance, except for the truly poor performers or high achievers. Being a year long process, below par or mediocre performers can’t be identified early on. Once a year performance review, with little to no feedback, gives no scope for development to the employees or the managers.

There needed to be a more dynamic performance management practice that could evolve and adapt according to the changing environment.

Elements of Traditional Performance Management:

  • Traditional performance management (TPM) reviewed employees annually or biannually. They were given a feedback for their overall performance of the year.
  • It set rigid goals for everyone for the entire year, that did not account for any changes. Employees were reviewed at the end of the year. They couldn’t fulfill these goals as unforeseen changes were not considered. This hampered their reviews to a high extent.
  • Spoon feeding was done on a large scale. Employees were believed to be inherently incapable of setting up their own goals.
  • Communication was a one way process. Employees felt their work is being dictated to them. Not only was this unproductive, but also created resentment at times.
  • Earlier, employees worked under tremendous pressure. Their performance review was largely dependent on their ability to deliver on time. Race to fulfill quantity often compromised on quality work.

Thus, Agile performance management was introduced. Its three key aspects are regular feedback, communication and coaching. These aspects bridge the gap between goal setting and performance evaluation.

Agile performance management focuses as much on the process as the end goals. Continuous improvement is the key.

Agile Performance Management [Infographic]

Let us look at a few ways to introduce agile performance management in your organisation:

Incorporate regular 360° feedback

In an age of instant communication, feedback should be given on an ongoing basis. A constructive feedback helps employees understand their strengths and weaknesses. Managers can help employees address the issues that hamper their productivity.

Similarly, employees can give regular feedback to their managers. It is the virtue of highly effective managers that they accept these feedback and improve themselves as well.

The stakeholders/customers too can share their expectations. A 360° feedback mechanism is highly beneficial for everyone involved.

Keep goals flexible

Employees are as different from each other as apples and oranges. Everyone works at a different pace. Individual goals should be assigned for individual development. These should be aligned with team goals for consistent growth and development. In case of any change in direction, they should be flexible enough to adapt to that change.

The expected outcome should be clear. Goals for the organisation as well as teams can be designed and modified accordingly. Goal setting frameworks such as either MBO (Management by Objectives) or OKR (Objectives & Key Results) are relied upon.

Collaborate more

Agile performance management lets employees find out their capabilities. Together they can determine a time frame in consensus for achieving their goals. This authority brings in a sense of accountability and boosts performance.

Focus on consistent development

Now, managers’ focus on consistently developing their employees through various means. It could be regular feedback, training or even recognition for their work. Developed employees are able to perform better and increase productivity.

Supportive Leadership to increase 2 way communication

Employees should be given an opportunity to voice their doubts. A 2 way communication ensures that the managers and employees are on the same page. There is a clear understanding of what is the purpose of their work and what is to be achieved. This ensures they do not deviate from the end goals and work hard to achieve them.

Agile performance management is changing the way organisations are looking at assessing & enhancing employee contributions. Not only build your softwares in an agile environment but also manage the employee performance with agility.

About the Author

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Yatin Pawar leads the Marketing and Content writing efforts at Amoeboids Technologies for UpRaise. Fascinated by all things Marketing, everyday he seeks to learn best practices and new concepts to help his company grow. A voracious reader, Yatin enjoys reading fiction, fantasy and mythological novels in leisure.

LinkedIn | Twitter | Medium


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Employee Onboarding – Engaging With New Talent in the First 90 Days

Your employees are your talent and your greatest assets. You need to make sure they are happy at every step! One of the most critical functions in this endeavor is employee onboarding. Employee onboarding does not end on day 1! In fact, real work towards onboarding an employee starts from here.

Getting your onboarding strategy right is extremely crucial. Taking care of the first day is important, but you also need to have a strategy laid out for the coming days. Shockingly, one of every 25 employees leaves on their very first day! And this trend is only getting worse with the rise of the millennials, since they are always open to new and better employment opportunities!

What are the steps that need to be taken in order to ensure that the new recruits make a successful transition to your organization?

Achieving this would require you to pay attention to how you are promoting your organization’s culture as well as how are you maintaining it to gain a competitive edge over similar players in the industry. The first 90 days are extremely important as they will decide whether you were able to create an active culture which gets the best out of your new hires or made the employees hate themselves for joining your organization because of your detached and poor onboarding techniques.

1. Start from Day 1

Your culture building process should start from day 1, where you find unique and exciting ways of making the employee feel special and warmly welcomed. A good idea for this could be to reduce the amount of paperwork which is generally a common formal procedure. Instead, make the first day full of interactions and devoid of any boring, mundane signature work. Instead, work on giving your employees an experience that they would want to share with their friends and family! This does not require you to plan extravagant sessions! Keep it simple and small. You can start with welcoming them with a gift box and ensuring that a team lunch is arranged so that they interact with their team mates.

2. Keep a constant check

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via GIPHY

You cannot abandon your employees once they are hired. Do not leave them all by themselves to do their tasks. Keep a check on how they are doing and be their buddy in helping and supporting them at every step. Everyone likes a little extra attention in the beginning and doing this would make them feel a part of the company. Being a good mentor will not only help you get the best out of the new employees, but can also give your business tremendous payoffs in the years to come.

3. Train on essential skills

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via GIPHY

Not all employees come to a new job with the required skills. In order to retain new hires, you will have to ensure that employees feel like they are growing in terms of the knowledge that they are gaining. Employers must educate new hires on how to best perform the tasks and responsibilities assigned to them. Assuming new employees know everything when they join could be one of the biggest mistakes you could make.

Onboard your new hires with Capabiliti’s Solution

4. Make an announcement

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via GIPHY

It might get really awkward for a new joinee to come to work unannounced as all the existing staff might treat him like an alien. In such a scenario, the exchange between existing employees and the new hires might get awkward as no one was informed. To do away with this, make sure you make a loud announcement in the best way possible to the entire office about who is going to join them and as what so that additional confusion can be done away with. Send in a mail prior to their joining date so that everyone is informed well in advance and also keep the desks to be occupied clean and ready.

5. Set clear goals

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via GIPHY

For the first 90 days, your strategy should be set. Define the route that new hires need to follow and what is it that is expected out of them in the first 90 days. Make sure you create a supportive environment which motivates the employees to achieve their best and give them whatever resources are required for them to do this successfully. If employees have a direction, they will feel like working towards achieving something and also see how well they fit in that professional set up. Their performance will also give you an indication of their skill sets and areas they need focus on.

6. Focus on real-time feedback

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via GIPHY

Ignoring an employee just because he is just a few weeks old in the company might affect employee’s motivation levels adversely. Their performance would require close monitoring and their managers will have feedback at every point. Make sure that feedback reaches them constantly so that they can keep a note of it themselves and strive to do better. Avoid accumulating everything for the performance review at the end of six months. Such a prolonged interaction might demotivate your employees and deflate their confidence levels.

Tired of running around for feedback? Sign up free on Capabiliti by Qustn, create a feedback questionnaire in minutes, and shoot it out to everyone in your organization now!

7. Engage with interactive conversations

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via GIPHY

Whenever there is any interaction, make sure there is a lot of questions and answers involved. You need to ask questions to new hires about their work and experience and also encourage them to ask you as many questions as they want. Be patient, kind and understanding while answering their queries and do not get bogged down by the level of support that might be on demand. Encourage an open environment where everybody’s voice could be heard.

8. Introduce key stakeholders

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via GIPHY

For any new employee, it is important that they are told about who the important people are and how they are placed in the formal hierarchy. It is always a good idea when the employee knows who is in what role and why some people are so important. Also spend some time explaining the main people and their fun characteristics. Be as humble as you can and tell them about stories that have shaped the company.

You need to go out of your way to in the first 90 days and commit to make the employees feel welcomed and valued. Managers should ensure that new recruits are commended and applauded for their little achievements every now and then. Managers should also meet with their new employees at regular intervals to make sure they discuss their career goals and what methods need a different outlook.

The values and vision of their company should be reminded of as and when possible so that goals are in alignment to them. The manager employee relationship needs to be at a human level and should not be a chance to exercise tyranny. The culture needs to open where there is a scope for constant communication and exchange of ideas. New employees also need to have avenues for relaxation and fun filled days on working days as well.

Take a look at this infographic on employee onboarding strategies at Facebook, Google and Apple

About the Author

Bhaswati BhattacharrayaBhaswati is a Product Specialist at Capabiliti, a mobile-first training and engagement solution for enterprises. Passionate about Economics, Bhaswati also loves storytelling. She has a keen interest in start-ups, food and travel. In her ‘me time’ she picks up fiction novels, tries different cuisines or explores routes to less traveled places on the world map. Follow her on Twitter at @Bhaswatibh


Source: Employee Onboarding – Engaging With New Talent in the First 90 Days

Three Findings from Deloitte’s “Global Human Capital Trends 2016 Report” for Recruiters

Deloitte’s Global Human Capital Trends 2016:

Over the past few years major disruptions have occurred in HR and corporate structures and organizations. Recently, Deloitte conducted a comprehensive global study of human capital trends and published those findings in a robust report titled: Global Human Capital Trends (GHCT) 2016–The New Organization: Different by Design. According to the researchers, “Sweeping global forces are reshaping the workplace, the workforce, and work itself.” The findings in this report are incredibly relevant and important for professional recruiters to be aware of and potentially take action on.

The data were compiled from more than 7,000 survey responses from corporate leaders in over 130 countries around the world. This blog post will present a few of the highlights from the report that will impact recruiting/hiring now and in the future.

The knowledge and wisdom gained from this study are two-fold for recruiting agencies, corporate recruiters, executive search firms, and/or legal search firms: (1) The study offers ideas for how recruiting agencies might want to run their businesses, and (2) The investigation provides many ‘nuggets’ of information into how your potential customers are running their organizations. If you have this knowledge it can only help you gain an advantage in the hyper-competitive world of professional recruiting. Part of running a successful business is truly understanding the ‘business challenges’ that your customers face on a daily basis.

The researchers begin by identifying 4 overarching changes that are affecting corporate structures: Demographic shifts (50-60% of workforce are millennials); Pressure for Increased Speed for Time to Market (rapid disruption of business models); Digital everywhere; and a Different Social Contract for Workers.

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The top 10 trends identified were: Organizational Design, Leadership, CultureEngagement, Learning, Design ThinkingChanging Skills of the HR OrganizationPeople Analytics, Digital HR, and Workforce Management.

Three of these trends (Organizational design, Culture, and Engagement) will be discussed. After summarizing the high points of the report on these three key trends I’ll point out ways these items will specifically impact recruiting and talent management.

Organizational Design & Structure

One key point of departure identified, in the study, was significant changes in organizational structure. The authors concur, “as companies strive to become more agile and customer-focused, organizations are shifting their structures from traditional, functional models toward interconnected, flexible teams.” Another way to think about the trend toward teams would be viewing them through the prism of a Hollywood movie production team and less like traditional corporate structures. Essentially, akin to a movie-set, people are coming together to tackle projects, then disbanding and moving on to new assignments once the project is complete.

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The implication for professional recruiters is re-thinking your organizational design in order to parlay the benefits of teams instead of the more traditional structure focused primarily on individuals doing specific tasks. In other words, professional recruiters would be encouraged to work together to connect talented people with amazing opportunities, instead of working ‘alone’ to achieve these goals (presumably working individually on a list of candidates and clients).

Here are a few suggestions that the GHCT study offers:

  • Looking at your organizations design: think about re-organization that includes “mission-driven” teams focused on customers, markets, or products. Perhaps it makes sense to assign a ‘team’ of recruiters/hiring managers to work on one specific job type or talent pool.
  • Critically analyzing your rewards and goals: think about your performance management around ‘team performance’ and ‘team leadership’ rather than focusing solely on individual performance. Moreover, reward people for project results, collaboration, and helping others. If a team is assigned to find talent for a specific client incentivize a team of 5 to get 25 placements done this quarter (instead of placing the task of each individual recruiter to get 5 placements on their own).
  • Implementing new team-based tools: put in place tools and measurement systems that encourage people to move between teams, and share information and collaborate with other teams. For recruiters this would mean structuring your firm in a way that encourages team members to work together to achieve company-wide goals for placements. Also, this would encourage communication and networking to ensure that the entire team/company is being successful.
  • Allowing teams to set their own goals: teams should be held accountable for results – but let them decide how to perform, socialize, and communicate these goals among the team. Instead of managers mandating what the goals are, allow the teams to collectively and creatively come up with ways to be held to account for their performance measurable’s.

Shaping Culture

Another vital trend in this study was the impact of culture on business strategy. The authors define culture as, “the way things work around here”. Also, culture is the system of values, beliefs, and behaviors that shape how real work gets done within an organization. As opposed to seeing culture as primarily an HR issue/problem, “CEOs and executive teams should take responsibility for an organization’s culture (with HR supporting that responsibility through measurement, process, and infrastructure).” Leaders should embody and actively engage in the kind of ‘culture’ they want their teams to reflect.

Interestingly, 28% of survey respondents believe they understand their culture well, while only 19% believe they have the ‘right culture.’ Change is so prevalent for organizations in 2016 that an effective culture can be the determining factor for if an entity can successfully weather the storms of change.

The implication for recruiters, in terms of culture, is ensuring that the executive leadership – in conjunction with HR – has thought deeply about the system of values, beliefs, and behaviors that shapes how placements are made within your recruiting agency. What are some ‘universal’ cultural values that your firm places a great deal of faith in? What types of qualities do you want your recruiters to look for as they place people? More specifically, GHCT encourages the following:

  • Prioritizing culture by CEO’s: Executives must clearly understand their company’s cultural values, determine how they connect to business strategy, and take responsibility for shaping them. Also, executives should routinely take their own inventory and analyze whether their own behaviors reinforce the desired culture.
  • Understanding both the current and desired culture: critical for leaders to examine current business practices to see how, and if, they align properly with desired culture. If there are practices that are counter-productive they should be thrown out and new ones implemented that edify the desired culture.
  • Measuring culture: Use empirical tools to understand employee attitudes and actions. HR should take the lead in this effort and get the results back to leaders for assessment (in a timely manner).

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Engagement – Always On

And finally, yet another trend identified in this study was employee engagement (which is closely tied to culture). Engagement is, “how people feel about the way things work around here.” The researchers also note that engagement is, “…a strong focus on listening to employees, workforce health and well-being, job redesign, and an enterprise-wide analysis of all dimensions of employee engagement.” Most companies still only evaluate engagement on an annual basis (64%), but in order to be truly effective managers and leaders should, “be proactive, implement the right tools, and give business leaders a continuous stream of data … and promote a culture of listening, and ensure that reward systems are consistent with engagement and retention goals.” True engagement means being ‘always on’ and continuously listening for what employees want and need from their jobs.

Engagement is also crucial because millennials are less loyal to organizations than ever before. Additionally, companies are tasked with a continued need to attract workers with technological and other specialized skills (as all companies digitize their businesses). And, finally, an organization’s employment brand is now open and transparent, so job candidates can easily see if a company is a great place to work (think of all of the “Best Place to Work” lists that are routinely populated on social media channels).

For professional recruiters the trend toward engagement can be meaningful in at least a couple of different ways. One, engaging all recruiters/hiring managers in effective ways can improve the culture/engagement/loyalty of team members. And, two, understanding the employee engagement of your customers (i.e., companies you are working to place candidates with) can aid in having successful placements where the candidate and the customer are both satisfied with the ‘marriage’. The researchers conclude:

  • inspirational201631Redefining engagement: By moving past the notion of turning your organization into a great place to work; also means “reaching down to the team and individual levels to foster highly engaged teams of employees doing work they love to do”.
  • Creating a sense of passion, purpose, and mission: Providing free perks can be nice, but companies that succeed in having highly engaged employees focus on driving meaning, purpose, and passion among their workers.
  • Linking compensation to engagement: Managers must get on board with tying team leaders’ compensation to their team members’ engagement. This sends a powerful signal and drives a sense of accountability about engagement efforts.
  • Doing “stay” interviews: In addition to having ‘exit’ interviews to find out why employees are leaving, also use ‘stay’ interviews to learn what it would take for an employee to stay at a company.

This article has outlined 3 of the 10 trends that the Global Human Capital Trends 2016 Report covers. More highlights to come regarding HR trends that will no doubt have long-lasting impacts on professional recruiters. Suffice to say, the landscape of work is changing rapidly and it is critical that professional recruiters are aware of the trends and adapt their businesses accordingly.

For more information on this study check out the Full Report.


Source: Three Findings from Deloitte’s “Global Human Capital Trends 2016 Report” for Recruiters – Crelate