Six Out-of-the-Box Employee Recruitment Methods (and Why You Should Innovate on Them)

Recruiting employees is similar to finding a mate or a life partner. Just because someone can fill that role does not mean they’re the best fit for you or that they’re able to bring something new to the table. Also, like dating, to find the best, you have to be the best. Now apply this to employees: what makes them the best?

It’s important to hire people who can not only perform a job well but who bring something new to the table. You want employees who go beyond the call of duty. In order to find innovative employees, you need to challenge them and know they’re up to it. Every step of the recruiting process as we know it allows and even calls for out-of-the-box thinking — we employers just never think to actually utilize our brains as we should!

There are already companies finding ways to innovate the recruiting process across the world — now it’s your turn. Think of the following these jumping-off points to create a strategy that will get you the most creative, intelligent, and hard-working applicants.

Weed Out the Bad Fits

Streamlining the applicant review process means narrowing your search, and technology does an excellent job of doing just that. Following the trend of, well, the augmented workforce, some employers are relying on AI recruiting systems. Because of this technology, resumes can be screened faster, and interview requests and rejection letters can be sent automatically with the click of a button.

Test Their Wits

Writing up a job description for potential applicants can be a chance to test your own creativity. Oftentimes it’s a mundane task. Something to keep in mind is that if you’re bored writing it, potential applicants may be bored reading it. Find a way to test their wits. Offer details and challenge them. Make it so anyone who applies comes in on their toes and is ready for anything you throw at them. This could be done in a number of ways: encouraging potential future employees to solve a work problem that could arise, hearing about their ideas for what a company needs, or asking how they might market a particularly niche product. The point is to hear how they may actually do the job in real life and get in their head a bit!

#SocialMedia

Do you work in a niche industry? Use social media to narrow down your search of people who possess the skills to excel in your niche. Utilize images and hashtags to attract the right kinds of applicants in addition to finding applicants you want to pursue! While some argue it has downsides regarding the way society communicates with each other, it’s also a way in which most people are connected to each other.

Pay Attention to Generation Y

If you use social media (see the last point), you will undoubtedly learn some new things about the kind of people in your field. Primarily, though, you’ll probably learn quite a bit about millennials (otherwise known as Generation Y, defined as being born roughly between 1977 and 1995). Right now, millennials are making a huge impact on business as we know it. Because of the things they value, social progress and ethics have been more often introduced into business decisions, advertising happens on social media, and more and more people are working remote. This generation is changing the game — so pay attention!

Try New People

It may be worth it to step outside of your comfort zone in what you look at in an applicant. Do they have odd, miscellaneous skills or work experience listed on their resume? Do they speak in ways that are unconventional within their cover letter? If they fit your requirements but seem like a weird match, try exploring that a little bit. You may find a drive and passion unmatched by your typical candidates.

Explore New Technological Channels

LinkedIn — the networking giant itself — posted an article last year about new ways to advertise your openness to applicants. They listed television ads, virtual reality, and using digital media as a whole to do this. The point is that you need to be where people converge and interact with technology. Rather than letting them come to you, go to them. You never know who or what you’ll find, and it may be the best decision you make!

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How have you jumped out of the box in searching for new applicants? Has it served you well? Feel free to let us know in the comments below!

 

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Customer Support and Millennials: What You Need to Know!

Written by Evan Oeflein | Originally published at AnswerDash 

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Millennials are the future! You’ve likely heard the phrase countless times and for good reason: if businesses learn to treat millennials well now, they can protect that relationship for years to come. Here’s what you need to know about millennials and customer service.

With recent counts hovering around 77 million, millennials make up about one-fourth of the US population and are a rapidly growing segment of the American economy1. Combined, they wield around $2.45 trillion in annual buying power2, which makes them a valuable market and an important customer base for any business. With their substantial importance now and eventual economic dominance, it’s crucial that businesses learn to meet their needs and preferences as much as possible. However, knowing what they want isn’t always easy — they are very different from Baby Boomers and Gen Xers. Knowing these differences is an effective competitive edge.

The key difference when interacting with millennials is primarily in how they expect to be treated and via which channels.

Millennials are extremely self-reliant, with almost 40% of them first checking a company’s FAQ page when they have a question3. If they can’t find an answer there or their needs go unmet, four out of five millennials choose to use social media for customer service instead of through web, phone, or online chat channels4. In fact, when contacting a company, most millennials use Facebook almost twice as often as the second-most used social media, Twitter4. An important side note: nearly 25% of millennials expect to get a response on social media within 10 minutes, which can be a difficult demand to meet for many businesses4. Failing to meet expectations like these can result in unhappy millennial customers and could hurt your business.

So what steps can you take to mitigate potential issues and cater to your millennial customers?

First things first: don’t make them call customer service. Make sure they can find answers on your website as easily as possible. Consider a self-service solution to help them help themselves, so they don’t need to reach out to you with problems or issues in the first place!

To drive this point home, here are a few things millennials would rather do than call a support line and sit on hold:

  • 34% would rather have their teeth cleaned4
  • 32% would rather go shopping on Christmas Eve4
  • 26% would rather go to the DMV4

Second: Bend over backwards for your millennial customers! It’s common practice to be accommodating and helpful with any customer, but 22% of millennials say that one bad experience is enough for them to leave a brand for good5. Just a heads up that this can also include boycotting a service, with nearly a quarter of all millennials saying they would be willing to boycott a company after just one bad experience4! Yikes. And with the rapid growth of e-commerce businesses, it’s not difficult for them to leave you and shop with competition. In many ways, your relationship with them now is tied to the future success of your business: once they find a company and product they like, 80% of Millennials will keep going back6.

Whatever your approach to customer support, understand that  millennials expect to be able to find what they need themselves. If they can’t, they don’t want to spend time waiting around for you to answer them (they’d rather go to the dentist, remember?), so get back to them quickly! They’re expected to eclipse Baby Boomers in spending power by 2018, at $3.39 trillion annually7, and will make up even more of your customer base.

Since 64% of millennials feel greater brand loyalty than their Baby Boomer or Generation X parents 8, they’re more likely to stick around if you give them the support they crave! Millennials are the future and they will remember everything you do for them now.

To learn how you can help your millennial customers help themselves, take a peek at our website self-service eBook “How to help your customers help themselves”.

Sources:

(1) 2014, Millennial Consumer Report, Nielson
(2) 2014, Millennials Drive Social Commerce, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
(3) 2015, State of Service Report, Salesforce Research
(4) 2015, Customer Survey: Results & Analysis, Desk.com
(5) 2015, Millennials Research Study, Aspect
(6) 2010, 8095 Exchange: Millennial Whitepaper, Edelman Digital
(7) 2010, Gen-Y Financial Services Survey, Oracle
(8) 2014, Millennial Brand Loyalty, Adroit Digital

Source: Customer Support and Millennials: What You Need to Know!

3 Ways to Enhance Talent Attraction & Retention through Corporate Philanthropy

Millennials Valunteering

Deeply rooted in today’s society and demonstrated time and time again, Millennials and Generation Z is a need to give back in more personal ways, make a change and find meaning in their work life. Some of the world’s biggest companies like GE and Walt Disney are fulfilling that need through corporate, socially conscious giving programs. But, how does corporate philanthropy really impact attraction and retention?

Corporate philanthropy enhances the employer brand

Millennials make up 75% of the workforce making their needs and desires much more influential when it comes to employer branding strategy. Project ROI found 80% of surveyed Millennials want to work for a company that cares about how it impacts and contributes to society. Over half would refuse to work for an irresponsible corporation. Even from a consumer standpoint, today’s society favors employers that make corporate philanthropy a priority and a part of its core values.

Engagement has become more than simply donating to whatever cause an employer chooses. By taking a strategic approach to corporate philanthropy companies can fuel involvement, personal satisfaction and even grow employees’ skills. From giving employees the chance to choose which charities to give back to, to incorporating skills-based volunteer opportunities, involving employees in the philanthropy process will greatly impact the bottom line.

Corporate philanthropy enhances employee wellness

Every employer wants happy employees, but happiness isn’t the kind of metric you can track. What we do know is, whether happiness is caused by their work or not, happy employees are more productive, satisfied and engaged in their work.

A recent Robert Half survey found 61% of U.S. workers who are involved in philanthropic activities outside of work feel it positively impacts their overall wellness, allows them to find a better work-life balance and it makes them more effective in their work.

Employers can make these effects even more impactful by having a corporate philanthropic program that lets employees put in their social awareness time on the job. This is a precious engagement opportunity that clearly has the potential to increase productivity and satisfaction, ultimately leading to increased retention and a favorable EB.

Corporate philanthropy ties employees to the values of the company

72% of Millennials feel a job where they can make an impact is important to their happiness and 58% would take a pay cut to work for a company with values aligned with their own. When it comes to accepting an offer, candidates prefer to work for an employer that engages in cause work.

From recruitment to engagement to retention, corporate philanthropy marries social responsibility with talent attraction and retention and then some, providing employees outlets that allow them to contribute back to the world while developing their talents, with the support of their employer. Money is an important deciding factor in the career choices people make, but the true motivation lies in how connected they are to their job and the company they work for.

Time continues to change for the better in today’s workforce. By cultivating an environment that embraces a need to find meaning in their work, employers are forced to change or modify their corporate philanthropy strategies in a way that not only makes employees work harder and gets candidates more interested, but directly impacts core values and the bottom line too. How does your company’s philanthropic efforts enhance the talent lifecycle?

About the Author 

Nita KirbyAs Director, Client Solutions at CyberGrants, Nita Kirby is about providing philanthropic strategic development, creating management processes, troubleshooting and ensuring client satisfaction and customer relationship management oversight.

CyberGrants is a software company that provides employee engagement and grants management software to connect the world’s givers to those who can benefit from them the most.


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What Organizations Need to Understand About Their Millennial Workforce

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Whiny, impatient, hard-to-please, disloyal – these are some of the adjectives associated with millennials at the workplace. This generation born between 1980 and 1996 has also been identified as job hoppers and the hardest to retain. Companies of all kinds are obsessed with understanding millennials better. The Global Human Capital Trends Report, 2016 also stated the rise of millennial workforce as a demographic upheaval, which is a major force of global change in the talent landscape.

The truth is – this particular lot of the population has more or less the same needs as their older generations. In fact, a study by IBM debunked most of the myths associated with millennials. It showed that they actually want the same things from their workplace like their older generations (except for a few differences in matters such as retirement plans!).

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But why are they still hopping jobs? 21% of millennial workers had left their jobs in the last year to do something else. Gallup has found that millennials struggle to find good jobs that engage them. In fact, millennials are the generation with the highest rates of unemployment and underemployment in the US. The problem of engagement is even severe with only 29% of employed millennials being engaged at work.

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The only explanation to this is that they are clearly not getting what they want. It’s not that the millennials have a completely different view of the world as compared to the older generations, or are asking for too much. With the digital wave setting in and technology being readily available to this generation, organizations need to understand what exactly is expected out of them.

This is extremely critical as the presence of millennials in the US is huge. They are going to make up 40% of the workforce by 2020 and 75% by 2025 (as per the U.S. Bureau of Statistics project). If such a major part of a generation is not engaged at work, the cost of it will also be huge! As per Gallup, millennial turnover costs the U.S, economy $30.5 billion annually. At the same time, 60% of millennials are open to new job opportunities – this basically means that for businesses, half of their millennial workforce doesn’t see a future with them.

As per Gallup, the following things set millennials apart from other generations:

  1. They really care about their job roles and view them as stepping stones and growth opportunities to their larger goals. 52% of millennials cite career progression as their first priority, followed by competitive salaries (PwC).
  2. They are deeply committed to what they do professionally.
  3. They do not want to work for bosses, but for coaches who invest and contribute to their personal and professional development.
  4. They want more than free beers and a fun workplace as opposed to Baby Boomers and GenXers – they need to be convinced why and how an organization will help them learn, grow and develop and further their careers.
  5. They want an emotional and behavioral connection with their jobs.
  6. They want a high level of well-being – be able to spend on things that they want, rather on things they should have. Work life balance is key for them and they aren’t getting it. As per a PwC research 28% of millennial respondents said that their work life balance was worse than they expected before joining.

What Millennials Want from Performance Management

Performance management is a very critical area for most companies to crack as it defines the relationship between a manager and an employee. Millennials want coaches over bosses, and they can only stick to an organization that gives them managers who would potentially invest and contribute to their personal and professional growth. Like any relationship to succeed, communication is crucial here as well. Millennials are hungry for frequent and consistent communication and feedback from their managers. Level of manager involvement is directly proportional to the level of engagement that a millennial employee might have:

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Lack of feedback – The reason for disengagement in this regard is also clear with statistics, as only 21% of millennials meet their managers on a weekly basis (Gallup). The exchange of feedback is low. Regular meetings, along with frequent feedback can lead to more engagement and better performance for teams as well as companies as a whole. Performance management needs to be a process spread over a year, rather than a year end discussion which focuses on assigning a number, which clearly is not holistic in nature.

Lack of flexible options – Along with feedback, millennials also wants flexibility at their workplace and move beyond the 9 to 5 cycle of drudgery. 77% of millennials say that flexible work hours are key to boosting productivity (Gallup). They love the idea of being able to work from any location with technology easily available – 39% of millennials believe that more options to work remotely would result in higher productivity.

Leadership and Millennials

89% of organizations cite leadership as one of their top challenges.

~ Global Human Capital Trends Report , 2016

Millennials bring high expectations to a workplace and they look for a recipe that gives them a rewarding, purposeful work experience, combined with constant learning and development opportunities that steers their career progression. Leaders and people managers are the most important stakeholders for driving engagement. HR managers should support leaders in creating an engaged environment at workplace. Leaders who motivate and coach their subordinates, who in turn motivate and engage theirs, are a key ingredient in creating a culture of engagement that sustains business results in a highly dynamic global environment. HR managers should demonstrate investment in helping leaders focus on building skills, empowering their colleagues as well as motivate individuals to ensure that they drive their own engagement.

In the Deloitte Millennial Survey 2016, 39 % of millennial respondents pointed to leadership as one of the most sought after aspects at the workplace. They also believe that businesses are not doing enough to bridge the gap and ensure that a new generation of business leaders is created. The survey also revealed that 71% of those millennials who are likely to leave their current company in the next two years are unhappy with how their leadership skills are being developed.

As per the Global Human Capital Trends report 2016, only 7% of surveyed respondents reported to have accelerated leadership programs for millennials. 28% of respondents reported weak or very weak leadership pipelines. And 21% of companies have no leadership programs at all! Many organizations are still finding it difficult to identify potential leaders and develop them, despite heavy investment being done to achieve the same.

On-the-job Training Opportunities

30% of executives see learning as the primary driver of employee development in the Global Human Capital Trends Report, 2016. Professional growth within the company is possible through learning and customized and blended training programs – which is something the young workforce is desperately looking for. Millennials have reported that they will move elsewhere if employers fail to provide learning opportunities to them. What needs to be done here is that employees need to be viewed as customers who long for satisfaction, rather than being treated as students who are pressurized into traditional classroom methodologies. This is the generation who loves exploiting the power of technology and mobile devices, and if learning programs are not aligned with these wants, they are most likely to leave that organization.

Millennials and other young employees have grown in a self-directed learning environment and have been exposed to the internet from an early stage. In fact, 85% of millennials access internet from their phones. They get most of the information they need from their mobile devices and 93% of millennials use social media to connect with their friends and family, as opposed to 84% in older generations. This is why they expect access to dynamic learning opportunities that fit their individual needs and schedules, as well as suit their talent and interests.

The digital wave has hit the world and the millennials want to take advantage of it. They want to be able to be on the move and work remotely. In fact, as per a study by PWC, 41% of miilennials prefer to communicate electronically at work than face to face or even over telephone.

What Organizations Need to Do

  • Help millennials grow: Only 28 percent of millennials feel that their current organizations are making ‘full use’ of the skills they currently have to offer (Deloitte Millennial Survey, 2016).

Managers need to really understand the personal and professional goals of millennials. Understand the areas that interest these passionate people and offer them opportunities in the same.

  • Mentoring: As per the Deloitte Millennial Survey, 2016, among those millennials who have somebody acting as a mentor, 83% are satisfied with this aspect of their working lives.

Millennials want and value frequent feedback unlike annual reviews that dominated in the past. They are more than willing to know how they are doing on a regular basis and expect real time feedback. Organizations need to make continuous feedback a major part of their engagement strategy.

  • Encourage learning: Millennials are hungry for knowledge and they want to experience as much as training as possible. Organizations need to focus deeply on this aspect and build and measure the effectiveness of learning programs, along with mentoring programs. Technology plays a key role here as it allows L&D professionals to play with the way they want training to happen, and also retain the interest of this young lot by providing them with innovative learning options. A lot of technological innovations have come up that have helped organizations train their staff as well as measure the effectiveness of their programs. Capabiliti by Qustn is one such product that has helped L&D professionals connect learning with their business goals. See how.
  • Focus on culture over profit: Millennials give more importance to people and culture over monetary aspects. Corporate values that are shared with and believed by millennials also promote loyalty—particularly when employers demonstrate a strong sense of company purpose beyond financial success. Those likely to remain longest share their organization’s values, and are more satisfied with its sense of purpose and support of professional development.
  • Flexible options: Currently, millennials lack flexible options as 77% wish to have greater mobile connectivity, such as via tablets and smartphones (Deloitte Millennial Survey, 2016). Lack of remote working options is also serving as the greatest gap between current supply and demand surrounds the issue of remote working—fully 75 percent would like to start to, or more frequently, work from home or other locations where they feel more productive. If organizations work around providing such options to millennials, it will definitely increase their levels of satisfaction and boost productivity.

About the Author

Bhaswati BhattacharrayaBhaswati is a Product Specialist at Capabiliti, a mobile-first training and engagement solution for enterprises. Passionate about Economics, Bhaswati also loves storytelling. She has a keen interest in start-ups, food and travel. In her ‘me time’ she picks up fiction novels, tries different cuisines or explores routes to less traveled places on the world map. Follow her on Twitter at @Bhaswatibh


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