Is AI Really A Threat To Jobs?

Artificial Intelligence | The HR Tech Weekly®

Has the future obliteration of jobs by automation been over-exaggerated? At the end of last year Bank of England Governor Mark Carney warned that up to 50% of UK jobs could be wiped out by automation. A recent report suggests that so far the AI-jobs apocalypse has yet to materialise.

Recent research from the Chartered Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors (CIEHF) together with CV-Library found that two thirds of businesses had not yet witnessed job losses due to automation. Over a third believed that automation had actually increased the number of jobs available.

This is a view broadly supported by Deloitte. In 2015, it highlighted the benefits of automation and its ability to create better quality jobs by removing tedious and dull work which increases the potential for errors due to boredom and distractions. Its research also noted that as a result of automation:

  • 3.5 million low risk jobs have been created since 2001, compared to 800,000 high risk jobs lost.
  • Each new low-risk job pays a salary £10,000 higher than the high risk job it replaced.

This does not alleviate concerns over automation. The CIPD’s Employee Outlook Survey also notes that nearly a quarter of employees are concerned that their job – or parts of it – may be automated within the next five years. Similarly, PwC’s UK Economic Outlook predicts that 30% jobs in the UK are at risk from automation by the early 2030s. Like Deloitte, however, it notes that the nature of available jobs will change. Sectors at highest risk of job losses through automation include transport, manufacturing, and wholesale and retail. Education and health and social work and education are at the lowest risk of being replaced.

Ongoing resistance to AI

The CIEHF/CV Library survey reports a ‘resistance’ among employees to automation as employers are failing to communicate its benefits effectively and HR remains one of the most reluctant to positively embrace automation within talent management strategies. Deloitte’s 2017 Human Capital Trends Survey found that progress towards people analytics in the last year remains stubbornly slow. This is perhaps unsurprising as nearly half of recruitment professionals are still not using applicant tracking software in hiring processes.

HR must first acknowledge the advantages of automation in recruitment to communicate its benefits more effectively. In hiring processes, this means the automation of mundane procedures, including personalised e-mails to job applicants, effective, streamlined screening to reduce unconscious bias and insights into key hiring metrics that impact your ability to hire. It also enables hiring teams to create a more effective onboarding processes to improve retention of new hires.

But why is HR so reluctant to embrace technology?

An article in the Harvard Business Review suggests that the resistance to AI is twofold. To accept and take advantage of automation, consumers must trust both in the technology and in the business delivering the innovation. In recruitment that means HR must have confidence in the supplier of recruitment software and its ability to deliver benefits to its hiring process.

The article also highlights three key points which are essential to gaining that confidence:

Cognitive compatibility : In other words, make it easy to understand. The more complex the nature of the technology, the less likely consumers are to trust its ability achieve desired goals. For HR, that goal is to streamline hiring processes to ensure not only faster hiring but a better quality of hire.

Trialability : A trial of potential new technology helps to understand the benefits and reduce any reluctance to embrace technology.

Usability : To encourage buy-in among tech-resistant hiring teams, technology, especially HR software, must be easy to use.

Recruitment software aside, as companies continue to invest in technology it is vital to maintain employee buy-in and foster trust by investing in upskilling employees to equip them to use digital skills in the workplace. The UK faces a significant digital skills crisis in addition to a wider talent shortage but employers are failing to invest in the necessary training to equip employees with vital skills. Training and development is essential for businesses that wish to not only retain but to continue to attract talent to their brand. It will also go some way to overcoming ‘resistance’ to technology in the workplace.

Ethical concerns

Overcoming ethical concerns is an issue that HR must consider in the future.

The EU[1] has proposed the creation of a European agency to provide technical, ethical and regulatory advice on robotics and AI, including the consideration of a minimum income to compensate people replaced by robots and a ‘kill switch’ for malfunctioning AI systems. A similar concern was recently expressed by the International Bar Association which warned that AI could ultimately lead to the introduction of legislation for quotas of human workers in the future[2].

While the debate over the benefits of AI at work continues, there is no doubt about the struggle that employers face to hire and retain qualified candidates. HR software is HR’s first step towards embracing the benefits of automation and creating more effective talent management strategies.

[1] MEPs vote on robots' legal status - and if a kill switch is required

[2] Rise of robotics will upend laws and lead to human job quotas, study says

A version of this article first appeared on Advorto’s website.

 

Google Hiring Space

Google Enters the Hiring Fray

Google Hire | The HR Tech Weekly®

It looks like Google was serious about entering the jobs space.

The Google Hire website appeared this month, and while it hasn’t been officially announced, the world’s largest data aggregator could be gearing up to launch an application tracking website which could rival LinkedIn, Greenhouse and Jobvite.

While this new website seems to be still in early stages of development, you can’t help but wonder: how is this new technology going to affect the jobs and recruiting space?

It makes perfect sense that both Facebook and Google would actively seek to gain control of a larger chunk of the jobs market. These platforms are already a definitive part of many people’s daily lives, so it is not surprising that they want to play an increasingly important role in the job search process. As we know, there are enormous possibilities where there are lots of people, and Facebook and Google have their markets comfortably cornered. Why go elsewhere when you’re looking for your next position?

So: how are they going about it?

Google, with the relatively recent introduction of their Cloud Jobs API, looks set to make a big impact, as their latest algorithms and intelligent data interpretation solutions set out to bridge the gaps between employers and job seekers in an unprecedented way: carefully matching the skills, experience and personal preferences of job seekers with the title, position, description and expectations of employees advertising specific job opportunities.

The Cloud Jobs API also has the ability to define the importance and level of various skills, as well as put such skills into the right context, in relation to any particular job requirement or opening available.

This happens through the use of various proprietary ontologies, which are meant to encode insights and information about different skills and occupations, as well shedding light on how such skills interact and correlate with each other. In short? Google will gather and assess your jobs data and match you with appropriate openings. Conversely, recruiters could potentially find perfect matches with pinpoint accuracy.

Interestingly, Google Hire openings have been listed on the bebop website, the VMware enterprise application development platform Google acquired in 2015. VMware’s cofounder, Diane Green was appointed to lead Google’s cloud push efforts that same year.

For Friendships Or Job Searches?

When I look at my Facebook feed, I’ll often see my friends using their status update to ask their network for job openings.  Now, Facebook has confirmed it had begun experimenting with recruiting features: “We’re running a test for Page admins to create job postings and receive applications from candidates.” The company is also actively investing more in functionality for recruiters and employers, giving them the ability to share job opportunities that are specifically visible to an audience that matches their standards (for example, the level of education required).

From a recruiter’s standpoint, Facebook is a goldmine, because it is such a huge repository of information about people. Individuals share a wide variety of data about themselves on their social media, from their basic information to their education level, their current employment, and their personal interests. If you want to gain an exhaustive profile of a candidate, you can’t do much better than Facebook.

As Facebook is already a definitive part of our daily lives, it’s not surprising that it could play an important role in the job searching industry. But do they run the same risks as platforms such as LinkedIn, where personal information becomes more curated to attract a certain job? Will people be pumping up their own profiles, not always accurately? The beauty of Facebook’s “raw and real” data may be quickly lost once people know recruiters are able to mine their information.

As both Facebook and Google enter the space, it confirms yet again that the rate of developments in our space is blinding, and that the new year might bring a few more tricks to learn yet.

About the Author:

Megan Flamer

Megan Flamer is an organizational development specialist who is fascinated by how people find and interact with their work and each other. She writes about recruitment, HR, human behaviour, and the future of work at 1-Page.com

1-Page on Social Media:

Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn | Google+

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HR Technology Tools Evolve to Handle Feedback, Performance and Agility

HR Tech MENA Summit returns for third edition in Dubai

Annual HR Tech MENA Summit 2017 Main Image

Dubai, 13 April, 2017 — HR Technology is fast developing. Year-on-year the trends, and market requirements keep developers busy. Driven by natural workplace changes and inspired by vastly different work ethics amongst new working demographics, HR Technology is continuously evolving from its traditional core of payroll, employee record management and recruitment.

Lorna Daly, Halogen Software
Lorna Daly, Regional Director, EMEA, Halogen Software

“People and their expectations of work are changing all over the world and it is happening quickly,” noted Ms. Lorna Daly, Regional Director, EMEA, Halogen Software who is a Gold Sponsor of the 3rd annual HR Tech Summit organized by QnA International. “We know that if people can give and receive feedback on an ongoing basis, they can feel good about what they do, and would be encouraged to bring their best effort forward, so they can give more to their customers, organizations and communities,” continued Ms. Daly.

Ongoing performance reviews, frequent and timely feedback is a new HR trend sweeping across many organizations across the globe. The need for almost immediate feedback stems from the multigenerational workforce, and the changing nature of work. “It comes down to something very fundamental; people want to feel a connection and a purpose to their organisation, that their contribution is valued and impactful,” stressed Ms. Daly.

To meet this new HR demands, organisations need to employ the new technological trends becoming available in the market place. In addition to traditional services of HR software, and cloud-based services, technological tools built for agility and for specialized purposes such as continuous performance management, frequent feedback, data analysis and learning tools will soon become an absolute must for the continued evolution of an organization.

However, Ms. Daly cautions on the blind application of these new HR technology tools, suggesting that organizations should “First recognise if the organisation is culturally ready to make the shift from traditional to ongoing performance management. Second, company leaders must be ready to act as role models for the rest of the staff. Culturally ready organizations are those which champion flexibility and adaptability to refine processes through the constant collection of feedback on new processes. This feedback loop ensures employees are supported.”

“Keeping up with technology developments affecting HR is becoming a tough task. The managerial processes for human resources across the globe is in a state of fluidity. Especially in the UAE and GCC which will see two new shifts with the onboarding of nationalization and VAT policies in the coming years, the importance of employing and using the appropriate tools for HR functions cannot be stressed more. Knowing the challenging changes ahead, we have planned the 3rd annual HR Tech Summit to provide in-depth discussions and ultimately provide a platform HR and IT Leaders to analyse the HR technology tools available, their uses, and whether or not they should be adapted and when adapted how it will impact the organizations in the region,” commented Sidh N.C., Director, QnA International.

On the trend of nationalization in the UAE and GCC, Ms. Daly said, “There is a great opportunity for business and HR leaders in the GCC to maximise the potential that exists in their respective region. In order to do this, organisations need to understand the existing skill sets of local nationals, continuously support the development of essential skills, and help with the career progression of local nationals into leadership positions. This effort will help organisations become an attractive destination for GCC citizens seeking employment and help shape the economic destiny of the region.”

Halogen Software will be actively taking part in the by-invite only premier summit which attracted over 150 C-level and senior level HR and IT personnel from government, state, public, and private organizations in 2016. “HR Tech MENA provides a terrific opportunity to connect with some of the world’s most thoughtful HR and business leaders. The partnership has opened the door to connect with very successful companies and has given us the opportunity to learn more about the emerging global trends and priorities in HR,” commented Ms. Daly on the importance of sponsoring, participating, and attending the 3rd annual HR Tech Summit.

The Summit will be held from 16-17 May 2017 at The Westin Dubai, Al Habtoor City, Dubai.

About HR Tech MENA

HR Tech Mena

Technology today has revolutionized every step of our lives and Human Resources is no different. The influence of technology on our evolution is paramount to making it imperative for HR to keep abreast with newest developments.

Today, HR is en route to becoming smart HR. Concepts such as Artificial Intelligence, big data, cloud, social workforce, mobility and gamification are key buzzwords and every organization is keen to embrace to help them in tackling the key issues of talent acquisition, talent management, change management, business performance and employee engagement.

The HR Tech Summit is the only initiative that brings together HR as well as IT professionals from across the Middle East and leading solution providers on a singular platform discussing the newest trends, ideas and disruptions over a period of two days exclusively dedicated to and focused on HR Technology.

About Halogen Software

Halogen Software

Halogen Software offers a cloud-based talent management suite that reinforces and drives higher employee performance across all talent programmes — whether that is performance management, learning and development, succession planning, recruiting and onboarding, or compensation. With over 2,100 customers worldwide, Halogen Software has been recognized as a market leader by major business analysts and has garnered the highest customer satisfaction ratings in the industry. Halogen Software’s powerful, yet simple-to-use solutions, which also include industry-vertical editions, are used by organisations that want to build a world-class workforce that is aligned, inspired and focused on delivering exceptional results. For more information, visit: http://www.halogensoftware.com/ae Subscribe to Halogen Software’s TalentSpace blog: http://www.halogensoftware.com/blog/ or follow Halogen Software on Twitter: http://twitter.com/HalogenSoftware.

Organiser: About QnA International

QnA International

QnA International creates and delivers business learning and development exchange platforms through B2B conferences, bespoke events and trainings. The company also has an expertise in outsourced sponsorship sales and key account management.

Website: www.qnainternational.com

People Science: Why Your Employees Are Your Most Important Asset

Written by Adam Hale, CEO at Fairsail.

People Science

We are in the midst of a global skills crisis that is forcing companies to rethink how they attract and retain the right talent. Imagine being able to know why the top salesperson at a business has quit, and then how to ensure it doesn’t happen again. What if businesses could use the profiles of their top performers to identify the candidates most likely to be high performers in the future.

Business leaders are looking for more, data-driven people decisions enabling business goals. I’m not talking about simplistic HR metrics and KPIs; I’m talking about People Science. This means being able to know why one of the firm’s top performers has quit, or what experiences new hires need to get up to speed quickly. It means the ability to hire and develop the right people today while building the skills needed for tomorrow.

What’s more – today’s people insights can prevent tomorrow’s problems. For example, the capability to know the reason why a top performer has quit can help to ensure that the business builds the right work environment, offers the right compensation packages, and creates consistently great workforce experiences to ensure that it doesn’t happen again in the future. By looking at the profiles of the best business leaders today, and the skills likely to be needed in the future, tomorrow’s leaders can be identified and developed so they are ready with the right skills at the right time.

It’s not just about what the business wants though; employees have high expectations too. They want achievable targets based on metrics, specific reasons why they haven’t been promoted, and insight which can help them to develop. For example, it may be possible to let a sales consultant know they don’t perform as well when pitching to prospective clients in teams, which could enable them to improve the way they collaborate with their colleagues.

There’s a growing theme here. These examples of insight gleaned from data aren’t just about HR; they’re about people and the overall business. Put simply, a new approach is required to the HR function. Automating existing HR processes is not enough. HR leaders need to become Chief People Officers – thinking differently about how they engage with employees and design better ways of working to drive productivity and retain your best people. The power of People Science is real, and it could make a huge difference in being able to outwit rivals, ensure the business has a competitive edge and be able to retain and recruit top talent.

About the Author:

Adam Hale, CEO at Fairsail

Adam Hale, CEO at Fairsail, previously acted as Executive Chairman and Non Executive Director having spent over 30 years in the technology industry. He was formerly Head of Software and European Technology at Russell Reynolds Associates, the leading executive search firm and before that ran large system implementation projects at Accenture. Adam is also a committee member of the Technology Leadership Group (TLG) for the Prince’s Trust.


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New Speakers at HR Tech World London Have Been Announced

HR Tech World London 2017

LONDON, February 24, 2017 — In addition to recently announced Baroness Karren Brady, Leading UK Female Business Leader, 14 exciting new speakers up on our speakers page.

Chris Parke, CEO of Talking Talent, is joining the WOMEN IN TECH PANEL at the Main Stage.

Chris is CEO and co-founder of Talking Talent, a global coaching and consulting practice. Talking Talent partner with some of the world’s leading organisations to help them accelerate their performance by attracting, retaining and progressing talented women to all levels. It is a real systemic approach to building inclusive cultures.

As the world becomes ever more digitally driven and every industry is being reimagined, the dearth of women in technology is becoming increasingly problematic. In this panel discussion, we will discuss the root causes behind of the lack of women in technology, how this is harming innovation and our collective future and what leading organizations are doing about it.

Other breakout speakers:

Di Macdonald – VP Global Learning & Communications @ Expedia – LEARNING

Di is super passionate about understanding how people want to learn and ensuring solutions fit that. She has worked to build apps to reach global audiences, focusing on creating cool, relevant content.  At Expedia, she has come up with solutions to reach sales people on the go in places from New York to Koh Samui. 

Sue Mace – Head of Talent Development @ Shop Direct – LEARNING

Leading the Talent Development function for Shop Direct, Sue and her team create unique development experiences helping every person in the business be the best they can be and supporting the Shop Direct transformation.  Previous to her role at Shop Direct, Sue held Talent and Leadership Development roles at the University of Liverpool and RSA.

Mark Barlow – CEO & Founder @ AppLearn – ADOPTION

Mark has been working in the HR software field since 2001 (when he founded Qikker Solutions Ltd, which became a performance and talent management solution provider). He is the founder and CEO of AppLearn.

Dr. Conor Taylor –  Physiologist @ GB Cycling Team – ADOPTION

Dr. Conor Taylor is a physiologist for the Great Britain Cycling Team. He drives optimum performance for the Great Britain Cycling Team.

Caroline Porteous – Transformation Leader @ Adobe – DIGITAL HR

Caroline and her team aim to transform the world through digital and exceptional customer experiences, by simplifying and accelerating the way business is done through paperless processes and a mobile first strategy. Caroline’s 15 year experience has focused on IaaS with the digital security of data and SaaS solutions which deliver transformational ROIs.

Piet Hein van Dam – VP Europe @ Seedlink Technologies – DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

Piet Hein is a data-entrepreneur combining science and business. He is VP Europe for the AI-startup Seedlink. He was CEO of ‘big data’ startups Wakoopa and Zapaday and is now responsible for rolling out Seedlinks predictive recruitment technology in Europe.

Ineke Pet – Head of HR and Organizational Development @ Martha Flora – DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

Head of Organizational Development at Martha Flora in terms of vision and strategic issues including business processes, organizational structure, leadership and investment in people in terms of professionalism and autonomy; with the aim to improve care for elderly with dementia.

Pamela Hutchinson – Head of Diversity & Inclusion EMEA @ Bloomberg LP – DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

Pamela is Head of Diversity and Inclusion for Europe, Middle East and Africa at Bloomberg. In this role she leads the company’s global diversity and inclusion initiative in the region, serving as a partner and thought leader on strategy and vision. 

Product demo speakers:

Tom Payne – Head of International Client Success @ Adobe

Tom oversees the Client Success organisation in EMEA and APAC for Adobe’s Enterprise Document Cloud customers. His team are responsible for ensuring Adobe’s customers reach return on investment from the products they procure through the life of the relationship. 

Paul Consterdine – Director EMEA @ Thomson Online Benefits

Paul joined Thomsons in April 2010, and his core expertise is in helping global organisations such as Facebook, IBM and Microsoft drive performance through automated benefits management. Paul works to align technology with business goals, delivering tangible value to employees.

Nick Hutchinson – Solutions Consultant @ Lumesse

Nick has been a Solutions Consultant at Lumesse since 2016. He has worked for many years in the recruitment industry delivering the best possible results for his clients and candidate and it’s his job to ensure that Lumesse is on the cutting edge of recruiting technology innovation. 

Fabio Cardilli – European Product Leader @ Talentia Software

Fabio is a graduate in Computer Science with 20 years of experience in the IT Sector. Having worked with many multinational HR software providors, he’s today a passionate product leader bringing vision and creativity to Talentia.

Mark Williams – Research Director @ MHR

Mark is a ‘futurist’ and technology critic, with provocative views of technology and its application in the workplace. He leads the research team at MHR. 

About HR Tech World:

In 5 years, HR Tech World has exponentially grown from 400 to 6000 attendees. In 2017, the appetite for the Greatest HR Shows on Earth will scale to +10,000 attendees from over 120 countries!

Technology continues to change our understanding of the world around us and in ways we had never imagined. Within 10 years, over half of the office occupations in the world will be displaced by technology. How do we manage this? How do we capitalize on this? And where is tech leading the Future of Work?

With Brexit, Cognitive HR, a possible global leadership crisis, and disruptions occurring in unpredictable ways, we’ll be in London to help you navigate the changes and the possibilities interwoven with HR and tech.

What Millennials Really Want In 2017 | The HR Tech Weekly®

What Millennials Really Want In 2017

What Millennials Really Want In 2017 | Woobe

Conventional wisdom holds that Millennials are entitled, easily distracted, impatient, self-absorbed, lazy, and unlikely to stay in any job for long. Furthermore, they want free food; they want unlimited vacation; they want to run the company two days after they arrive. But, on the positive side, they’re also looking for purpose, feedback, and personal life balance in their work. Companies of all kinds are obsessed with understanding them better. Let’s talk, for once, about the positive attitudes:

  • Millennials will sacrifice salary for a better work environment: 25- to 35-year-olds said they’d be willing to give up an average of $7,600 in pay for a better situation at the office, such as more career development and a healthier work/life balance.
  • Millennials want to work for the greater good: 73% of Millennials seek meaningful work at an organization with a mission they support. In fact, a remarkable 90% say they want to use their skills for good, suggesting that Millennials seek workplaces with a culture of altruism that enables them to give back. Millennials also care about workplace culture, with 77% noting it is just as or more important than salary and benefits.
  • Millennials want to be entrepreneurial: giving your employees the flexibility and freedom, where possible, to be their own boss with a focus exclusively on results, produces greater employee engagement, loyalty and ultimately better business results.
  • Millennials want to be coached: they crave and respond to a good, positive coach. Overall, Millennials want feedback 50% more often than other employees. Their number one source of development is their manager, but only 46% thinks that their manager delivered on their expectations for feedback.
  • Millennials want to design their own career paths: an essential component of Millennial employee engagement is letting them have a voice in how their careers are structured. The one-size-fits-all approach to building careers simply doesn’t work for Millennials’ ambitions. They desire amazing, personalized experiences and the chance to prove their abilities and quickly rise through the ranks. Unlike the traditional career paths, which tended to be more linear, Millennials are forging nonlinear and unique career paths that are aligned with a personal sense of purpose.

Leaders are increasingly turning their attention to the millennial generation, whose attitudes and preferences may profoundly reshape workplaces and society. Like those in every generation before them, millennials strive for a life well-lived. They want good jobs and they also want to be engaged in those jobs. In addition to finding engaging jobs, millennials want to have high levels of well-being. They also want a purposeful life and active community and social ties. Are millennials getting what they want out of work and life? Not so much. Gallup’s latest report, finds that millennials struggle to find good jobs that engage them. Millennials have the highest rates of unemployment and underemployment and only 29% of employed millennials are engaged at work.

Their overall well-being nearly matches that of Gen Xers and Baby Boomers, meaning millennials have not been able to forge better paths for themselves, and that’s because of the corporate environment that is not ready to deal with this generation. They need to teach them the social skills that they are missing because of the digital and hyperconnected world they live in. Relationships are built on little things and, since trust doesn’t build in one big event, they have to create mechanism where they allow for the little interactions to happen. To achieve this, you can’t rely on the current social tools or add a new one because, as a matter of fact, too much connectivity kills connectivity.

The key it’s to bring back real human contact but, for large organisations, the only available solution is organising big corporate events which unfortunately aren’t effective. That’s because when you put 100 people in the same room, and hope they will talk, they tend instead to stay with people who already know. A better solution would be organising 25 small events of 4 people each:  that’s how you create new links between people. Unfortunately, finding the right person at the right time for these events is a nightmare without the right tool.

Woobe solves this problem with an innovative approach: managing profiles (age, seniority, departments, etc.) instead of individuals and adopting push communication instead of pull communication. In few clicks, and in less than 5 minutes, you can create a campaign of hundred micro-events! Watch how simple it is in this video:


Source: What Millennials really want in 2017 – Woobe

Brexit, Trump, and the Future of Work | The HR Tech Weekly®

Brexit, Trump, and the Future of Work

Written by Alex Cooper, on behalf of HR Tech World.

trump-brexit-and-the-future-of-work-blue

There’s no doubt the world is going through a huge shift in paradigms when it comes to conceptualizing work. While technology rapidly advances, companies are trying their best to adapt. Tech is changing how we understand what we do, how we work, and even how we see the world around us. The disruption that technology is having in the world of work, however, is not the only disruption entering our lives. With the Brexit referendum passing in the United Kingdom and the election of Donald Trump in the United States, disruption seems to have gone ballistic.

As Josh Bersin notes, understanding the future of work is more than just simply comprehending technological innovation. The political events occurring in some of the world’s leading economic powers are drastically changing our approaches to society, the workplace, and how we view each other. Regardless of where you fall on the political spectrum, the fact remains that these two events have drastically changed HR and work, not only in the respective countries, but globally.

Brexit, which has dominated the news channels in the U.K. and the E.U, has already had a huge impact on people and work. At the core is the unresolved question as to what this means for those living in the U.K. who are able to work and live there due to the E.U.’s free movement of labor policy. As soon as the results were in, businesses and their HR departments had to immediately confront the problems of how to deal with future recruitment plans and how to manage the implications for staffing and profitability if the U.K. were to leave the European single-market.

The U.K. government, led by Prime Minister Theresa May, currently appears to have set the controls for a hard break with the E.U., and as of yet there is no released plan for the road ahead; in spite of this, somehow companies must reevaluate their talent acquisition plans and employer branding. Although PM May insisted this week that E.U. citizens would maintain their right to live in the U.K. Without a concrete legal guarantee, there is little to stem the tide of fear and uncertainty this creates for people and organisations. The Financial Times recently reported that 58 percent of senior executives in major U.K. companies believe the Brexit referendum has negatively affected business:

“In terms of their priorities for the forthcoming negotiations, the business leaders said movement of labour and access to skilled labour came the highest, followed by securing free trade or retaining the single market with the EU and passporting rights. The interviewees said that to be successful in a post-Brexit UK, they wanted the level and complexity of regulation to be reduced and for it to still be easy to recruit EU staff.”

The other obvious shockwave is the rise of Donald Trump in the United States. President Trump relied heavily on his business experience during the campaign and used it to his advantage with the electorate. Yet, in his two weeks in office, Trump has received a backlash from within the business community due to a recent executive order on immigration.

Business leaders came out strongly against the ban because it directly conflicts with their operations. Bloomberg reported that Google CEO Sunar Pichai sent a note to employees after the order was issued condemning the ban and informing the company that the executive order affected 100 Google employees. Google also recalled staff from abroad because of the roll out of the ban, which temporarily barred even employees with work visas and permanent resident status in the U.S. from re-entering the country.

The order barring individuals from seven Muslim-majority countries—Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen—has since been temporarily stopped by federal court.

At the end of the day, Article 50 still hasn’t been triggered and Trump is only 2 weeks into his presidency with the ban being frozen. However, these situations have caused alarm and posed questions about employees positions within the organizations in which they work, whether they are non-U.K. EU citizens in the U.K. or workers in the U.S. from one of the countries included in Trump’s immigration ban. There are at time of writing no clear paths as to what is next; negotiations between the UK and the E.U. have yet to begin, and in the US states and rights groups are pushing back against the immigration ban through the legal system.

As we move through the first few months of 2017 Brexit and the Trump Presidency leave companies and their HR departments no hiding place; they must begin planning for a wide variety of disruptive scenarios. Businesses are already developing ways to counteract any negative effect and those that are the most agile are often better able to cope with disruption. On the subject of Brexit, for example a Financial Times report states, “A large majority [of business leaders] — 96 per cent — was confident their business could adapt to the consequences of leaving the EU, and more than two-thirds had already taken action in response to the referendum result. A tenth were moving business outside the UK.”

In an interview with HRN about Brexit for the upcoming HR Tech World London show, economist Daniel Thorniley told Peter Russell, Director of Research and Development at HRN, “companies and HR departments will need to show a lot of consideration for staff in how the want to retain staff and motivate them over the next 2-3 years… This time of elevated uncertainty will show which companies can produce Best Practice in HR.”

With socio-economic and political disruption coming in on top of all the media noise on artificial intelligence and robotics it’s no small wonder there is fear and confusion about where the future of work is headed. Precarity does not seem to be dissolving anytime soon; a calm breath, alongside a compassionate and proactive stance should be pushed to the fore. Being preemptive in this regard could save businesses from impaired employee performance, future talent and recruitment headaches, and do much to inject a massive boost of trust and confidence into both worried employees, and those hard-earned employer brands.

About the Author:

Alex Cooper is the Content Specialist of HRN, organizer of HR Tech World shows, and curates the HRN Blog. You can follow him on Twitter @wgacooper.


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Smart Solutions for a Smart Workspace

Smart Workspace Design Summit

Amsterdam, February 6, 2017 – In eight months, design leaders will meet in Amsterdam in order to discuss how workplaces are organized, equipped, managed and how they should look in the future.

Moreover, you’ll be able to find several activities and opportunities under one roof. The exhibition will see delegates, visitors and exhibitors meeting and gaining new contacts and perspectives. The exhibition floor will be populated with various types of smaller stands as well as three big Showcase stands which will provide people with a unique walk-in, touch & feel experience.

Two conferences and four workshops where 50+ speakers, 150+ delegates and 1500+ visitors will bring an interactive experience to all visitors, be they facility managers, architects, designers, technology experts, representatives of startups or members of the general public, make this exhibition a must-attend for fans of design as well as professionals. 

The next Annual Smart Workspace Design Summit is taking place in the beautiful Zuiveringshal West building in Westergasfabriek in Amsterdam.

View all the visiting and exhibiting options and mark the dates 12 – 13 October 2017 in your calendar. 

About Fleming.

Fleming. connects people who know the answers, brings you the know-how you seek and the opportunities you desire, creating Critical Business Connections. After 13 years in the business, Fleming. has grown to offer a complete portfolio of Conferences, Trainings, Exhibitions, Blended Learning and Online Conferences on five continents and in various industries. More than 50,000 satisfied companies supporting, attending, and endorsing Fleming events and using its services every year prove that Fleming. is the right partner to support your business growth and help you achieve your goals.

Keeping your finger to the pulse: HR’s digital solutions for 2017

Keeping your finger to the pulse: HR’s digital solutions for 2017

Man with MacBook Pro on wooden pier

It’s not uncommon to learn that some businesses are reluctant to update the tried and tested methods. It’s not difficult to get stuck in a digital rut. Particularly if companies have been trading for many years. Time has taught us to think if it’s not broken don’t fix it, but in this case; we’re wrong.

Taking on paperless processes

Technology is everywhere. Today businesses are expected to be online in some capacity. And whilst it’s understandable that in a hands on industry like retail it might feel unnecessary to take on new tech, from a business perspective; it makes no sense not to.

Spending time hunting through piles of paper slows down response time in an age when most answers are a click away. Eliminating paper not only updates your methods and reduces the amount of paper your company consumes. But it also reduces the time and money spent managing it. It also ensures that none of your documents go missing, that all your information easily searchable and backed up in a centralised location keeping all your information is secure. By taking on digital solutions your company can embrace these benefits whilst upping your efficiency and professional image.

So, what’s the best way to do this in HR?

Aside from the hundreds of cloud solutions that are adaptable and available today, there are different operating systems with a HR focus. Charlie, Zoho, and People HR are just a select few to look at. Adopting these will make your HR department more efficient, and help take your paper based work online. Managing the day to day processes typical of a HR department. Such as, payroll, team details, holidays and sick days.

HR trends – what to look out for

Now in 2017, different principles apply. These recent trends are what you need to be aware of in order to stay ahead.

A millennial workforce

The biggest trend for recruiting will be concerned with millennials. Unlike their previous baby-boomer generation, millennials are a more demanding workforce[1]. They are more likely to to need constant validation, communicate through social media and require a lot more guidance. The challenge for HR is to attract and retain this talent in an innovative way. And there are a variety of techniques and apps that can help with this.

  • Start regularly recognising good work – Boost employee confidence in their work by using TapMyBack. This app works through peer-to-peer recognition, and gives managers great insight to their teams on where needs improvement or celebrating.
  • Continuous assessments – this will mean employees are able to recognise any problems and correct them. This will encourage growth in their role and identify when an employee is suitable for a promotion.
  • Non-traditional performance reviews – With a reputation as negative and demotivating, the majority of staff dread their performance reviews. Tools like OrangeHRM can help you easily track progress and produce reviews on your employees, giving you time to focus on improving this process.
  • Have your social media experts follow relatable trends for millennials – this will help to engage with them regularly whilst ensuring current and any prospective employees relate to your brand. Free tools like Social Mention and Twazzup can ensure you keep on top of this.

Maintaining company culture and hiring the right team

2016 found that 84% of candidates would consider leaving their current job if a more attractive role was available[2], and with the millennial generation always on the lookout for better opportunities; finding the right person and then retaining talent is becoming more of a challenge for HR. This can mean sieving through a high volume of C.V’s often in a short period of time, especially around the seasonal period, making it easy for an applicant to go unrecognised. Which leads on to…

Updating processes around recruitment

One way HR managers are attempting to become proactive in their recruiting search is by looking to social media. Research from Aberdeen Group has seen 73% of 18-34 year olds find their most recent job through social media[3]. And as social platforms have a large millennial population[4]; it not only makes sense to recruit from these online sources, but it also financially makes sense as it’s a very cost effective solution. A software options such as JobVite are available to simplify your social recruiting process. Along with others like HireRabbit and BranchOut.

Electronic signature solutions are also a very effective way of streamlining your recruitment process. As soon as you have selected your successful candidate you can email their contract through the e-signature platform. They can then review and sign according to their schedule, or even on-the-go, and contracts are returned as soon as they’re completed. Removing the need for in-store visits and cut out printing and postage costs. Try Signable’s free trial for an e-sig solution.

Take on new technology today

Don’t waste your time with systems that are time consuming and feel counterproductive. Using software as a solution means your business is constantly innovating and streamlining it’s approach. And as a report by Business Review Europe highlights how “new technology adoption is crucial to business success … businesses can only progress as quickly as IT enables them to – it’s business at the speed of IT.”[5]

About the Author:

bio-pic

Jessie Davies is a Marketing Manager at Signable and also goes by the title “Content Queen”. Signable is an electronic signature platform that helps businesses get their documents finalised faster. As Content Queen she ensures that Signable’s customer’s resource for support, educational content and industry updates are always available and clear. Jessie also makes sure the Twitter feed is full of hilarious reaction gifs and sarcastic comments.

Website | Twitter | Facebook

References:

[1] Millennial workforce - Source

[2] Recruitment stats - Source

[3] Social recruitment stats - Source

[4] Social media millennial stats - Source

[5] Business Review Europe - Source

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HR's Aversion To AI Will Affect Its Ability To Hire

HR’s Aversion To AI Will Affect Its Ability To Hire

Artificial Intelligence

Successful hiring should be based on evidence based decisions supported by technology and automation but HR remains slow to respond. PwC’s 20th Global CEO Survey found that nearly half (47%) of UK CEOs are failing to address the impact AI and automation will have on their businesses (compared to 31% globally and just 19% in Germany). As 83% of UK CEOs rank access to skills as their number one barrier to business success in the next 12 months, this needs to change.

Why the reluctance to engage?

HR has often demonstrated a wariness of data and more recently automation and AI, exacerbated by recent headlines including:

  • Fukoku Mutual Life Insurance in Japan announced its intention to automate the jobs of over 30 employees, replacing them with IBM’s Watson Explorer. According to the Nomura Research Institute, half of all jobs in Japan could be performed by robots by 2035.
  • A similar scenario was projected in the UK, with the prospect of 15 million jobs being eradicated by AI, shortly after an announcement that outsourcing specialist Capita was replacing 2,000 of its employees with automation.
  • The world’s largest hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates intends to automate three-quarters of its hiring decisions over the next five years. The company is building a robotic recruitment platform to remove ‘emotional volatility’ from business decision.

How AI and automation empower HR

AI and automation offer a number of benefits for HR:

Talent pipeline : In its simplest form automation identifies issues in your talent pipeline, such as, qualified candidates abandoning a prolonged application process. Algorithms are also used to reveal factors which improve employee engagement and identify leadership potential. This is relevant in a week when a Robert Half survey found that that half of all candidates for management level roles don’t possess leadership skills.

More effective candidate selection : HR has historically relied on standard but limited candidate selection criteria, such as interview performance or an emphasis on technical skills or qualifications but that isn’t sufficient to predict a quality hire. Broader, evidence based HR is needed to support effective candidate selection, which algorithms in your recruitment software offer.

Potential flight risks : Combined with predictive analytics, algorithms can also predict potential flight risks in your organisation. With an expected talent exodus in 2017 understanding why your high achievers leave is critical. Typical ‘prompts’ include birthdays (especially milestones) and work anniversaries but your own recruitment metrics will provide more insight.

Reduction in bias : Automation and AI help to eradicate unconscious bias. This is exemplified by the tendency to hire so-called ‘brogrammers’ across the US’s Silicon Valley, fuelling the image of a male dominated tech culture. Closer scrutiny revealed that the majority attended elite schools and secured their jobs through friends or the tech fraternity. AI start-up Tara.ai aims to change that bias. Tara removes information relating to age, gender, previous employment, education and race to assess candidates based on the quality of their work – analysing and ranking programmers’ code – rather than their personal connections or background. Selecting specific criteria within your applicant tracking software helps to achieve the same results.

Technology needs the human touch

Should HR be wary? Algorithms in the hiring process have been proven to make better hiring decisions than humans but the role of HR, while shifting, is integral to the future of AI.

The following strategies can help to make the vital transition to evaluating the benefits of AI and automation in hiring:

  • Technology is only as effective as the information gathered. Inputting bad data will produce poor quality results. The quality of your data is vital.
  • When posting open jobs, understand the precise skills you need from your new hire. A candidate persona improves recruitment success for either high volume or stand-alone critical positions.
  • Algorithm or AI averse hiring teams can begin with automated recruitment software that streamlines the hiring process and analyses the common patterns revealed in your recruitment metrics. Start by focusing on just one specific area. With qualified candidates in short supply, time to hire is one of the most important metrics your business can measure and allows HR to evaluate the effectiveness of automated recruitment systems.
  • Create a structured interview process supported by online tests during screening to assess cognitive ability, conscientious and leadership.
  • Final decisions on candidate selection should be collaborative and supported by relevant data gathered during the hiring process. The CIPD found that, in organisations that use HR analytics, a quarter of senior leaders are not being given access to HR data to make effective business decisions. Without data, your ability to attract and hire high achievers is restricted.

HR technology should be simple to use, easy to engage with and produce data which informs and drives talent acquisition strategies.

Introducing a ‘kill switch’?

While AI and automation are now unavoidable, justifiable concerns exist over its growing impact on the workplace. In response to these concerns, the European Commission’s Legal Affairs Committee is seeking the creation of a European agency to provide technical, ethnical and regulatory advice on robotics and AI within the EU. Its proposal recommends:

  • A voluntary code of conduct related to AI.
  • A ‘kill switch’ in all AI systems to ensure they can be automatically deactivated in the event of a malfunction.
  • Consideration of a minimum income to compensate people who have been replaced by robots in the workplace.
  • A new status of ‘electronic persons’ for autonomous robots.
  • Reassurance that the use of robots does not engender ‘fear of physical or psychological harm’, while maintaining privacy, human dignity and safety.

HR is a long way from dealing with those issues on a daily basis but employers must begin now to address the impact of AI and automation in the working environment to remain competitive and meet future business goals.


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