Benefits of Using Humor in the Workplace

How can you benefit by making your everyday office life more fun?

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Why should you use humor at the workplace?

Using humor in the workplace has many benefits. Office humor can come in many different forms – it can be an office joke, prank or funny employee awards event.

Any event, no matter how big or small, infused with humor can brighten up a regular, everyday life at the office and bring a smile to everyone’s face.

The benefits of using humor in the workplace

Besides making you and your colleagues feels good and less stressed, using humor at the workplace has many additional, proven benefits. Dr. David Abramis at Cal State Long Beach has studied fun at work for years.

He discovered that employees who have fun on the job are more creative, more productive, better decision-makers and get along better with co-workers. They also have fewer absentee, late, and sick days than people who aren’t having fun.

Therefore, the main benefits of using humor at the workplace are:

  • Increased employee engagement
  • Increased employee productivity
  • Lower absenteeism
  • Decreased turnover rates.

These are certainly some very good reasons to have some fun at the office. Aren’t they?

Rules for using humor at the workplace

A good office humor is the one that everyone can enjoy and laugh about. Be careful not to go overboard and hurt somebody’s feelings or embarrass or humiliate your coworkers.  

How to introduce humor at your workplace?

Here are 2 great ways to introduce humor to your workplace:

  1. Funny employee awards

    Turn your old, boring “Employee of the month” award into something much more fun! Check out our list of ideas for funny employee awards!
  2. Funny office pranks

    There is nothing that can bring out so much fun and laugh like a well thought office prank. When was the last time you enjoyed making a practical joke on your co-workers? If you’re looking for inspiration, check out our list of the top 20 office prank ideas!

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Infographic: 7 Key Employee Turnover Statistics

Check out the 7 key employee turnover statistics presented in a cool infographic!

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Struggling with employee turnover?

Are you struggling with high employee turnover?

Or are taking proud in an extremely low turnover rate in 2018?

Maybe you’ve yet to learn how to calculate your company’s employee turnover rate?

Either way, these statistics will help you learn more about employee turnover and provide an important benchmark for evaluating your company’s employee turnover statistics.

7 key employee turnover statistics

Here is the list of the 7 key employee turnover statistics:

Employee turnover statistic #1

  • According to Gallup, 51% of employees are considering a new job.

Employee turnover statistic #2

  • A report from the Center for American Progress found that turnover can cost organizations anywhere from 16% to 213% of the lost employee’s salary.

Employee turnover statistic #3

  • Future Workplace and Kronos study has found that 87% of employers said that improving retention is a critical priority for their organization.

Employee turnover statistic #4

Employee turnover statistic #5

Employee turnover statistic #6

  • MRINetwork has found that 72% of candidates are driven by career advancement opportunities which are the number one reason why people change jobs.

Employee turnover statistic #7

Companies that offer remote work experience 25% lower employee turnover, according to OWL Labs.

Infographic: Employee turnover statistics

Here is the infographic with the top 7 employee turnover statistics:

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Top 3 Myths About Employee Turnover Debunked

Everything you know about employee turnover rate is just plain wrong, according to a recent research.

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Everything you know about employee turnover is wrong

The end of a year is a common time when most HR professionals are calculating their annually HR metrics. One of the most commonly used HR metrics is a dreaded employee turnover rate. Are you a bit scared to calculate your employee turnover rate?

If you are, this is because everything you know about employee turnover is wrong.

Yes, that’s right. According to a recent research conducted by Work Institute, everything we think we knew about employee turnover is just plain wrong. The company has released its 2018 Retention Report, the only known one of its kind, marking its second study of national workplace turnover and retention. Using a scientifically valid methodology and data from over 234,000 exit interviews, this report uncovers the root causes of turnover and debunks common employee turnover myths.  

Top 3 myths about employee turnover

Here are the top 3 myths about employee turnover that are completely wrong:

Myth #1: Employee turnover is inherently bad

Employee turnover is usually mentioned in a negative context. This is because of high costs related to high turnover rates. According to The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) research, direct replacement costs can reach as high as 50%-60% of an employee’s annual salary.

However, employee turnover isn’t necessarily a negative thing. If the high turnover is the consequence of the fact that poor performers are leaving a company, it can actually be a good thing. It can mean that your company is keeping only A-players, not wasting time and money on poor performers, which is definitely a good thing.

Myth #2: Employee turnover is a normal thing and can’t be prevented

You might think that an employee turnover is a normal common process that happens in all companies. Especially in the last few years when the unemployment rates are lower than ever and candidates are in demand. However, this is only partially correct.

Work Institute estimated that 42 million, or one in four, employees will leave their jobs in 2018. Work Institute has also found that nearly 77 percent, or three-fourths, of that turnover, could be prevented by employers. Their 2018 Retention Report revealed the 50 most important reasons employees decided to leave their jobs and grouped them into 10 categories, seven of which are considered more preventable by employers.

Myth #3: Most employees leave because of money

You might think that it is only common sense that your employees leave because they have been offered a larger salary by some of your competitors. A salary that big that you can’t compete with it. However, your assumption is probably wrong, according to Work Institute.

Work Institute has found that the top five categories of reasons employees leave their jobs are:

  • Career Development – No opportunity to grow in a preferred job and career. (21%)
  • Work-Life Balance – Better work-life balance, which includes more favorable schedules, shorter commute times and scheduling flexibility. (13%)
  • Manager Behavior – Unprofessional or unsupportive managers. (11%)
  • Well-Being – Personal or family health issues. (9%)
  • Compensation and Benefits – Pay was cited more often than benefits. (9%).

So there you have it. Now you know the truth. Are you ready to calculate your own employee turnover rate for 2018?