New ServiceNow Research Highlights What Employees Really Want

Perks at work have become a source of pride and a competitive differentiator for companies vying for top talent. Stocked fridges, catered meals, on‑site fitness facilities, laundry services and complimentary transportation are just a handful of popular perks companies offer to lure new employees. But according to new research by ServiceNow, an effective way to build an engaged and productive workforce is giving employees a better employee service experience during big moments and even small ones in between.

ServiceNow’s “The Employee Experience Imperative” Report, which studies the service experience at work, reveals that employee enthusiasm for work peaks at the start of a new job, but wanes by 22% shortly thereafter. Where are employers missing the mark? The findings tell us that employers aren’t supporting employee’s basic needs on a day‑to‑day basis during the employee lifecycle: 41% still struggle to obtain information and answers to basic questions, like finding a company policy or resolving an issue with their equipment. Furthermore, only 41% believe their employers make it easy to select their equipment before their first day and only 51% of employees believe their employers make it easy to receive equipment necessary to perform their job responsibilities at the onset of their job.

Employees today – regardless of their role or generation – want to be heard and valued, and they want an employee experience that suits their needs throughout their career with an organization,” said Pat Wadors, Chief Talent Officer at ServiceNow. “If an employee’s experience is lacking at the onset of their new job, the impact for some employees can likely be felt until the employee’s last day. By creating beautiful and meaningful experiences and an environment where work gets done efficiently, employers will benefit from a more engaged and productive workforce.”

Pat Wadors, Chief Talent Officer, ServiceNow
Pat Wadors, Chief Talent Officer at ServiceNow

Where Can Employers Improve? Mobile Work Experiences

One‑third of our lives is spent at work. And, employees want their experiences at work to be more like their experiences at home – like having mobile technology at their fingertips to make finding information and accomplishing tasks simple, easy and convenient. In fact, more than half (54%) of employees expect their employers to offer mobile‑optimized tools at work. Yet, the majority (67%) report not finding it easy to complete necessary paperwork on a mobile device before their first day and only about half (52%) of employees have been allowed to use a smartphone or tablet to access employee tools from HR or other departments. However, those who do have such access self‑report higher productivity than those without these mobility tools. This is a miss for employers who haven’t yet introduced mobile self‑service to their workforce, especially for those aiming to retain and attract millennials, as over half (59%) expect employers to provide mobile‑optimized tools.

A Generation Gap? It’s Smaller at Work Than You’d Think

Baby boomers and millennials aren’t so different at work, after all. Across the four generations that comprise today’s workforce – baby boomers, Gen‑Zs, millennials and Gen‑Xs – employees want a better experience at work. The research found that, across generations and departments, employees are losing faith in their employers to deliver positive employee experiences:

  • Less than half (48%) of employees believe that employers are invested in improving the employee experience;
  • More than half (61%) of employees rate their employers poorly based on a negative experience with personal leave;
  • Less than half (45%) of employees feel that their opinions and perspective matter to their employer. However, millennials (43%) are more optimistic that employers will address feedback when compared to baby boomers (35%);
  • Only 37% of employees believe that employers automate processes to improve the worker experience; and
  • Less than half (44%) of employees believe employers provide them with easy access to information from HR and other departments; the same number felt they did not have access to the information vital to their job on day one.

A positive experience at work strongly correlates high employee net promoter scores (eNPS)– meaning, employees that create great employee experiences are likely to have more loyal, satisfied employees. That’s real business value.

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Guarantee Employee Job Satisfaction with Digital Workflows

Author: Chris Pope, VP Innovation, ServiceNow

The idea that company employees discuss and share their inner musings on corporate secrets when standing around the water cooler is probably more down to the movies than it is related to any form of reality. But if people are talking at work, one of the up-and-coming topics these days is their workflow—or lack of it.

Regardless of whether people talk at the water cooler, the tea station, or while queuing for lunch, we all discuss our working life experiences with each other in an informal way. It’s a sort of supplement―or you might say antidote—to human resources. And it’s where the crux of working lives is really played out.

So, in an increasingly connected and digitized world, may I suggest that the thread of water cooler conversations might be shifting slightly? Armed with new tools to transform the way many company processes are being carried out, people may now actually start discussing the state of their digital workflows and measuring their job satisfaction as a result.

A new yardstick for job satisfaction

People are now looking at the way work really gets done inside their organization in a far more granular and analytical way. Regardless of whether or not an individual is fully aware and cognizant of the digital workflow that their role may fall into, they are probably in one, nonetheless.

What everyone will know, instinctively, is that there is a flow of work between customers, partners and other members of an organization. What we can do with digital workflows is more accurately locate areas where work can be carried out more efficiently.

More than ever before we also know that people have more choice about the technology they use every day. We’ve witnessed the rise of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) to work and the general consumerization of IT that came with it.

These experiences should tell us that if you don’t give people the right tools, then they will go and look for them. Equally, if you don’t give people the right applications, engagement systems and wider workflow patterns, then they will instinctively go and look for them, or make them.

Unrestrained innovation in a digitally native territory

The shift to digital business brings with it new opportunities. Non-techie business people are starting to embrace so called low-code software application development platforms that allow them to build elements of app functionality that work just the way they want them to.

As these new freedoms play out in the workplace, firms need to think about the unknown factors. Unbridled and unrestrained innovation is all very well, but the problem with custom-built point solutions is that they often do one thing well, but fail to provide scope for enterprise-wide scalability or an ability to integrate across the entire organisation.

If we think about platform-level technologies, we can build that innovation factor into software that is digitally native to the cloud era and so ready for a more structured approach. Because these applications have been built in a digitally native territory, they will be able to leverage fully integrated native device capabilities, such as maps, camera, and so on.

The virtuous circle of workflows

If we hinge our business models around digital workflows that define what data lives where, then we can more easily react to change and uncover new streams of profitable operation. Digitizing workflows means we can use defined data where it has the right impact, but also channel unstructured data to the data lake.

But even the information in the data lake need not go to waste―we can apply Machine Learning (ML) to these data resources and use algorithms to find patterns in business transactions where we weren’t even looking for them to drive new business outcomes. This can be a virtuous circle because workflows can be tuned and changed based upon the new insights uncovered.

The business process you didn’t know about

The best work processes are very often the ones that you follow, but that you didn’t even know about. If we define digital workflows and build our operational models around them, then we can increase productivity and create great experiences for employees who want to work anywhere and at any time.

A lot of employees have to take actions throughout the day that move the organization forward, but often these same actions prevent them from doing high-value work. It’s time to transform old, manual ways of working into modern digital workflows, so employees and customers get what they need, when they need it.

Create a joined-up experience

Kicking off digital workflow initiatives and getting your transformation started can be a real challenge and as a result, many companies struggle to even start their efforts. First of all, we all have disjointed internal systems and processes that make it hard to connect the dots. Trying to navigate these can feel like unravelling a ball of yarn, so the more you learn, the more complicated they seem.

Once you make sense of the systems and processes, you have to figure out the myriad tools and solutions that drive these. The end result you should be aiming for is a common, workflow-driven experience layer that is consistent across the systems in your organization.

Your typical company employee might still be more likely to discuss holiday plans, managerial peeves and whether or not the associate in accounts is being a pain about expense reports, but the water cooler conversation around ‘how is your workflow?’, is coming. Are you digitally hydrated yet?

About the author

Chris Pope - ServiceNow

As ServiceNow’s global VP of Innovation, Chris brings more than 15 years of C-level executive experience with leading technology solutions and platforms across Product Management and Strategy. Chris also has the rare, added-value, experience of having been a ServiceNow customer multiple times so he understands the client and the vendor perspectives on business transformation. Chris’ proven track record working at and with the largest organisations globally, has seen him recognised as a thought leader in process and methodology. He holds a Bachelors of Science degree in Electronic Engineering from De Montfort University in the UK, and is a well-published author and contributor to many leading digital publications and blogs.

8 Golden Rules for Giving Positive & Productive Feedback at Work

Learn how to give meaningful, positive and productive feedback at workplace!

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The importance of positive feedback at workplace

According to Gallup’s research, giving an effective positive feedback at workplace leads to higher employee engagement, productivity, improved retention and greater profitability. Thus, every manager should learn how to give meaningful positive feedback.

When employees are given positive feedback regularly, they feel recognized and valued and are thus more engaged. Giving a positive, stand alone feedback to employees also helps building workplace relationships. As a result, your employees are more loyal and stay with your company longer.

Thus, every manager that wants to build and lead a successful team should learn how to give effective positive feedback to employees. If you become a pro at giving a positive feedback, you have to learn the proven techniques for giving positive feedback.

Tips for giving meaningful and productive positive feedback

Most people think that giving positive feedback is simple. However, simply saying “Nice job!” isn’t enough. If you want to give a meaningful, productive feedback that will reinforce positive behavior, follow these 8 golden rules:

1. Your feedback should be genuine

Give positive feedback to your employees when you have a concrete reason. Be direct and honest.

2. Your feedback should be timely

Make sure that your feedback is timely, given in-the moment. When you see it, praise it!

3. Your feedback should be specific

Avoid giving vague praise and say exactly what your employee did that you find commendable. Your feedback should be crystal clear and to the point.

4. Your feedback should be focused on effort

Focus on your employees’ effort and behavior (what they do) rather than on their personality traits or talent (what they’re like).

5. Frame your feedback in bigger context

Frame your employees’ accomplishments in a bigger context. Explain the impact of their achievement on others and link it to your company’s bottom line.

6. Use the appropriate body language

Make sure to smile, keep an eye contact and use appropriate facial expressions and hand gestures.

7. Amplify your feedback with a gesture

Go for a walk in the nearby park, grab a coffee or a box of candies and celebrate!

8. Personalize your feedback

Tailor your positive feedback to each of your employees. Some might enjoy being in the spotlight, while others prefer private, one-on-one praise.

Learn more on delivering positive feedback at work

If you’re looking for more great tips on delivering positive feedback at work, check out: 8 Examples of Giving Positive Feedback to Employees.

 

The Case for a More Human Approach to AI

Author: Chris Pope, VP Innovation, ServiceNow

 

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is all about machines, obviously. Except it’s not. In truth, discussions surrounding AI may often centre around how competent, intuitive and contextually aware the machine brains we are building have become.

But really, AI is all about us―the humans—and how it can make our lives better.

There was a time, perhaps even inside the current decade, when AI tools and functions were still associated with the fanciful ‘talking computers’ that featured in many 1980s movies. It wasn’t that long ago that we considered AI as something of a ‘toy’ and its application in mission-critical enterprise applications was still somewhat laughable. Of course, now we take talking computers completely seriously. So much so that we’re equally focused on the proficiency of computer speech recognition.

 

Application of AI

But as far as we have come, we still need to look at the real world use cases of AI and ask how it can help us make our lives better. If we’re not applying AI to our human work experiences to examine and analyse where it can make those experiences greater, then what are we doing here in the first place?

The truth is, many enterprises large and small have been struggling with finding the appropriate use cases for new and emerging AI technologies. Companies need to find the workflows inside their business models that can benefit from AI. Only then can they start to architect towards turning those operational throughputs into truly digital workflows.

So how do we define AI-enabled digital workflow Nirvana and how do we get there?

Typically, the process starts with a technology audit and a process of assessment, quantification and qualification running throughout the IT stack in question. Individual business units will need to step back and identify their work problems and challenges as they look for the elements of their workflows that can be digitised.

Everybody across every line of business function will be involved―we need to crowdsource and collaborate to identify strategic areas of business operations that still exist as predominantly manual, accurately measurable and fundamentally repetitive.

These are the parts of business that represent liquid gold, i.e. once we tap the seam, we can channel these functions into AI-driven services that subsequently run as digital workflows. Individuals are liberated from drudgery, productivity is increased and employees have a greater experience—a new virtuous circle is established.

 

Practical examples

Think about a typical office. When people leave the company, we need to manage who has a key fob for access to the car park. This is a perfect example of the type of job that has typically been performed manually through the use of a spreadsheet. This is time consuming, error-prone and obviously creates security issues.

But it’s also (I hope obviously) a perfect example of the type of task we can evolve to become a digital workflow driven by intelligence stemming from AI. Our analytics engine should know that an employee is leaving the firm and so reports, alerts, emails and perhaps even mobile device management, to cancel the key fob, can all happen automatically.

If we can make all those things smarter and more intuitive, then we can build better experiences faster.

Uber hasn’t actually done anything fundamental to change the way taxis work or drive. It has changed the digital workflow that governs the ability to book and pay for the service. The list of services-centric examples in this space is growing every day.

 

Automating a bad process doesn’t make it good

In the technology industry, we are often bad when it comes to decommissioning things. Think about how many business processes probably exist today that firms need to eradicate and get rid of.

There’s no point in applying AI to these aspects of the business. As we know, automating a bad process doesn’t make it a good process; it just makes it an automated bad process! So, this re-engineering is actually an opportunity to clean out your cupboard and stop doing the things that you no longer need to do.

An example that came out of a recent hackathon, we conducted, is a tool to help with filing of patents. One of our hackathon teams used AI and ML to trawl the web for all registered patents using word recognition. They wanted to identify connected words to see if a new invention already existed in some form already. This would have been costly manual work, that may have been handed over to a specialist (in this case, a patent lawyer), but now we can digitise these aspects of the business.

 

The human factor baseline

We as humans now need to engineer the existence of AI into our own mindsets and consider how it can help us work differently. This includes knowing what things we don’t need to worry about anymore. For example, we don’t take a map out with us these days, because we use a smartphone—so what else can we stop doing?

As we move down the more humanised road to AI, we will find that AI itself gets smarter as it learns our behavioural patterns, penchants and preferences. We must still be able to apply an element of human judgement where and when we want to, but that’s already part of the current development process as we learn to apply AI in balance when and where it makes sense.

The future of AI is smarter, and it is also more human. The end result is more digital at the core, but more human on the surface. If that still sounds like a paradox, then it shouldn’t. We’re at a crucial point of fusion between people and machines and it’s going to be a great experience.

 

About the Author

Chris Pope - ServiceNow

As ServiceNow’s global VP of Innovation, Chris brings more than 15 years of C-level executive experience with leading technology solutions and platforms across Product Management and Strategy. Chris also has the rare, added-value, experience of having been a ServiceNow customer multiple times so he understands the client and the vendor perspectives on business transformation. Chris’ proven track record working at and with the largest organisations globally, has seen him recognised as a thought leader in process and methodology. He holds a Bachelors of Science degree in Electronic Engineering from De Montfort University in the UK, and is a well-published author and contributor to many leading digital publications and blogs.

Company culture: Lessons from Apple, Virgin and Airbnb

Learn valuable lessons on creating positive company culture from leading companies such as Apple, Virgin and Airbnb!

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Great company culture: The key to business success and growth

Great company culture is the secret behind the growth and success of the most successful companies in the world. Company culture is an incredibly important ingredient of the ‘successful business’ recipe.

Take companies such as Apple, Airbnb and Virgin for example. All of these companies are well aware of the importance of fostering a positive, encouraging company culture. They know that having a great company culture can help them attract and retain top talent and foster innovation which gives them a competitive advantage.

This is why they work hard to build and promote a winning company culture. What can we learn from these crazy successful companies and how they view and foster company culture?

Company culture lessons from Apple, Airbnb and Virgin

Here are some valuable lessons on fostering a positive, encouraging company culture from the successful companies such as Apple, Airbnb and Virgin:

Lesson #1: Why is a company culture so important?

“Corporate culture is the only sustainable competitive advantage that is completely within the control of the entrepreneur.”

–  David Cummings, Co-Founder of Pardot

Lesson #2: How to build a great company culture?

“There’s no magic formula for great company culture. The key is just to treat your staff how you would like to be treated.”

– Richard Branson, Founder of Virgin Group

Lesson #3: Company culture spreads from the top

“There is tremendous teamwork at the top of the company which filters down the teamwork through out of the company.”

– Steve Jobs, Chairman, CEO and co-founder of Apple

Lesson #4: Company culture is the key to innovation

“A company’s culture is the foundation for future innovation.”

– Brian Chesky, Co-founder and CEO of Airbnb

Lesson #5: Make sure you company culture is authentic

“In this ever-changing society, the most powerful and enduring brands are built from the heart. They are real and sustainable. Their foundations are stronger because they are built with the strength of the human spirit, not an ad campaign. The companies that are lasting are those that are authentic.”

Howard Schultz, CEO, Starbucks

Lesson #6: Hire for cultural fit

“Shaping your culture is more than half done when you hire your team.”

– Jessica Herrin, Founder, Stella & Dot

Lesson #7: Never underestimate the power of company culture

“Culture eats strategy for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.”

– Peter Drucker, Management Guru

Looking for more workplace quotes?

If you’re looking for more inspiring and motivational workplace related quotes, check out:

Teamwork: Lessons from Apple, Yahoo and LinkedIn

Learn valuable lessons on teamwork from leading companies such as Apple, Yahoo and LinkedIn!

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Effective teamwork: The key to success and growth

Effective teamwork is the secret behind the growth and success of the most successful companies in the world. Teamwork is an incredibly important ingredient of the ‘successful business’ recipe.

Take companies such as Apple, Yahoo and LinkedIn for example. All of these companies are well aware of the importance of teamwork. They work hard to promote teamwork and encourage collaboration among their employees.

What can we learn from these crazy successful companies and how they view and foster teamwork?

Lessons on teamwork from Apple, Yahoo and LinkedIn

Here are some valuable lessons on teamwork from Apple, Yahoo and LinkedIn:

Lesson #1: Highlight the importance of teamwork

“Great things in business are never done by one person; they’re done by a team of people.”

– Steve Jobs, Chairman, CEO and co-founder of Apple

“No matter how brilliant your mind or strategy, if you’re playing a solo game, you’ll always lose out to a team.”

– Reid Hoffman, Co-founder and former executive chairman of LinkedIn

Key takeaway: Make teamwork one of your key companies values and continually work on promoting it.

Lesson #2: Teamwork starts at the top

“There is tremendous teamwork at the top of the company which filters down the teamwork through out of the company.”

– Steve Jobs, Chairman, CEO and co-founder of Apple

Key takeaway: Teamwork starts at the top and filters down through every layer of your company. If you want your employees to foster team collaboration, model it form top.

Lesson #3: Trust is the key

“Teamwork is dependent on trusting the other folks to come through with their part without watching them all the time.”

– Steve Jobs, Chairman, CEO and co-founder of Apple

Key takeaway: Hire the best people and trust them to do their job. Team members will hold each other accountable.

Lesson #4: Teamwork leads to innovation

“When you need to innovate, you need collaboration.”

– Marissa Mayer, Former president and chief executive officer of Yahoo!

Key takeaway: If you want to find a new, creative solution for a certain problem, bring (different) people together. Diversity leads to innovation.

Lesson #5: Teamwork is a process

“Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.”

– Henry Ford, Founder of Ford Motor Company

Key takeaway: Teamwork is a continuous process. Team members must learn how to successfully communicate and work together.  

➡️ If you’re looking for more great tips on managing employees, check out our Short Leaderships Tips for Managers!

 

These 5 Statistics Reveal the Real Truth About Employee Recognition

Employee recognition is a very effective method for improving employee motivation, engagement, productivity and job satisfaction. It’s a fact.

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The truth about employee recognition

In a time of war for talent, employees have the power to choose their employer. Losing your top talent to your competitors can be detrimental for your business.

This is why many employers invest a lot of time, money and effort to improve their employee experience. They are doing their best to keep their employees happy and satisfied. For example, most companies these days try to provide fancy perks and benefits, implement an employee wellness program, etc.

But the question is how effective are all of their efforts? What do employees really care about?

Is it really true that a simple act of saying praise to your employees can improve your company’s bottom line by keeping your best employees?

I won’t say a word. The following statistics speak for themselves.

Top 5 employee recognition statistics

Statistic #1: Half of the U.S. employees are unsatisfied with their job

The Conference Board’s latest survey on job satisfaction has found that only 51% of employees feel overall satisfied with their job. This survey gauged approximately 1,500 employed individuals, who together comprise a snapshot of the U.S. workforce.

Statistic #2: Half of the U.S. employees are considering a new job

Half of U.S. employees are watching the job market or actively looking for a job, based on findings from a new Gallup Workforce Panel study. Results are based on a Gallup Panel Web study completed by 13,008 U.S. adults who are demographically representative of the U.S. adult population.

Statistic #3: The main reason why employees leave their jobs is a lack of recognition

The main reasons why employees leave their jobs is that they don’t feel appreciated, according to Gallup’ research.

Statistic #4: Employees aren’t recognized (enough) for their work

According to Gallup’s analysis, only one in three workers in the U.S. strongly agree that they received recognition or praise for doing good work in the past seven days.

Even more, Gallup Poll shows that 65% of employees haven’t received any form of recognition for good work in the last year!

Statistic #5: Employees want praise, not money

According to Officevibe’s recent study, 82% of employees think it’s better to give someone praise than a gift.

In a recent Gallup workplace survey, employees were asked what types of recognition were the most memorable for them. Respondents emphasized 5 methods in particular – and money isn’t the only (or the top) form of recognition employees prefer. Most employees prefer employee recognition in the form of:

  1. Public recognition or acknowledgment via an award or a certificate
  2. Private recognition from a boss, peer or customer
  3. Receiving or obtaining a high level of achievement through evaluations or reviews
  4. Promotion or increase in the scope of work or responsibility to show trust
  5. Monetary awards such as a trip, prize or pay increase

Bonus statistic: High cost of turnover

Total costs associated with a turnover range from 90% to 200% of an employee’s annual salary, according to a report from the Center for American Progress.

5 Workplace Wellness Statistics You Should Know About

Workplace wellness programs: Yay or nay? Discover the data-based answer!

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Workplace wellness programs: A growing workplace trend

Workplace wellness programs are getting more and more popular. This new workplace trend has gained a lot of attention recently and stirred quite a debate.

Some argue that companies should not be burdened by taking care of their employees’ health. On the other hand, there are voices arguing that in today’s modern world, these programs are becoming a necessity.

Above all, there are questions about the effectiveness and ROI of these programs. To answer these questions, we dug deep into research.

Top 5 workplace wellness statistics

Workplace wellness statistic #1

According to research conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management, 75% of employers indicated that their companies offered some type of a wellness program, resource or service to employees.

Workplace wellness statistic #2

A comprehensive review of the literature has found that the average return on investment of workplace wellness programs is 3.27. This means that for every dollar that was spent on the program the company saved $3.27 because of reduced healthcare costs.

Workplace wellness statistic #3

A new survey by Virgin HealthMiles Inc. and Workforce Management Magazine found that an overwhelming 77% of employees think that employee wellness programs positively impact the company culture.

Workplace wellness statistic #4

Research suggests that employers save on average $5.82 in lower absenteeism costs for every dollar spent on employee wellness programs.

Workplace wellness statistic #5

The Virgin HealthMiles/Workforce survey found that about 87% of employees said they consider health and wellness offerings when choosing an employer.

Conclusion

Research has shown that workplace wellness programs have proven benefits, both for employers and employees. Employee wellness programs can do much more than just keep your employees healthy.

These programs can help you improve your company culture, reduce absenteeism, attract talent and even save money!

 

3 Secrets to Reducing Your Employee Churn Rate

Reduce your employee churn rate with these tips.

Replacing an employee can cost as much as 20% of their yearly salary. The higher up their position is, the more expensive it is. That’s because you need to factor in paying recruitment agencies, covering for the vacant position, and the time lost to those responsible for hiring.

A low employee churn rate is key to maximizing your potential and growth.

When you have a lower employee turnover, you can focus your resources on researching and launching new products and services, improving the working environment, and investing in employees’ development instead.

It also boosts your employer brand, which is crucial if you want to win the war for talent. Brands with a strong employer brand lower their cost to hire by 43%.

But how do you reduce your churn rate?

It starts by looking at the employee journey. How can you improve it? What steps can you make to create a more inviting atmosphere for employees whether they’ve been there five weeks or five years?

Let’s take a look at three important parts of an employee’s journey, and how small changes to them can reduce your employee turnover rate.

Plan your onboarding process for early success

Happy employees are loyal employees. To create this sense of loyalty, you need to make them feel valued. This starts from their very first day.

However, not every company manages this – 42% of employees have no computer or device to work from on their first day. Worse, some employees don’t even have a desk on their first day! While this is only part of the onboarding process, it’s an important part of setting your employee up for success, especially when 20% of employees leave within the first 45 days.

Contrast that to the 69% that will still be with a company three years later if they go through a positive onboarding process, and you can see why a good onboarding process is so important.

A negative experience reflects badly on you: it makes you look disorganized, and like you don’t value your employees.

It’s therefore imperative that you you spend time planning the onboarding process for your new employee before they start. Don’t leave it all until the last minute, as you may find that there are some issues – like purchasing new equipment – that will take days, maybe even weeks, to sort.

Also ensure that their company account and logins for any relevant software are set up before they begin. That way, all they need to do on their first day is click to activate their new account. They can then start using the software straight away.

Once they’re all set up, don’t just sit them down and present them with a list of objectives. Include them in the decision-making process. Have some projects ready for them to work on, but listen to them and ask them what they’d most like to work on, too. That way, they immediately feel like their thoughts and opinions are valued.

The objective of an onboarding process is to help the employee get to know the company, its products, and mostly importantly, the culture and their colleagues.

Everyone in the team should be involved in making the new team member feel welcome. This could include scheduling introduction meetings with the new starter, or assigning them a buddy to give them a tour and answer any day-to-day questions.

Group inductions can be intimidating for new starters, so focus on one-to-one sessions instead. This creates more space for the new hire to ask questions.

Efficient scheduling solutions make organizing these one-to-one meetings a breeze, and avoids the risk of two member scheduling a meeting at the same time. Scheduling meetings before someone starts also reduces any awkwardness over the new hire having to approach people to schedule meetings – it’s all there ready for them when they first start.

Invest in training and mentorship

Training and mentorship are crucial parts of an employee’s progress. They can boost their skills and help them to work out which career path is for them.

For mentors and those conducting training, it reinforces their skills. They can even learn from those that they teach. It’s also great networking for everyone – you never know where your next great opportunity will come from.

Despite this, only 44% of companies offer a mentorship scheme.

Mentorship benefits employees at every stage of their journey. Don’t let the fact that someone is already a manager convince you that they already know everything they need to know. No matter how long someone has been managing for, there’s always a new strategy or technique they can try to motivate their team.

Training can be both internal and external, so be open-minded about the best place(s) for employees to build their skills. The best person to train your marketing team may not be someone who’s been there for years – it may be someone who can offer a fresh perspective on your strategy and help you to keep it relevant as algorithms continue to change.

Conduct exit interviews

Exit interviews are an often overlooked but incredibly valuable part of an employee’s journey. They give you the opportunity to examine why employees leave, and identify areas where your company may be failing them. Without this information, you can’t make positive changes to improve the working environment.

Conducting exit interviews using a framework makes it easier for you to quantify results. You can then pick up on reoccurring problems or praise. The more often something is raised, the more important it is to address.

Some questions you could ask include:

  • How employees feel about the working environment
  • What their commute is like
  • What their relationship is like with their manager
  • How well they get on/work with their team

Using this information, you can start discussions with remaining team members about any common threads. You can then make informed decisions about how to better suit employees’ needs and (hopefully) prevent more from leaving for the same or similar reasons.

You can also home in on positive comments that are made, finding ways to further enhance these experiences. For instance, if employees benefit from flexible working hours, you could look into allowing them to work from home if they can’t already. If they like how the team encourages self-development, you could look into courses or events for the team to further develop their skills.

Employees are your business’s biggest – and best – advocates. If they share negative experiences with their social circle it reflects badly on you and may even cause you to lose customers. Leaving them with a positive overall feeling is therefore crucial. Exit interviews are just one part of this. Others include how the rest of the team reacts to their departure, handover periods, and anything else that happens on their final day. While you can’t control all of this, exit interviews help to cement your positive employer brand by showing employees that you care about their wellbeing from the start of their journey with you right through to the end.

When an employee speaks highly of you when they leave, they’re more likely to return for a future position, or even to recommend roles to their friends and family. Since referrals are one of the best ways to hire the right person for the job, this can make a huge difference to your hiring process, and further improving your employer brand.

Conclusion

It’s your responsibility to offer employees opportunities to learn, grow, and be more efficient in their role. Employees will then be more loyal and motivated, and turnover will decrease.

It’s also important to remember that there are many other elements that can impact employee satisfaction. Internal promotions, 360 feedback, and open communications are also key to reducing employee turnover. And don’t forget to make the technology that they need available to them!

These investments and changes to company culture make a big difference. After all, reducing your employee churn rate can be the difference between business growth and stagnation.

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Source: 3 Secrets to Reducing Your Employee Churn Rate | The Cronofy Blog

The Human Side of HR: What Makes a Great Administrator?

Businesses are made up of a multitude of working parts. From upper management down to the mailroom, everyone has a vital role to play. HR managers are an essential part of maintaining a well-oiled machine; they take care of the people who work there and maintain the kind of workplace that inspires people to turn up day after day, year after year. They are the people behind the people. In order to do their jobs effectively, HR managers need to have a variety of skills in their toolbox.

Hire the Right People

Hiring is a major part of HR responsibilities. It’s important to hire the right people; you want them to be engaged, capable, and in possession of a skillset that compliments the current work goals and progress. An experienced HR manager needs to know how to hire the kind of person who fits the company culture and values, and who will assist in reaching long-term goals as well as immediate needs. The wrong person, or hiring a good employee for the wrong position, can be detrimental. The right person can not only fit into your corporate culture but can help that culture grow along with the business.

Effective Training

A good hiring manager can recruit employees with all the skills required to shape the company’s ability to succeed, but they also need to help mold the employee’s skill set into their brand and workflow through comprehensive and effective training. An employee with a wealth of talent needs to know how to apply that talent, not just for best results but also in compliance with legal and labor laws. A thorough training regimen outlines expectations, any company-specific training, as well as what the employee can expect from the company. This communication is vital to ensuring everyone, including the company, can comfortably fulfill their expectations.

Employee Retention and Satisfaction

The link between employee engagement and revenue is well-established. A skillful HR manager is the cornerstone of employee satisfaction — and employee satisfaction is the key to engagement. HR can utilize programs designed to show appreciation for employee work; anything from food to incentive programs can energize employees. Likewise, public praise and spotlighting distinguished employees as well as a culture of positive reinforcement can be effective. HR must also stay on top of employee needs, whether it be in benefits offerings or promotion and salaries. Employees should feel needed, appreciated, and like they have something to work towards.  

Conflict Resolution

One of the more complicated aspects of HR is conflict resolution. An effective HR manager should be patient, even-tempered and able to navigate employee interpersonal and professional relationships (as they apply to the job) with a delicate touch. HR should be attuned not only to the needs of the company but of the employees as they apply to a productive and effective workplace. Conflict resolution can range from small interpersonal spats to the larger legal issues, such as sexual harassment. It is important that HR managers be thoroughly educated and knowledgeable about conflicts of a legal nature, for the safekeeping of both employees and the company.  

Follow Through

Your employees rely on you to make sure their work lives run smoothly. From benefits to paychecks, they need you to make sure the company fulfils their end of the employee contract. Prompt follow-through shows your employees their well-being is important and the company is invested in making sure they are in a safe, productive atmosphere. If employees do not trust HR, they’ll be less likely to seek out solutions to any problems from HR. They will be more likely to become bitter or malcontent, grow stagnant in terms of work or look for employment elsewhere.

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An HR manager who utilizes these skills will be able to work effectively and harmoniously with their company and workforce. Their administration skills can help boost productivity and make the workplace somewhere employees look forward to turning up for a long, happy future.