Is it possible to make a career out of trading?

Nowadays, there are various investment opportunities that people can explore, in order to maximize their profits or secure additional funds for other long-term goals. It goes without saying that the stock exchange market is the most popular destination for both experienced investors and newcomers alike. The main reason is that the stock market is quite stable and highly regulated trading platform.

In addition, it’s also rarely volatile but it does heavily rely on the global economic and geopolitical stability. Many people avoided investing as a form of a career because up until recently, the stock market was considered a barrier-to-entry area. In other words, there were difficult obstacles standing in the way and preventing competitors from entering an industry with ease.

However, modern technology and modern solutions have reshaped even the trade industry, making this area easily accessible to anyone willing to commit to trading regardless of their initial capital. To put things into perspective, it’s possible to make a living from trading but it’s never as easy as it may seem. Therefore, here are a few things you should know if you decide to make a career out of trading.

What does stock trade mean?

As you may already know, investing in stock means buying a small percentage, also called a share of a company which includes all of their equity and assets. The price of stocks is determined by a company’s overall performance on the market. The main reason companies offer their shares on the market is to raise money and spread the risk of ownership to a group of shareholders.

Now, when you acquire shares of a company you are considered a shareholder. You can sell your shares if the price suits you or buy more if the price is low. Moreover, you can hold on to your stocks and enjoy a dividend income. Nowadays, anyone can buy and sell stocks, as long as they have the initial capital. Furthermore, you can engage in trading even if you have a family at home you must commit to. Strategies, such as day trading can be adjusted to your personal life.

What’s required for stock trade?

Aside from capital, you’ll need to sign up with a broker, in order to start trading, unless, of course, you want to become a broker yourself. A broker will buy or sell assets on the behalf of a client or a company that employed them. A broker must also perform analysis on investments, in order to secure a deal that will suit their client’s needs. On the other hand, you can become an independent trader and focus your investment solely on personal gains.

However, in order to become a successful trader, you have to understand well how the market operates and what’s involved. Moreover, you have to be able to devise good strategies on the go and ensure you don’t lose your investment. The fact of the matter is that there are always risks involved when it comes to trade. A good trader knows how to minimize, as well as mitigate those risks.

Identify good opportunities

The key to successful trading lies in spotting a good opportunity and capitalizing on it. It sounds much easier than it actually is, to be frank. There are a lot of companies on the stock market and not every one of them is bound to ensure long-term success. The fact of the matter is that you cannot predict how a company will perform, you can only estimate their performance at best.

However, jumping on the opportunity, while it’s still good has a good chance of yielding a return on investment (ROI). In order to achieve that, you must familiarize yourself with the market and conduct constant research. That way you’ll also familiarize yourself with the use and the demand for resources, as well as be able to spot companies with good growth potential.

Even the most specialized industries are looking towards the future by implementing technology and digital opportunities for its customers, resulting in long term success and a good investment opportunity. As an example, a division of Schlumberger Technology Corporation called Hexacom launched an e-commerce platform last year where oilfield professionals can get everything from tubulars to drill collars.

In any event, opting for a good opportunity will depend on your investment goals, such as short-term, mid-term or long-term goals.

Portfolio diversification

As you’re probably aware by now, any type of trade has risks involved. Becoming a good investor means learning to be flexible around those risks. That’s why many experienced investors always diversify their investment portfolio. Diversification means investing in other opportunities, instead of focusing on a single one. If you’ve made profits from stock investments, you can consider investing in other methods as well. For instance, you can invest in mutual funds, ETFs, bonds and so on.

Also, you can consider alternative investment types, such as precious metals, real estate, antiques etc. The purpose of this strategy is to secure your wealth, as well as minimize the risk of your investments. In other words, if you have multiple investments at once you can easily recover if your stock deal, for example, doesn’t turn out as expected. Simply put, investment portfolio diversification is there to ensure you don’t lose all of your money on a single investment deal that went bad.

Forex market (FX)

Another market aside from stocks, you can explore is the foreign exchange market or Forex. FX is similar to the stock market but FX deals in currencies. That being said, over 4 trillion dollars worth of currencies are traded on the market each day. That makes the Forex market one of the most liquid trading platforms in the world. Currencies are traded in pairs and there are a lot of strategies to explore that can get help you turn a quick profit.

However, 96% of new traders fail at their first attempt at currency trade. The main reason is that the FX market is primarily designed for insiders who understand the market trends well. Still, if you lack the experience in trading currencies, you don’t have to start risking your own money straight away. As a matter of fact, you can create a demo account and try out different strategies with virtual money but in real-time scenarios. That way you can build up experience until you’re comfortable enough to trade with real money.

Cryptocurrencies

Another form of trade worth exploring is cryptocurrencies. This trend has grown in popularity ever since the first cryptocurrency Bitcoin had emerged back in 2009. Ever since then, there’s been a huge development in the crypto market that now favors over a thousand different offerings, whether in coins or in tokens. The purpose behind cryptocurrencies was to create a trading platform that’s independent of any government imposed regulations and without the middleman like central banks.

That’s why the technology behind cryptocurrencies also known as blockchain was developed to act as a decentralized publicly edger that will record peer-to-peer transactions. However, the fact that it’s unregulated makes the crypto market a very high-risk market. Extreme volatility and instability may prove to be too risky for investors. If you’re new to the whole trading concept, you might consider less risky options before you move to cryptocurrencies. The main reason is that in time, the crypto market will undoubtedly stabilize. But until then, the crypto market is reserved for the bold.

 

Trading in assets and making investments can be a great opportunity to maximize profits and gain a significant ROI. To answer the question at hand, it is very much possible to make a career out of trade alone. However, don’t leave your day job until you learn the ropes first. Needless to say, with careful research and good planning, you can make your investments worthwhile.

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Q & A with David Green | The HR Tech Weekly®

People Analytics Is Core to the Future of the HR Function: Q&A with David Green

People Analytics Is Core to the Future of the HR Function

Today our guest is David Green, a true globally respected and award winning writer, speaker, conference chair and executive consultant on people analytics, data-driven HR and the future of work.

David is the Global Director, People Analytics Solutions at IBM Watson Talent. He is also the longstanding Chair, of the Tucana People Analytics conference series, the next edition of which – the People Analytics Forum, takes place in London on 29-30 November.

David has spoken at conferences and/or worked with people analytics leaders in over 20 cities in the past year including San Francisco, Sydney, London, Paris, Singapore, New York, Amsterdam, Moscow and Berlin. This affords David with a unique perspective and insight into what’s working, what’s not, and what’s forthcoming in the field of people analytics.

The interview is hosted by Alexey Mitkin, Founder, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief, The HR Tech Weekly® Online Media Co.

1. Hi David, and first of all thank you very much for this interview with The HR Tech Weekly®. The year of 2017 is approaching its end. What made a difference this year in the field of people management and HR technologies?

Thanks Alexey, it is a pleasure to speak with you. For me, 2017 has been a pivotal year in the field as the realisation that people analytics is core to the future of the HR function has become far more widespread. In one of his recent articles (see here), Josh Bersin described people analytics “as the lynchpin of success for HR in the next few years”, and I have to say I completely agree – although that probably doesn’t surprise you!

We still have some way to go in terms of widespread adoption and just as importantly in embedding analytics and data-driven decision making within organisational culture, but the acceptance that this is core rather than peripheral is a welcome momentum shift.

Elsewhere, the move from many companies to develop programs and technologies that personalise the candidate/employee experience in areas such as talent acquisition, onboarding, learning and mobility is also positive. It’s about time that we have rich and personalised experiences at work similar to those we already enjoy as consumers. Data and analytics plays a foundational role in this.

2. People analytics is an area of profound interest to business leaders. What do you see as the main trends in the people analytics space?

You are right to highlight the heightened interest levels in people analytics Alexey. I’d summarise the main trends as follows:

  • More and more organisations getting started with people analytics – 2017 seems to have been the year that the talking about when to start analytics stopped and the actual hard work in creating capability began for many organisations. So, the number of organisations in the early stages of their people analytics journeys is on the increase and many will face similar challenges in terms of data quality, skills and capabilities, stakeholder management/education and project prioritisation. Our recent IBM Smarter Workforce Institute research on HR Analytics Readiness in Europe demonstrated though that most organisations still have a long way to go.
  • Developing an analytical culture: this is key for organisations that want to develop sustainable capability in people analytics. This means exciting, equipping and enabling HR Business Partners, and clearly demonstrating and communicating the impact of people analytics initiatives within the organisation. This is the focus of many companies that have built initial capability and success in people analytics.
  • Ethics and privacy concerns: this continues to be the most important and challenging aspect for practitioners. Research from Insight222 reveals that 81% of people analytics projects are jeopardised by ethical and privacy concerns. With the EU GDPR legislation coming into effect in May 2018 and the emergence of new employee data sources, focus on this area will continue to be high.
  • The consumerisation of HR – as per my earlier point, many organisations that have developed people analytics capability are looking at ways to understand and improve the employee experience. In addition to the personalised machine-learning based technologies referenced earlier, this includes efforts to understand and analyse employee sentiment. You can’t do either of these things without analytics so those organisations that have already developed people analytics capability are in pole position to take advantage here.
  • Organisational network analysis (ONA) – interest in ONA has exploded in 2017 as organisations seek to better understand team effectiveness and productivity. Practitioners interested in this burgeoning area of people analytics should check out the work of Rob Cross, recent articles by Josh Bersin and vendors like TrustSphere, Humanyze and Worklytics. Expect interest in this area to continue to soar in 2018.

3. On the eve of People Analytics Forum 2017 could you slightly open the curtain on what makes an ideal agenda in modern HR analytics, workforce planning and employees insights then?

I always enjoy chairing the Tucana People Analytics World and People Analytics Forum events as the agenda is always cognisant of the fact that the diversity of delegates in terms of where they are with analytics varies widely. As such, the three tracks: Start (for those getting started), Grow (for those building capability and looking for deeper insight) and Advance (for advanced practitioners and those exploring new data sources) means there is something for everyone. This is hugely important as in my experience the people analytics community is highly collaborative and there is a mutual desire amongst practitioners for shared learning. The Tucana events provide this in spades.

4. It was heard that some attendees of conferences recently formed a viewpoint that the slow adoption of analytics has been because of a lack of practical cases delivered by speakers. Your point of view on the problem will be of great influence.

I haven’t really heard this viewpoint from many. I would argue the contrary in fact that most of the conferences I attend feature numerous and diverse case studies from practitioners. I think you need a balance of speakers from the practitioner, consultant, vendor and analyst communities as each provides a slightly different perspective – indeed much of the innovation in the space is coming from the vendor community. As such, at the conferences I chair, speak and attaned there is normally much to inspire delegates whatever their maturity level when it comes to people analytics. Of course, there is a distinction between being inspired and immitation as each organisation faces different business challenges and has unique cultures. If I could offer one piece of advice to practitioners, whatever their maturity level, it is to channel their efforts on the key business challenges that have the biggest impact within their organisations.

5. What new data-driven HR solutions are on your watchlist and why?

As I mentioned before much of the innovation in the people analytics space is coming from the vendor community and I always recommend to practitioners to keep abreast of the latest developments here. Data-driven companies to look at include: TrustSphere, Alderbrooke Group, Aspirant, Glint, Visier, Crunchr, Workometry, Peakon, OrgVue, Headstart, Worklytics, Humanyze, Qlearsite, One Model, hiQ Labs, Cultivate and StarLinks; and those are just the ones I can remember off the top of my head!

If you’ll forvive the self-promotion, I would like to add that IBM is also doing some groundbreaking work in this space through bringing Watson to HR, particularly in the talent acquisition and the employee experience areas – see more here.

6. What advice would you give to HR professionals looking to boost their careers within the people analytics space?

Well, firstly you should get yourself along to the People Analytics Forum and read my articles on LinkedIn!

Seriously, analytics is a core capability for the future HR practitioner and it won’t be long before the likes of CIPD and SHRM build this into their educational programs. Until then, find some courses (like the Wharton School course on Coursera), attend some conferences, read some books (like The Power of People and the Basic Principles of People Analytics), and seek to learn from analytics professionals both in and outside of HR.

For me, HR is one of the most exciting places in business to work in at the moment and the increased use of analytics and data-driven decision making is one of the reasons why I believe this to be the case.

Etiquette

Professional Etiquette For Jobseekers And Recruiters (Infographic)

Professional Etiquette for Jobseekers and Recruiters | Main Image

To be on your best behavior is always important, but good professional etiquette is more essential and more critical when one is looking for a job or a new talent for a company.

For job seekers, failing to create a positive and lasting impression during the initial assessment can hinder their chances of moving forward in the hiring process.

For recruiters, even the slightest mistake during the hiring process could cause them to potentially lose a valuable candidate.

Keeping up to date with the overwhelming amount of job search trends, hiring protocols and interview practices can be very stressful. Also, these trends may quickly change. In this infographic, we listed down the rules that will forever matter.  Rules that job seekers and recruiters have to keep in mind during the whole hiring process.

So, good professional etiquette is important during hiring process. Learn some rules that jobseekers and recruiters have to keep in mind with this infographic by Phil. Exeq Search Solutions.

Professional Etiquette for Jobseekers and Recruiters | Infographic by Phil. Exeq Search Solutions


Source: Professional Etiquette For Jobseekers And Recruiters (Infographic)

5 successful leaders' advice: I wish I knew this as a young manager

5 successful leaders’ advice: I wish I knew this as a young manager

young-man-thinking-and-working-with-laptop-in-office-space-picjumbo-com

Good leadership is an essential for any successful company, but it’s not always easy for junior or first-time managers to adapt to their role. Many times, leaders look back on their career and have a whole host of new insights and knowledge they wish they’d known all along.

When we started Impraise 3 years ago, the focus was on the product. As the company grew and we brought more people on board, we faced the challenges of also becoming first time leaders. Managing people for the first time, whilst challenging, was also rewarding, but it was always helpful hearing from people with more experience, and understanding what helped them progress and become the best leaders possible.

With recent failures at Uber showing many young leaders were neither trained or equipped for their roles, we wanted to find out just what people wish they’d known when they began on their leadership path. We talked to five top leaders to find out what they wish they’d known when they started their management careers, and collected their most valuable insights…

Harry WestFrog Design

“In an organization that’s fast moving, with lots of young people… we need to be proactive. We shouldn’t expect people to know how to manage without any training.”

CEO Harry West shares with us the things he’s learnt whilst managing the rapidly growing design company.

Historically, he shares, during the company’s earlier days, when potential future leaders were trained, there was a lack of knowledge and structure in place concerning the skills required and how they should be developed. The company now have in place a management training program to ensure these things are addressed before young leaders are put in charge of teams. Reflecting on earlier practices, he muses that this less than thought out approach to systematic training was not good enough for such a fast moving, young tech company. West soon learnt that this wasn’t working, and began reshaping their training process to be more systematic, now ensuring young leaders go into their positions equipped and confident.

Martin Jellema, Werkspot

“One of the most important elements is the people themselves.”

Martin Jellema, Werkspot & Instapro’s Chief Commercial Officer, responsible for a 70+ team, shares the top three lessons he’s learnt since he began managing.

Jellema maintains that, after all his years of managing people, one of the most important elements is the people themselves. Finding and recruiting candidates that fit the company and can handle every aspect of the role remains one of the most important aspects of managing.

Besides this, he maintains, asking for help where needed remains the second most important thing. He now values collaboration over feeling the pressure to perform flawlessly and prove yourself as manager, saying it’s more useful to discuss issues, allowing people to help you come up with solutions you wouldn’t necessarily think of. In Jellema’s experience, both your boss and your team will see you reaching out for help as a strength not a weakness: understanding that something needs to be done or changed and using the resources you have to make that positive change won’t be frowned upon. You have a great team around you for a reason: use their knowledge and skills! He also outlines the importance of keeping focus on ‘high leverage’ activities: rather than taking time on minor activities, delegate, and dedicate the time to things like team training which ups productivity.

Bob Kastner, Meeting Tomorrow

“If you have great team members, and you get them energized by a great scoreboard, then you’ll be unstoppable.”

Bob Kastner, Director of Marketing at Meeting Tomorrow shares the one thing he wishes he knew as a junior manager: how useful scoreboards are when it comes to keeping the team engaged, energized and on track.

Kaster says things should be easy to read at a glance. People should be able to tell what’s going on by looking at a few, important metrics: only use the ones that are essential to productivity. Kaster’s next must-do for these metrics is keep things constant: update the board as often as possible; keep information relevant and updated in real-time, and have it on display, keeping things in the forefronts of people’s minds, and discussing them regularly in team meetings or daily stand ups.

You can decide whether to create a competitive friendly vibe, seeing who tops the scoreboard, or create a collective vibe: how close is the team to hitting goals? Kaster has learnt to put this focus on striving for more motivating ‘best’ results rather than encouraging people to beat averages, always ensuring most importantly, to celebrate these successes as a team when they occur!

Brett Remington, Wisconsin Centre for Performance Excellence

“Trust holds everything together. It takes huge amounts of time to accumulate… As a manager, your success depends on the preservation and enhancement of trust.”

We spoke to Brett Remington, of the Wisconsin Centre for Performance Excellence,  and he outlined the things he’s learnt: his experience based ‘truths of management’.

Remington’s first learning was the importance of trust and fostering good relationships with those around you. He shares he’s also learnt to see managers as administrative functions, believing that “if you’re going into management because you want to change the face of what’s possible in your organization, you are applying for the wrong job.” The second, he says, is it’s essential to have a curiosity about the processes your team use: you could have a great team, but, if the processes being followed are ineffective, they’re going to be disengaged and unsuccessful.

He also sets a lot of store by keeping metrics simple and useful, and learnt to focus on 3-5 key performance metrics. He says attempting to stay on top of more than 5 performance measures at once makes for accomplishing less, whilst having focus on fewer than 3 at any time means you’ll likely miss opportunities for continuous improvement and innovation.

His next learning? Humility and the need to embrace change.

“You are only about 2/3rds as good at your job as you think. The 1/3rd you don’t know about, don’t believe, or don’t pay attention to is going to determine how long you’ve got left in this job. Find ways of eliminating blind spots and practice humility. Eventually, you may find that your role as manager is vastly different than when you started. People, processes, policies, and potential change. Know when the accumulated changes no longer fit with your skills, aspirations, or interests. When that time comes, be ready to change out of your manager role and reflect on what you have accomplished as you pursue a better future for yourself.” 

Barry Curry, Systeme

“Most importantly learning how to react and behave when you are out of your comfort zone will better prepare you for being out of it.”

Barry Curry, Technical Director at Systeme, also brings back the key point of positive feedback, recognition, and acknowledging your team for their accomplishments: it’s always key to ensure people know they’re valued.

He shared his biggest learnings with us, beginning with the importance of keeping sight of the big picture. It can be easy to get drawn into the small details: stay focused on key details, and don’t take things personally. If things become heated during stressful projects or periods, it’s okay to let people vent. Acknowledge people’s perspectives, never make responses personal and keep things respectful, with co-workers and clients alike.

He also suggests using goals to ensure what you’re doing has direction. This ensures that problem solving for others doesn’t totally overtake your other responsibilities. Another learning is resist the temptation to always check your emails first thing: first complete one of the daily tasks you’ve set yourself, without distraction or prioritising other’s needs.

He also says that although sometimes sharing problems is difficult, having thought about solutions before sharing the problem will show you’ve thought things through and instill confidence in you. Similarly, having a process in place for when unplanned or unexpected things arise is key: have a consistent process in place to help you deal with things more efficiently.

For more information and expert advice on becoming a great leader, check out our free eBook and white paper.


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Millennials Would be Wise to Embrace Work Limbo

Millennials Would be Wise to Embrace Work Limbo

Job transitions are going to become more and more prevalent as work evolves over the next several decades. Millennials should plan on embracing work limbo.

College to Job Transition: A Personal Story

College to Jobs can be Bumpy

Moving from College to the “Real World” can be Bumpy Ride

After graduating last May, I thought I had my entire future planned. It seemed so easy. Of course it took a lot of work and planning to get all of these things to happen, but I did it and I thought, “Well… I did it! This will be my life for the next two years or so”. I got an awesome full-time paid internship to come home to in Seattle. Then I put in a deposit for my first apartment. Life seemed all set-up and great!

However, soon I would be introduced to the real world; the reality of being a millennial, a young professional in an ever growing city. I would live the reality of the ebb and flow of work limbo that is prevalent today.

If you are a Millennial like me, I have one thing to say to you: get used to job transitions! Get used to feeling like you’re on a roller coaster for the next few years of your professional career! Further, get used to feeling a little out of control and in a state of ‘limbo’ during your adulthood in general.

It’s Going to be Okay

You will survive. I have gone through two job transitions in the past 7 months, three jobs if you count the internship I had right after graduation. When I left my first job, it was difficult not to be hard on myself. It really took a toll on my self esteem. But the thing that kept me going and made me persist was the knowledge that a job that would be better fit was in my future. My reason to leave the last job wasn’t because of my inability to adapt or work hard, it was just that the job didn’t align with my goals/aspirations. It was because the company wasn’t a good fit for me. Plain and simple. The tech industry wasn’t for me. I wasn’t passionate about it, and the company I worked for consisted of a tight knit group of senior recruiters who didn’t know how to train new grads. It just didn’t work out – and that is OKAY.

It’s hard not to feel discouraged and question your place in your profession when it seems like every place you go, something never works out. I’m not going to tell you that it’s been easy transitioning and I’m not going to lie when I say that I’ve doubted myself; but what I will tell you is that I have done self-reflection that has changed my life for the better. Also, the past 7 months have given me a great idea of what I do and don’t want in my next work environment. If you are transitioning… I promise it will be okay. More importantly, surround yourself with supportive individuals who will nourish and heal you throughout your transitions and self-examination. This will help you remain positive and keep you on your feet.

Be Yourself. Be Genuine

Be Genuine. Be Yourself

So important to stay genuine even when going through career limbo

Don’t lose who you are in transitions. My life is not as black and white as I thought it would be after graduation. My mindset was 50 years behind. Back in May, I planned my life to work like: get a job offer before graduation, get an apartment set up before graduation, stay at the job and get promotions for a few years. I’m sure a lot of people will chuckle at this naive mindset, trust me, now I do too. Of course, we all probably planned out a Utopian way of life such as this. You thought, “Hey, I’m a hard-working and creative individual. I’m willing to learn, and have valuable ideas! Who wouldn’t want to work with me?”

I can tell you right now that while all of those things might be true about you, everyone else thinks the same thing. Here’s the reality of this situation and here’s the real question: how will you stand out in a sea of millennials who see themselves in the same light as you do? If you are transitioning from one job to another, or if you are a millennial who just got laid off, or left a job that wasn’t a good fit for you, one thing you are going to discover (through your transitions) is what truly makes you a valuable asset to any company. Most of the time, it’s finding that drive and passion within yourself and making it show in every interview and communication you’re having with a potential employer.

I’m a firm believer that if you can’t find that passion and feeling of drive in the industry you are pursuing, do some soul-searching and figure it out. Once you feel like you have a purpose and once you really show how genuine you are, people are going to notice.

Don’t Get Into the Comparison Game

Don’t compare yourself to everybody else around you. This was the hardest challenge for me to overcome (lets face it, we never truly overcome this, it’s natural to compare yourself to others). This happened because it seemed like everyone around me had their “stuff” together. It was really hard when I was transitioning between jobs not to compare myself to other people. A common thing I found myself thinking was “you aren’t good at what you want to do if these other 20-somethings have been at their job for as long as they have”. What picked me back up from these negative thoughts was what I covered in rule 1: surrounding myself with positive people! It’s hard picking yourself up from self-doubt. In a way, it’s easier (and maybe a little comforting) to be a little self-destructive in a time of uncertainty… we’ve all felt this. However, once we self-destruct with negativity it’s important to continue working toward your goals and find what personally motivates you. What feels better than feeling proud of yourself and having confidence in your abilities and in yourself?

Take-Away

Millennials, I can’t say it enough: Get used to being more comfortable with work limbo! It’s painful, it’s discouraging at times, but we grow stronger with each transition. As a result we solidify in our abilities and increase confidence that we will get through the bumpy times professionally. Please reach out to me via Twitter if you ever need a hint of motivation or advice. If you want to hear more stories, I’ve got plenty, let me know.

About the Author:

SeanKelly Anderson is a Healthcare Recruiter for NuWest Group in Bellevue, WA. SeanKelly graduated from Manhattanville College in New York with a bachelor’s degree in Public Relations, Advertising, and Applied Communication. She also has interned for a couple of companies including Recruiting Bandwidth and Velocity Search Partners. Writes for Crelate Recruiting Blog.


Source: Millennials Would be Wise to Embrace Work Limbo – Crelate

HR and Business Are Looking for Data Analytics and Insights

Stacey Browning, President of Paycor

Today our guest is Stacey Browning, President of Paycor.

Since 2001, Stacey has played an integral role in every aspect of Paycor’s operations. As president, she fosters collaboration across the business and ensures executional excellence in product development and service delivery.

Paycor is a trusted partner to more than 33,000 small and medium-sized businesses.Known for delivering modern, intuitive recruiting, HR and payroll solutions, Paycor partners with businesses to optimize their people management.

Paycor’s key areas of specialization include Payroll Management, Human Resources Solutions, Benefits Administration, Time & Attendance Solutions, Tax Filing & Compliance, Workers’​ Compensation and Employment Screening Service.

Recently Paycor announced Workforce Insights, a new data visualization solution that extracts rich and actionable insights from people data to bring valuable C-level and operational insights to key business stakeholders.

The interview is hosted by Alexey Mitkin, Founder, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief, The HR Tech Weekly® Online Media Co.

  1. Hi Stacey, and first of all thank you very much for this interview with The HR Tech Weekly®. Straight away, why you have developed Workforce Insights and how it will complement other Paycor products?

Our innovation is driven by uncovering ways to better serve our clients, and Workforce Insights is no exception. Last August we surveyed our clients about the features they wanted to see in future product releases. After reviewing more than 1,000 client responses, we found that the overwhelming majority were looking for data analytics and insights.

In addition to evaluating our client’s feedback, we also looked at industry trends that show HR professionals are striving to prove their strategic value to executives. One way we can help them is by organizing their key people data in a manner that helps with business execution.

For example, through the Workforce Insights overtime dashboard, information from our time platform is correlated to OSHA incidents reported on in our HR platform. Leaders can uncover safety thresholds exceeded by location, department or manager to home in on where a performance issue may be occurring.

  1. What key benefits and advantages does Workforce Insights have when compared with other tools on the market?

Most other tools on the market force standard charts and data visualization. Workforce Insights allows customers to view their data in the way that is most impactful for their unique business needs.

Another key differentiator is the one-click sharing functionality. Users can take their insights and share that information with the appropriate parties without having to import or export data. The custom reporting and one-click sharing allows users to not only have access to the data, but to make it meaningful and actionable.

  1. Why do you think small and medium-sized businesses need their own HR technology solutions?

Employees at small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) are often forced to wear multiple hats, and sometimes that even means taking on responsibilities like payroll. HR technology solutions help relieve the administrative burden of payroll and benefits while ensuring reliability and security, while also protecting against the risk of compliance infractions.

What Paycor offers seems to be what’s desired most by SMBs – a platform or suite of functionality at the right per-employee-per-transaction and per-month price point that doesn’t require a customization. A solution that can be implemented and have value derived in three days to three months, and that can adapt with them as their organization grows.

  1. Paycor has run its operations since 1990. How have your clients needs during this period changed, and what is the secret sauce for long-term success?

Since 1990, the technological needs of our clients have changed dramatically. In 1990 computers were large and expensive, “the cloud” didn’t exist, and phones were connected to a landline or, for a select few, in a bag in your car. Since then, clients have had to react to the demands of their workforce; faster access from any device, and our products have had to evolve accordingly.

Our secret sauce for long-term success may be the only thing that has remained the same since 1990 – putting our clients first. We were founded because our CEO believed there was a better way to serve the needs of our clients, and it’s that passion that still drives us today.

  1. Achievements in big-time sports are based on grassroots sports. What can you recommend to HR Tech startups on how to get into the highest league?

The energy around new HR tech offerings through start-ups informs the entire industry. For some of these startups, success looks like being acquired into a larger company and human capital offering. For those wanting to progress into a higher league more independently, I recommend having an openness to partnerships and distribution options, and feedback to the offering itself. The best emerging technologies in HR are built and market-tested quickly.

  1. Since its founding, Paycor has grown to 1,460 people onboard. What do newbies need to know about the company in order to have a successful career with you?

First, excel at the job you are given, and then look for ways to take on more responsibility. It can be dangerous to be too eager to move to the next level without first nailing the task you are given. At the same time, becoming complacent doesn’t allow you to be a change agent in the organization.

To take on that next challenge and excel to the next level it is critically important that associates know and own their personal brand. Your personal brand is what people say about you when you leave the room. Think about the impression you want to leave, and make it.


If you want to share this interview the reference to Stacey BrowningPaycor and The HR Tech Weekly® is obligatory.

15 Stress-Busting Jobs to Kickstart Your Career

15 Stress-Busting Jobs to Kickstart Your Career

15 Dream Jobs that Pay Well and are Low in Stress

Are you looking for a low-stress job that does not require you to compromise on the money you bring in home? Well, you are in luck because we have just the thing for you! The below infographic from Quantum Binders is a treasure trove of information when it comes to dream jobs that rank low in stress, rakes in the big bucks, and can get you well set on the path to success. While some of the jobs on this list may require you to get advanced degrees, a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and some previous work experience are all you require in most cases.

About the Author

Toby Dean works on behalf of Quantum Binders in content creation and marketing. He creates engaging graphics and content that help businesses stand out from the crowd. Over the past 7 years has worked with dozens of SME’s in both an agency and freelance capacity.


Source: 15 Stress-Busting Jobs to Kickstart Your Career – Quantum Binders Ltd

People you hire will be pivotal in shaping business culture and maintaining success!

epicor-software-executive-shares-his-vision-with-hr-from-c-level-perspective

Today our guest is Mr. Sabby Gill, Executive Vice President (EVP) International at Epicor Software.

Sabby Gill brings more than 20 years of international sales, operations and enterprise software industry experience to Epicor. In his role, Gill is responsible for operations including sales and professional services with a focus on accelerating company growth throughout Europe, Middle East & Africa (EMEA) and Asia Pacific (APAC).

Prior to Epicor, Gill was Senior Vice President of International Sales for IGT. He has also held executive management roles with leading technology companies including HP, CA Technologies, Oracle, PeopleSoft (acquired by Oracle), and DEC.

The interview is hosted by Alexey Mitkin, Founder, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief, The HR Tech Weekly® Online Media Co.

  1. In your recent article you have told us about how as companies grow and expand, there is a tendency for employees to be disengaged in the workplace due to heavier workloads, pressures, and deadlines. You explained how investing in the right technology can help companies manage this growth. What other drivers can you point to for ensuring employee satisfaction, engagement and wellbeing?

As your business grows you need your team to be strong, so the people you hire will be pivotal in shaping its culture and maintaining its success. Ensuring that your employees are happy and fully engaged is also vital. Take for example a traditional business that acquires smaller, nimble entrepreneurial entities to gain a competitive advantage but find the newly acquired talent assets that the company paid highly for start leaving the company. This is a common mistake made by many companies that are growing through acquisition but failing to consider the wellbeing of, and engage effectively with the organisation’s new employees.

Another important aspect for companies to consider is the influx of Millennials in the workplace. I would argue that it’s even more paramount for organisations of all types and sizes to create workplace environments that nurture the free-thinker and their entrepreneurial spirit. But where do organisations start? To begin, they need to understand the characteristics of entrepreneurial teams and what motivates them. You can almost forget about traditional incentive plans; when dealing with entrepreneurial types, “challenge” trumps traditional notions of compensation/rewards, because if the work environment isn’t challenging enough, they are likely to leave. They need to understand what the entrepreneur works for (and what they live for): The vision, the dream, the challenge – it’s their oxygen. To fully engage, entrepreneurs must buy into the vision.

As companies grow and with it create entrepreneurial teams, larger organisations may need to rethink placing talent in the constraints of the traditional hierarchical structure. These teams may be more effective when they are free to look at projects holistically: to craft a vision and define how problems will be solved. Remove as much process, structure, and bureaucracy as is feasible; as they prefer working without walls, and that includes traditional “job description” boundaries. 

  1. What do you expect from HR Managers delivering to the change management initiatives?

Employee ‘buy-in’ is the cornerstone of any change initiative and the onus often falls on HR to manage this process. Changing business processes can have an impact on employees’ familiar work routines whether or not they are directly involved in the project, so this process must be managed for the entire workforce. Employees need to be gradually introduced to new processes and job roles over a period of time so that they can accept and familiarize themselves with these developments. Neglecting this aspect or putting it off until later on in the project may result in organisational resistance to the new system, even to the point of operational risk. 

  1. Do you observe any distinctions when people from different industries, functions, and maybe regions, implement new software? For instance, what scares HR professionals more comparing with other business roles?

Change is never easy and most people are averse to change – this is true regardless of culture, industry and job function! HR’s challenge, given where it sits in an organisation, as opposed to other business roles, is helping employees, navigate and embrace any changes made in the organisation. 

  1. What are the core advantages Epicor®Human Capital Management delivers to HR and business when their demands and expectations grow toward self-service, engagement, micro-learning, and people analytics solutions? 

Today’s economy needs HR to adopt a more proactive and strategic role. To add to this, managers and employees are demanding direct access to human resource (HR) systems and information. Epicor Human Capital Management (HCM), delivers this and more, helping HR departments better manage a dispersed workforce, improve human resource processes, and make HR an integral part of an organisation’s strategic planning.

Epicor HCM is an intuitive, functional, and adaptable HCM solution that helps HR departments to spend more time managing talent than data. With Epicor HCM, HR teams have the ideal tool to manage their organisation’s most valuable resource—the workforce, who are pivotal maintaining a company’s success.

Epicor HCM automates everything related to HR in a single software system, enabling the organisation to track, manage, and analyse all data for the employees, from application to retirement. Through automated workflow, Epicor HCM allows organisations to improve efficiency. With powerful reporting and analytical tools, HR teams can gain a complete picture of the company’s workforce to enable better strategic planning.

  1. What technological trends will influence ERP and particularly HCM vendors in the nearest future, in your opinion?

The Cloud has without a shadow of a doubt been one of the biggest drivers of change in our industry. Organisations across the globe are beginning to realise the benefits of moving to the cloud, specifically:

  • Compelling connectivity — the ability to collaborate in real-time across remote sites, mobile employees, and trading partners
  • Enhanced operational efficiency — seamless operations, unparalleled scalability and flexibility, upgrade management, and business continuity
  • Improved security — higher level of security, network monitoring, and disaster prevention
  • Smart economics — the opportunity to achieve lower total cost of ownership (TCO) and positively affect the bottom line
  • Better resource allocation – improved ability to focus resources on core business activities and applications

These benefits are magnified when it comes to HCM because HCM has always been viewed as a non-critical, labour intensive function. By moving HCM applications to the cloud, organisations can make sure their HR teams focus on more business critical activities, reduce operational costs, and, most importantly, stay connected with an increasingly mobile workforce. 

  1. You have proven C-level experience in business development and managing people within global technological companies in EMEA, Asia Pacific and Latin America. What do you recommend to managers who strive to build their careers at the international markets?

My number one recommendation for managers is to be understanding and respectful of the various cultural differences. There is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach when it comes to dealing with people across markets. What works in the US might not be the right tactic for China, but sadly too many C-level executives take this for granted.

Secondly, “Be as good as your word – do what you say you’re going to do.” The idea of following through on commitments and being held accountable for your plans and actions is vital. It helps build trust and comfort with the people you deal with knowing that you bring credibility and will ensure that things get done. You want to be that person who others can rely on. People buy from people and your future is in the hands of what they say and what they do. When you enter a relationship, which is what we do when we implement ERP solutions, you need to care about the job you, and everyone else, does for that customer. Everything reflects on the promise you make to your customers, partners, investors and employees. Whichever way you look at it, their emotions, personal ambitions, etc., all play a part in the business at hand.

Thirdly, be an advocate of change and look for excellence in everything you do. Do not dither. C-level positions demand, as well as offer, respect. People expect answers and directions from those in these positions in a timely and articulate manner. Think about a driver of a high-performance car; with a professional driver behind the wheel you can obtain strong performance and look to break lap records. However if you put a novice behind the wheel, you will struggle to get the same results. You need to grow into the expert that people want to rely on to drive the business forwards.

Finally, I would say, continue “to reflect”. What I mean by this is always take a step back when you find yourself in a difficult or complex situation and reassess what it is that you are trying to achieve. Too many times we get fixated on finer details and can’t see the forest for the trees. Taking a step back can help us see the wider picture and realign our focus.


If you want to share this interview the reference to Sabby Gill and The HR Tech Weekly® blog is is obligatory.

High School Graduates Should Embrace Flexibility & Recruiters as They Enter College

Take Heed Millennials it Could be a Bumpy (But Exciting) Ride

It’s summer and, therefore, about 3 million students in America have graduated high school and are making plans for what to do next with their lives. In my family I have a niece that has graduated and so I’ve been giving some thought to the question (if she were to ask me): “Uncle Jason what advice do you have for me as I embark on my next adventures post-High School?”

I have posed this as a hypothetical question given that millennials often come across as having all the answers and so never give even a fleeting thought to ask an elder for advice or counsel about their futures. This thought-process has been going on for many decades, just par for the course.

Looking back I probably had the ‘know it all’ mindset as well. I wish I would have been a little more open to advice from older and wiser folks, things might have went more smoothly for me professionally. I would advise, therefore, to accept guidance from credible people that care about you—you’ll likely be glad you did.

Where does my credibility come from you ask? I am a Gen X guy who believed (almost with a religious zeal) that education was important and the more you had the better off you would be professionally. So, from 1993 until 2010 I embarked on an educational quest to attain a Doctorate in Sociology so I could teach and do research (read: save the world). Boy did I have “Big” plans.

Along the way I earned a B.A., with cum laude honors (Missouri State University), an M.A. with honors (University of Kansas), and a Ph.D. (University of Kansas). Little did I know (or care to pay attention to) the major structural changes occurring in higher education (over the past couple of decades) when I was in the midst of my educational marathon. Namely, one critical trend has been colleges and universities shifting from full-time tenure track to part-time contingent faculty teaching opportunities as a cost-saving measure. The pay and benefits for PT faculty is considerably lower than for FT faculty–and obviously this has had a major impact on recently minted Ph.D’s.

In 1969, 22% of the faculty were non-tenure track and 78% were tenure-track positions. Today, those numbers have flipped–33.5% of positions are tenure-track and 66.5% are non-tenure track/ineligible for tenure. Of course higher education is just one of many professions that has seen considerable change over the past several decades, but as a student it would have been smart for me to research the field more to know exactly what I was getting in to.

It is against this backdrop that I decided to make a major career change at 38 years of age. This certainly wasn’t what I planned when I was in my 20’s. Therefore, I think these life experiences qualify me to say a few words on the topic. Also, for more than a decade I was employed at three or four institutions of higher learning… so I’m keenly aware of some of the potential pitfalls of higher education.

So, even though no one I know that has graduated in 2016 has asked, I’m still going to take this opportunity to provide young people some advice that I think they should hear. Words to the wise I wish someone would have told me when I was 18 and heading off to college at Missouri State University in Springfield, Missouri.

Perhaps the easiest way to organize my thoughts is around a series of “Lies, Damned lies, and Statistics” (thanks Mark Twain) that we routinely tell our young people as they are growing up that can have negative consequences. At the end I will also pose a to-do-list of how to avoid the pitfalls that trap so many of us. As will be shown, having a recruiter on your side could serve as a real life-saver.

The truth is that millennials have been lied to in a myriad of ways so let me be your “friend at the factory” as Dr. Phil says.

The Lies

“You can be whatever you want when you grow up”

This is a classic lie that when I was growing up in the 1970’s/80’s was told over and over again ad nauseam. From the get go this doesn’t even make logical sense—even though I know it sounds great when saying it to our kids. The primary problem with this line of bull is there clearly aren’t enough “good jobs” to go around and so someone has to do the less desirable jobs (of which there are plenty).

Furthermore, it’s just a fact that some people aren’t cut out for (or have the ability to do) “the most desirable” “highest paying jobs.” You have to work with the hand you are dealt.  Some of us get a pair of Aces but most of us get a 4 and 8 off suit.

What’s more, there are approximately 12 million people who work full-time in the U.S. and the reality is an overwhelming majority (easily 3 out of 4) do not like their jobs. Several studies have indicated upwards of 70% “Hate” their jobs.

According to a recent article on salary.com, in 2015, 42% of people indicated that if they somehow became instant millionaires they’d be at the office the next day. I must call BS on this as well, and say that number is likely closer to 10%. Also noteworthy was 73% of respondents in the salary.com survey said they work “primarily for a paycheck”. This clearly supersedes all of the other ‘pie in the sky’ reasons we like to think people work: to be fulfilled, to give back to the community, to feel like I make a difference and so on.

What would be more appropriate would be to say, “Work like hell to attain highly sought after skills, abilities, and aptitudes and then be cautiously optimistic that you will reach your goals and dreams.” In other words, have a few ‘fallback’s’ ready to go in-case things beyond your control happen (and they do ALL of the time). This is also a great opportunity to seek out a professional recruiter so they can help you figure out the best career path for you.

“It’s more important to love what you do than worry about how much money you will make”

This one is a real heart-breaker for me because, as a sociologist, I told myself this lie a LOT over the years as I plowed along getting paid next to nothing to educate our youth. It’s ridiculous. If you don’t make a decent enough wage to meet your basic needs AND then have a little left over for fun and to save for the future you WILL be miserable, period. I will concur that money doesn’t = happiness. However, in order to do 90% of what you want to do in American society, it takes money. Plenty of people in America (believe me) don’t LOVE their jobs but LOVE cashing those checks if they are lucky enough to make a high salary.

“Your professional success directly correlates to how hard you work”

In other words, the harder you work the more likely your chances at professional success (and the less you work… yada yada). Oh my I could write a whole book on this lie (and maybe someday I will) – but suffice to say this part of the “American Dream” is completely dead for many people. There are millions in our country that work their asses off and get paid barely enough to survive and have a decent standard of living (and most of us are forced to work 2-3 jobs just to keep our heads above water). Since the early 1970’s the data clearly show that a gigantic majority of Americans are working harder (many more hours and increasing their productivity) for less and less pay. Millennials: be prepared to work your ass off and it *may* not translate into professional success. Sorry, that is the truth.

The Damned Lies

“Don’t worry about your Student Loan debt because once you graduate you will ‘magically’ have an amazing job that will pay you plenty to pay off those ‘pesky’ loans in no time”

This is truly a damnable lie if I ever heard one. There are many lies rolled into this one, so a little difficult to unravel. For one thing, given how expensive college has become there are a miniscule number of jobs (right out of college) that pay enough to allow a recent graduate to comfortably make their payments on the $40k or more (on average) they owe in student loans. A study in 2012 showed that in the past three decades the cost of a college degree has increased by a whopping 1,120%.  So, the cost of a college education has skyrocketed to the moon and 51% of all American workers make less than $30,000/year. What could go wrong here?

Furthermore, it’s astonishing to learn about America’s student loan debt, namely how completely out of control it is. My prediction is Student Loans are the next ‘housing bubble’. Estimates are that over $1.35 trillion is owed by current and former students and rising every day. Let me write out that number so you can let it sink in properly: $1,350,000,000,000. In by-gone eras where tuition was reasonable and wages steadily went up for *everyone* student loans were not a problem. This game has totally changed and young people need to go into college knowing the risks and potential rewards.

“The degree or degrees you earn from America’s ‘esteemed’ institutions of higher learning will virtually ‘guarantee’ you a ticket into the ‘Middle Class’” 

This one has been dead and buried for several decades now, but somehow often we still believe it (I think because we REALLY want it to be true). The facts show that much of the 2008 post-recession job growth has been in low-wage jobs. For those that choose a major where those skills, abilities, and aptitudes are in high demand – there’s a *chance* you can make it into the middle class, but there are NO guarantees.

“Colleges and Universities will provide you with excellent career counseling upon your graduation” 

Absolutely not. The hubris of our institutions of higher learning is such that most are still stuck believing in the stale notion that “You’ll have no problem getting a job because you graduated from our prestigious university” – News flash no one cares anymore about institutional hubris and reputation. Most employers could care less, believe me. You MUST go out and actively promote yourself and get on the networking train (early in the process). While you are deciding what to major in, you might also want to explore recruiting firms and start fostering relationships with these critical folks as soon as possible.

The Statistics

I could provide a treasure chest of anecdotes on how statistics lie like a sidewalk, but for brevity I’ll just point out one that routinely bothers me.

“Even though college costs are completely out of control, college is still worth it” 

The article will inevitably go on and on providing some BS statistics about how ‘in general’ it’s still a good idea. Tell that to the person who has an over-priced degree or degrees and can’t land a decent job to save his/her life. Believe me, they could care less about some dumb ‘longitudinal study’ showing how great college is—no matter what the costs and sacrifices are.

Just because some statistic says that those with an A.A. or B.A. make ‘slightly more’ over their lifetimes than someone without those degrees should NOT make the scam of college magically “worth it.”

What Should you Do?

So, hopefully you haven’t jumped off a cliff at this point and become too depressed. I’ve tried to present the state of affairs in a truthful fashion (based on personal experience and data when it’s available) so you know the rules of the game and what to expect. Now let me put some ‘verbs in my sentences’ and provide a tangible ‘to-do-list’ of things that I wish I had done. Take these seriously and you have a chance to be much happier than the 7 out of 10 people who dislike their jobs.

  • Contact several recruiting firms in your area and try to find a potential match early in your schooling. Do NOT rely on your college/university to provide any assistance in this critical process. Professional recruiters have grown by leaps and bounds over the past couple of decades and can be an absolute life-saver for those trying to navigate the tricky labor market waters.
  • Manage your expectations! Don’t believe the hype about how great your professional life is going to be – understand the realities of the U.S. economy in 2016 and that there are only so many things YOU can control.
  • Work very hard. Be ready to consistently put in maximum effort in the classroom and in your professional pursuits.
  • Do not wrap your ‘happiness’ in what you do for a living. This is so much easier said than done (honestly I still struggle mightily with this one). Seek professional help if you can’t disavow yourself from this notion.
  • While in college explore what types of avocations and other activities you would like to contribute to your community that are NOT work related. It is likely that these pursuits will be where you truly find happiness and fulfillment. In my case I’ve chosen to be a football and basketball official—incredibly rewarding.
  • Base your choice of major/minor not ONLY on what you are passionate about but also where there is the most demand. As much time as you study the things assigned to you by your generally out of touch professors spend a sizable amount of time also studying what the hot jobs are and how you plan to get one of those jobs.
  • Put ‘networking’ as one of your goals/skills as you work toward your degree(s). Be sure you have a LinkedIn profile and be extremely careful about what kinds of ‘social media’ you share with your potential employers.
  • Do a Return on Investment (ROI) analysis in regard to how much risk (student loan debt) you are willing to take on given the salary you *may* earn post-graduation. Be willing to go to a less expensive school (and be proud as hell to do so) knowing that you are making a much sounder financial decision than your peers who are overpaying at vastly overrated schools (that likely have an unhealthy opinion of themselves).
  • When you work during your college years (whether in the summer or during the regular school year) open up an IRA savings account with a trusted financial adviser. I don’t care if you can only afford to contribute $10/month, do it. This will help you learn the power of investing smartly and why it’s so important to save as much money as you can. You will be amazed at how your money can grow—if you have 30+ years to let it grow (and you do).
  • The Economy/Market are fluid and apt to abrupt change (in the supply and demand of labor) – so be ready to be flexible and nimble as you navigate your professional trajectory. Totally disregard the notion that you will spend your entire career at one or two entities. The reality is you will likely be on the move much more frequently.
  • Enjoy your college experience! If you only view it as a ‘means to an end’ for a high paying job you will truly miss out on many of the wonderful aspects of college that have nothing to do with materialism or financial gain. One of my fondest memories of college was being part of (and President my Junior year) of a Co-Ed Service Fraternity (Alpha Phi Omega) at Missouri State (Beta Mu Chapter). It was with this group that I learned the power and satisfaction of doing for others in one’s local community. I still try and carry out this mission at 40. The seed was planted when I was 18.

Conclusion

Congratulations to all 3+ million millennials who graduated in the spring. You should feel proud of your accomplishments and look forward to having a successful professional career. However, it’s crucial to know the game you are getting into and work hard at adapting to changes in the economy and the labor market. The ‘old’ rules just don’t work like they used to. As long as you go in with your eyes wide open you will have a much better chance of navigating successfully around the potholes that are inevitably in your paths.

Featured Service: Student Loan Hero


Source: High School Graduates Should Embrace Flexibility & Recruiters as They Enter College – Crelate