Avoid Making A Bad Hiring Decision With The Assistance Of Technology

rawpixel-com-323215 (1)A bad hiring decision can put a strain on a company financially with bad decisions, according to CV-Library, costing UK businesses losses of up to £15,000 (per hire). Due to the time and resources being invested into various different stages of the recruiting process. Unfortunately, these mistakes are at times inevitable and companies often feel the pinch of taking on board a bad hire. However, there are possible technological solutions that recruiters and hiring managers can adopt in order to reduce this risk and in the future make more effective hiring decisions.

Candidate screening

At times as many as 75% of applicants are underqualified for a given job role. Without the usage of hiring technology, it can result in recruiters spending a high proportion of their time sorting through applications and disregarding those unspecific to the position. If this is not done correctly, human error can ultimately affect the quality of hire and increases the chances of recruiting a ‘bad hire’.

Automated candidate screening reduces the reliance on a recruiter having to manually narrow down applications and instead this initial decision-making stage is managed with the addition of hiring technology. This type of automation works by filtering through CVs/resumes to determine the best fit for a specific role. Which can be dependent on different factors such as, experience, skills and qualifications. The applications are then narrowed down and the recruiter or hiring manager is presented with the most appropriate candidates to whom match the job requirements. By depending less on human evaluation to reduce high volumes of job applications, the risk of letting qualified candidates slip through the recruitment process is reduced. Saving the hiring professional valuable time to which they can reinvest back into other aspects of their profession.

Reconsider existing talent

High-quality candidates can often get overlooked, particularly those already existing within a talent database. These job seekers may have been unsuccessful for a previous role but their details are still stored and ‘kept on file’ but then are not made use of for future roles. Job-seekers have become tired of hearing this phrase after failing to land a job. However, this term can be taken to a new literal sense, with the addition of hiring technology.

New opportunities can be open up for existing candidates who failed to secure a previous role, enabling the recruiter to reconnect with the job seekers and find hidden talent already existing within their database. Which saves time and can find candidates who are already qualified for the role. This in turn, can improve the quality of hire, as these candidates may have a previously applied for a similar role and therefore already have the desired skill set and experience for the specific role.

Unconscious bias

In recruitment, there is always a risk of hiring decisions being made with influence from an unconscious bias. This is due to a perceived perception and notion regarding a candidate’s characteristics that may affect their job chances. Creating an unfair advantage or disadvantage to those applying for a role. Recruiting an individual with a biased thought process is likely to cloud the recruiter’s decision and their skills and experience may become secondary. This can easily result in a bad hiring decision, if their ability to do the job is not prioritised.

CiiVSOFT creates recruitment automation tools for talent acquisition, to help save costs and streamline hiring. Find out more here.

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Recruitment Tools: The Magic Lamp for HR

Recruitment Tools: The Magic Lamp for HR

Written by Sachin Gupta, CEO and Co-Founder, HackerEarth.

Sachin Gupta, CEO and Co-Founder, HackerEarth

Ask any business right now about their top challenges — chances are good that recruiting and retaining talent will be on the top three in the priority list. Smart organizations are aware that they’re only as good as their employees and will prioritize in hiring the best of the best for their organizations.

As technology continues to evolve, it is playing a significant role in the way companies approach the talent search and the hiring process. With companies not really carrying labels that say they are tech or non-tech anymore, finding and retaining great tech talent is what the hiring game is now all about.

According to a recent 2017 survey, finding and hiring top tech talent is what keeps the executives up at night. It has been the management’s greatest concern for the last five years. However, with recruiters latching on to online recruitment tools that are “smartifying” the hiring process, tech hiring was never easier, and never more reliable.

Time for a change

When LinkedIn and other online job applications first began to gain traction, they were considered as supplements to the traditional paper résumé and in-person interview. Today, the world of recruiting has gone nearly 100-percent digital. Traditional recruiting processes often fail to acquire the best and brightest. With smart online assessment tools, recruiters are no longer limited to interviewing candidates within a limited geographical radius, and they are less likely to make bad hires based just on snazzy résumés. They don’t need to put in hours sifting through résumés that are often not a reflection the saleable skills or manually evaluating tests. There is no place for unconscious bias either.

Online recruitment tools are replacing traditional methods that don’t always work. Entrepreneurs are ready to invest big in amazing technical assessment tools that automate complex screening and recruiting tasks to add real value.

Using traditional hiring methods are deal-breakers especially for companies looking at acquiring quality technical talent. There is no one-size-fits-all approach. Different requirements warrant different tools or processes. Be it a campus recruitment drive or hiring for niche profiles, online technical assessment tools have an answer. So, what is the reason for these tools to be highly successful?

Scale

A leading retailer wanted to scale its hiring process across Indian cities. When its current hiring process did not support the rapid expansion, the global e-com leader opted for online technical assessment tool. It allowed them to have multiple administrators and enabled them to conduct multiple recruitment drives from several cities for various roles and functions. The tool allowed them to assess thousands of candidates remotely and the proctoring mechanisms ensured a fair assessment. In a span of six months, the company conducted 200+ hiring drives and assessed over 27,000 candidates in different cities.

Time

Minimizes manual filtering of hundreds of résumés thus saving time. Significantly reduces the number of interviews your technical team needs to take to find the right candidate. Prevents the number of candidates from becoming a bottleneck because any number of candidates can be tested simultaneously. This meant hiring managers and technical managers spending less time assessing candidates and wasting no time on irrelevant candidates.

Efficient campus hiring

Large enterprises usually hire developers in big numbers. Campus hiring is one of the many modes that these organizations use. Using an online recruiting tool, these companies can accurately measure the technical skills of candidates. Online tools will also help these companies to hire from different campuses across states thus achieving the numbers they want to.

Exhaustive Question Library

Some of the best tools nowadays supports multiple question types including programming, MCQ, subjective, android, and front-end programming. These libraries help companies to save time on problem setting and test candidates on assorted topics.

Proctoring measures

Recruiting tools come with the best proctoring measures which helps the recruiters test candidates remotely. These tools have built-in features like plagiarism detector, candidate snapshot, restricting multiple logins among others.

The conclusion

Hiring quality tech talent is the common denominator across all organizations. And the online recruiting tools are significantly better at finding them quality talent than the traditional processes that have been followed till now.

By using a tool such as the automated assessment platforms, even non-tech recruiters can conduct technical screening without a hitch. These coding platforms are significantly better than the processes that already exist in these companies. As these tools are easily integrable with the recruiting workflow of an organization, software giants should be happy to take this route.

To rephrase the famous saying from the movie Ratatouille, “Not everyone can become a great developer; but a great developer can come from anywhere” Make sure you don’t lose out on them.


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Millennials Would be Wise to Embrace Work Limbo

Millennials Would be Wise to Embrace Work Limbo

Job transitions are going to become more and more prevalent as work evolves over the next several decades. Millennials should plan on embracing work limbo.

College to Job Transition: A Personal Story

College to Jobs can be Bumpy

Moving from College to the “Real World” can be Bumpy Ride

After graduating last May, I thought I had my entire future planned. It seemed so easy. Of course it took a lot of work and planning to get all of these things to happen, but I did it and I thought, “Well… I did it! This will be my life for the next two years or so”. I got an awesome full-time paid internship to come home to in Seattle. Then I put in a deposit for my first apartment. Life seemed all set-up and great!

However, soon I would be introduced to the real world; the reality of being a millennial, a young professional in an ever growing city. I would live the reality of the ebb and flow of work limbo that is prevalent today.

If you are a Millennial like me, I have one thing to say to you: get used to job transitions! Get used to feeling like you’re on a roller coaster for the next few years of your professional career! Further, get used to feeling a little out of control and in a state of ‘limbo’ during your adulthood in general.

It’s Going to be Okay

You will survive. I have gone through two job transitions in the past 7 months, three jobs if you count the internship I had right after graduation. When I left my first job, it was difficult not to be hard on myself. It really took a toll on my self esteem. But the thing that kept me going and made me persist was the knowledge that a job that would be better fit was in my future. My reason to leave the last job wasn’t because of my inability to adapt or work hard, it was just that the job didn’t align with my goals/aspirations. It was because the company wasn’t a good fit for me. Plain and simple. The tech industry wasn’t for me. I wasn’t passionate about it, and the company I worked for consisted of a tight knit group of senior recruiters who didn’t know how to train new grads. It just didn’t work out – and that is OKAY.

It’s hard not to feel discouraged and question your place in your profession when it seems like every place you go, something never works out. I’m not going to tell you that it’s been easy transitioning and I’m not going to lie when I say that I’ve doubted myself; but what I will tell you is that I have done self-reflection that has changed my life for the better. Also, the past 7 months have given me a great idea of what I do and don’t want in my next work environment. If you are transitioning… I promise it will be okay. More importantly, surround yourself with supportive individuals who will nourish and heal you throughout your transitions and self-examination. This will help you remain positive and keep you on your feet.

Be Yourself. Be Genuine

Be Genuine. Be Yourself

So important to stay genuine even when going through career limbo

Don’t lose who you are in transitions. My life is not as black and white as I thought it would be after graduation. My mindset was 50 years behind. Back in May, I planned my life to work like: get a job offer before graduation, get an apartment set up before graduation, stay at the job and get promotions for a few years. I’m sure a lot of people will chuckle at this naive mindset, trust me, now I do too. Of course, we all probably planned out a Utopian way of life such as this. You thought, “Hey, I’m a hard-working and creative individual. I’m willing to learn, and have valuable ideas! Who wouldn’t want to work with me?”

I can tell you right now that while all of those things might be true about you, everyone else thinks the same thing. Here’s the reality of this situation and here’s the real question: how will you stand out in a sea of millennials who see themselves in the same light as you do? If you are transitioning from one job to another, or if you are a millennial who just got laid off, or left a job that wasn’t a good fit for you, one thing you are going to discover (through your transitions) is what truly makes you a valuable asset to any company. Most of the time, it’s finding that drive and passion within yourself and making it show in every interview and communication you’re having with a potential employer.

I’m a firm believer that if you can’t find that passion and feeling of drive in the industry you are pursuing, do some soul-searching and figure it out. Once you feel like you have a purpose and once you really show how genuine you are, people are going to notice.

Don’t Get Into the Comparison Game

Don’t compare yourself to everybody else around you. This was the hardest challenge for me to overcome (lets face it, we never truly overcome this, it’s natural to compare yourself to others). This happened because it seemed like everyone around me had their “stuff” together. It was really hard when I was transitioning between jobs not to compare myself to other people. A common thing I found myself thinking was “you aren’t good at what you want to do if these other 20-somethings have been at their job for as long as they have”. What picked me back up from these negative thoughts was what I covered in rule 1: surrounding myself with positive people! It’s hard picking yourself up from self-doubt. In a way, it’s easier (and maybe a little comforting) to be a little self-destructive in a time of uncertainty… we’ve all felt this. However, once we self-destruct with negativity it’s important to continue working toward your goals and find what personally motivates you. What feels better than feeling proud of yourself and having confidence in your abilities and in yourself?

Take-Away

Millennials, I can’t say it enough: Get used to being more comfortable with work limbo! It’s painful, it’s discouraging at times, but we grow stronger with each transition. As a result we solidify in our abilities and increase confidence that we will get through the bumpy times professionally. Please reach out to me via Twitter if you ever need a hint of motivation or advice. If you want to hear more stories, I’ve got plenty, let me know.

About the Author:

SeanKelly Anderson is a Healthcare Recruiter for NuWest Group in Bellevue, WA. SeanKelly graduated from Manhattanville College in New York with a bachelor’s degree in Public Relations, Advertising, and Applied Communication. She also has interned for a couple of companies including Recruiting Bandwidth and Velocity Search Partners. Writes for Crelate Recruiting Blog.


Source: Millennials Would be Wise to Embrace Work Limbo – Crelate

AI

Why and How to Improve Your Candidate Experience with AI

Why and How to Improve Your Candidate Experience with AI

An organization’s candidate experience is directly associated with their employer brand. Failing to attend to your employer brand can be detrimental to your organization. Nearly 60% of candidates have had a poor candidate experience, and 72% of those candidates shared that experience online or with someone directly.

The power that word-of-mouth holds in this day and age is exponential compared to any other marketing tool as 92% of consumers believe recommendations from friends and family over all forms of advertising. Cleaning up your employer brand, once negative word-of-mouth has spread, is harder than it may seem. How can you ensure a good candidate experience every time and in turn ensure a good employer brand? Artificial intelligence may be the answer:

Avoiding the ATS Black Hole

What is the ATS black hole? This is the phenomenon many candidates experience when they submit an application or resume online and have no way of knowing if it was received. It leaves potential candidates in the dark because they don’t know whether to expect a call or forget about the opportunity altogether. How can you avoid the ATS black hole for your candidates?

Many corporate recruiters already have more to do than they can handle, and responding to all applications can seem next to impossible. This is where artificial intelligence comes in. AI can be used in the recruitment process by integrating with an ATS and notifying candidates when their application has been received. It can help set guidelines of when, or if, they’ll receive a response. No one will slip through the cracks (even those not qualified for the position).

The communication shouldn’t stop there. 65% of candidates say they either never or rarely receive employer notice of the decision made on their application. With the use of AI, once a job posting has been filled and closed, candidates who were not offered the position will be automatically notified and given other open positions within the organization for which they may be better suited. This improves their experience (and job search) and reduces your recruitment team’s workload by moving applicants into a more appropriate funnel. Using AI in your talent acquisition process broadens your talent funnel without burning out your recruiters.

Guide the Way

93% of job seekers cited unclear application instructions as the primary cause of a bad candidate experience. Unclear application instructions can result in candidate delays submitting resumes or no submission at all.

A CareerBuilder survey found that 40% of candidates feel the application process has become increasingly difficult. With the guide of a chatbot, applicants will sail through the process. They receive direction and clarification in an instant rather than waiting for a recruiter to respond back to them when, or if, they have time.

Using a chatbot also provides advantages to the recruitment team as the chatbot can use the feedback from the candidate and apply it to the selection process. The recruitment team can then easily see how each candidate ranks from the applicants selected by the platform.

Provide a Two-Way Street for Communication

Time and time again, we’ve heard that communication is a two-way street. Yet many candidates feel the application process is strictly one-way and they’re the ones doing all the talking. 60% of applicants say “better communication throughout and after the application process,” would have the most positive impact.

Using AI, recruiters would be able to provide the communication so many candidates are looking for. Having a chatbot integrated into the recruiting process would allow candidates to ask relevant questions throughout the application process. A chatbot will also provide a faster and more efficient way to respond with meaningful answers from the recruitment team.

Creating a positive candidate experience is no doubt a crucial part of investing in your employer brand. Implementing artificial intelligence will give you the edge you need within your hiring process and have candidates lining up to apply for the positions at your company without fear they’ll be disappointed, overlooked or simply forgotten.

About the Author:

Noel Webb, co-founder and CEO of Karen.ai

Noel Webb is co-founder and CEO of Karen.ai (Your Cognitive Recruiting Assistant), the latest project from his role as Director of Product Innovation at Innosphere. A veteran of business development and out-of-the-box thinking, Noel has been a leader in his roles over the years for several companies, including Bam Digital, SpeakFeel and Agnition.


If you want to share this article the reference to Noel Webb and The HR Tech Weekly® is obligatory.

The first investment of 500 Istanbul in 2017 goes to Peoplise

Peoplise

BIG NEWS: The first investment of 500 Istanbul in 2017 goes to Peoplise!

500 Istanbul, a micro-fund focusing on Turkish startups within the San Francisco-based 500 Startups, has invested in Peoplise.

This investment is catapulting Peoplise to the next phase, accelerating our global expansion, especially in the UK and US markets.

500 Istanbul started 2017 with a Series A Round investment in Peoplise.

Peoplise, with its innovative digital solutions for recruitment, improves the existing talent acquisition processes, creating a more effective candidate experience. After identifying the candidates within the desired criteria on social media, Peoplise offers a unique, employer branded solution to assess the selected candidates quickly and efficiently with a monthly subscription model.

Companies achieve significant savings due to the optimization; they are accelerating the talent acquisition processes 10 times with their social media, analytics and video technologies while still keeping the human-touch.

Our digital platform, has evaluated over 500,000 candidates, serves more than 50 corporate clients, including global giants in a variety of industries. It provides a solution that is complete, intuitive and easy.


Source: The first investment of 500 Istanbul in 2017 goes to Peoplise!

 

The Biggest Change Set For Business Across The Globe

The Agile Working Event

The world of work as we know it is changing. Where, when and how we work and communicate are all questions that are being asked by workforces across the globe and as a result organisations of all sizes are entering a period of significant change as they prepare for the future of work.

The Agile Working Event is a brand new one-day conference that will give senior HR professionals and business owners the opportunity to hear from agile working leaders and industry pioneers who have implemented change that has resulted in success for employees and business. The agenda boasts key organisations such as BT, Nationwide, Eon and Lancaster University as well as a Keynote address from Fiona Cannon of Lloyds Banking Group and CEO of the Agile Future Forum.

We know that a highly engaged workforce has the potential to reduce staff turnover by up to 87% and it is these statistics that are making the headlines and making businesses stop and plan for the future. Prospective employees from the latest generation no longer just think about their pay cheque before accepting a job. Office dynamics, workforce engagement, remote working opportunities, technology enablers and office aesthetics are key priorities when searching for a new role.

Further research has found that losing a valued employee due to poor working conditions or lack of engagement could cost upwards of £10,000. Retaining the best talent in any market is considered business critical and this results from this research further outlines why.

Gone are the days of candidates choosing their new job based on salary alone. Millennials now have a huge expectation of their prospective employer when it comes to technology and remote working availability for example. Yet still employers are making the fatal mistake of offering items such as this as a feature or a benefit of working for said company, rather than a standard requirement.

When it comes to workforce performance, attracting and retaining great people, and overall business success, organisations need to consistently review their operations when looking to adapt an agile working strategy.

The Agile Working Event boasts a line up of speakers whom have campaigned for agile working for business, who challenge ‘the norm’ and ultimately who have a passion in sharing real-life case studies behind their very own agile working journey in order to aid business.

Sebastien Bonicel, Agile Transformation Coach, EON and a key speaker at The Agile Working Event 2017 has based his agile working approach around the relationships within the organanisation and specifically how we communicate, why and when. Sebastien believes that understanding relationships within the workplace is a key indicator as to why we go to work in the first place. One idea that Sebastien has of which he will speak on detail on at the event, even goes as far as having a P&L for relationships in the workplace in order to see how this is linked to both individual and organisation performance.

Event organisers, Sonas Events Ltd, seek to provide a forum for the business community both in the UK and globally in which delegates can share experiences and take away a toolbox of solutions to implement within their own businesses, that ultimately deliver results.

Adam Cox, Director at Sonas Events Ltd said about the launch, “The Agile Working Event launches at an opportune juncture in the future of business. Organisations across the world are consistently reviewing their strategies in order to ensure they are at the forefront of their industry sectors, and as it stands I don’t think the business world has had to prepare for anything quite like this. The rulebook is being thrown out with many organisations encouraging their staff to promote the way in which they want to work rather than dictating it to them. The Agile Working Event aims to bring together like-minded professionals to collaborate, share knowledge and debate key issues facing their operations in obtaining agile working status and I am looking forward to welcoming delegates to London on 29 March 2017”.

For further information on The Agile Working Event please visit:
www.agileworkingevent.com

Early bird tickets are still available for a short time only and you can save £100 on your ticket by clicking here: https://billetto.co.uk/en/events/agile-working-event/tickets

Don’t Trust Your Gut: 3 Guidelines for Evidence-Based Recruiting

Chess Algorithms

Experience is generally good. Employers love job candidates with impressive track records. But when we on the hiring decision-making side start gaining experience in recruiting, there is a dark side that we need to be aware of if we still want to be effective.

The problem with growing experience in recruiting positions is that you start to gain confidence in your judgement. And that gut feeling about job candidates clouds the decision-making of even the best of us.

The essence of evidence-based recruiting is that you build your recruiting practice on the best available scientific evidence. What is scientific evidence? It is not expert opinions, TED Talks or blog posts. Why not? Because they are opinions without rigorous methodology backing them up. Sure, there is often wisdom in the words of HR influencers, but in order to be effective, basic evidence-based guidelines should be in place.

In the core of evidence-based recruiting should be a hiring algorithm. Algorithm is simply a formula that calculates the score of each of your job candidates. Algorithmic decision-making is simple – you hire the candidate with the highest score. But an algorithm won’t work without variables. It is the recruiter’s responsibility to build the formula – decide what kind of data to gather from the candidates and which factors matter the most. But where to start?

Screening methods – the fairest of them all

I/O psychologists have been studying selection methods with meta-analytic methods for around a 100 years, and there is a clear consensus that General Cognitive Ability (GCA) – also known as General Mental Ability (GMA) or Intelligence Quotient (IQ) – is the most versatile and powerful of the methods commonly in use. Considering how simple-to-use and cheap methods there are available, it is a mystery why these tests are not more widely adopted in practice.

Especially as a screening method, GCA measure is powerful for a couple of reasons. First, for most jobs, the job requirements aren’t set in stone. Especially in startups or companies working in dynamic markets, the contents of employees’ jobs tends to change a lot. GCA is a measure that indicates how well the candidate would be able to learn new things. Second, and related, when the job requirements are complex or new, higher information processing capacity, which is what GCA essentially measures, helps candidates perform better.

Research suggests, that the best predictive validity is achieved when GCA is coupled with other methods that preferably are “MECE” – mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive. This means that the other methods used should be strong as well, but they should measure different constructs that GCA tests measure. Famous companies such as Google measure GCA together with other variables – namely, “Googleyness” – that they have internally found predictive for future performance. Some evidence-based factors found in I/O psychology are conscientiousness and integrity, and most companies would actually get better results with these methods than with using classic unstructured job interviews as a go-to method. But I bet that…

You are going to interview anyway, so here is how to do it right

One common mistake that many recruiters make is not structuring their job interviews.

How do you expect to compare the candidates if you ask each of them different questions? And how do you expect to hire actual talent if you let human error come in between? If you use the so called “free talk” method (the losing method) to interview candidates, you are bound to simply get along better with some candidates than with others. If the recruiter was changed, the result would most likely be different too, and this is not a good indicator of the reliableness of the interview.

Structuring interviews takes some work, but it’s principles are fairly simple. Essentially, structured interview is an employment interview where

  1. the same questions are asked of each candidate in the same order
  2. free talk is minimised
  3. the evaluation criteria for each question are determined beforehand

The two best types of questions are behavioral and situational. Behavioral questions ask about candidates’ past performance in order to predict how the candidate is likely to perform in the future. Situational questions present hypothetical situations and ask how the candidate would proceed in a given situation.

The outcome of designing the structured interview should be an “interview booklet”. This guide provides a set of predetermined questions (based on variables you have deemed to be necessary for success in the job), room for note-taking and a guide for evaluation. It should be written in a way that anyone even without recruiting experience would be able to run the interview.

If you want to be really professional, have interviewers write down the answers of each candidate, and let someone else evaluate the answers. This obviously takes time, and you need to make the call whether the added value is worth it.

Decision time? Enter Excel

So. You have built your hiring algorithm (hopefully based on GCA and other reliable variables) and collected data to measure those variables using tests and structured interviews. Now it is time to be humble, and let your new best friend Excel make the decision for you.

When you let an algorithm decide for you, you are going to get an improvement of about 50% in predicting work performance. And the interesting fact is that even the most experienced recruiters with years of experience fail more often than algorithms.

Let’s go one step further than that. Even when there is a group of experts, and when they have more data available than your excel table (the algorithmic decision-maker), their decisions are worse. Why is this and what can you do to improve?

A likely reason, as mentioned, is that these bad choices arise from various psychological biases. We as humans are overly influenced by first impressions, personalities and our own values, among other things. Because hiring decisions are essentially prediction problems – ”which candidate would perform the best in the job?” – we should use statistical algorithms which are tools originally built for prediction problems.

This does not mean that experts are unimportant. They are a great source of insight in building the algorithm in the first place. But it does mean that HR professionals need to be humble and understand their limitations. Hiring managers need to be aware and continuously measure the success factors for each job in their company, but they need to restrain themselves when the decision-time comes.

Evidence-based decision-making is the first step towards next-generation recruiting. Most of the algorithmic methods discussed here are going to be adopted to various HR tech applications in the future, but by knowing the basics, you can already start making better decisions while waiting for Big Data and AI to become mainstream in the industry.

Further reading:

Danieli, O., Hillis, A., & Luca, M. (2016). How to Hire with Algorithms. Harvard Business Review, https://hbr.org/2016/10/how-to-hire-with-algorithms

Kuncel, N. R., Klieger, D. M., Connelly, B. S., & Ones, D. S. (2013). Mechanical versus clinical data combination in selection and admissions decisions: A meta-analysis. Journal of Applied Psychology, 98(6), 1060.

Levashina, J., Hartwell, C. J., Morgeson, F. P., & Campion, M. A. (2014). The structured employment interview: Narrative and quantitative review of the research literature. Personnel Psychology, 67(1), 241-293.

Schmidt, F. L., & Hunter, J. E. (1998). The validity and utility of selection methods in personnel psychology: Practical and theoretical implications of 85 years of research findings. Psychological bulletin, 124(2), 262.

Schmidt, F. L. (2002). The role of general cognitive ability and job performance: Why there cannot be a debate. Human performance, 15(1-2), 187-210.

If you want to share this article the reference to Max Korpinen and The HR Tech Weekly® is obligatory.

Best Practices Guide to Recruiting Passive Candidates

Passive Candidates

Considering that 66% of millennials rate life outside of work as more important than their career, chances are that the candidates you are looking for aren’t spending much time looking for you. For this reason, among many others, passive candidates are becoming the new purple squirrel. Some of the best talent around may be just satisfied enough to stay where they are.

Don’t Waste Time on Cold Calls

Believe it or not, sending a direct message through a social platform (yes, even the professional ones) is about as effective and efficient as a good old fashioned cold call. It is certainly possible to find some great hires via direct messaging, and even generate a few referrals. However, consider how much time are you spending to fill one open position; with all the non-interested and unqualified candidates, forget about sourcing enough talent to staff an entire office. If the goal is to find the hidden gems in a sea of passive candidates, your recruitment strategy will need to incorporate the latest in talent acquisition technology and trends.

Some popular social platforms even charge recruiters to send messages to potential candidates. If you have enough open jobs to fill, that could get quite expensive. The big pink elephant that most talent acquisition teams don’t want to admit is that sending unsolicited messages to candidates is SPAM, even via LinkedIn. Sending those unsolicited messages doesn’t give off a very good impression of your organization.

There are several assumptions that go into contacting a passive candidate on social channels, the least of which is whether the candidate profile is accurate and current. That’s not to say there is no fruit on that tree, but it isn’t the low hanging fruit and it takes a lot of time and effort to reach it.

Source More Passive Candidates with Employee Referrals

One great way to reach a broader audience of passive candidates is through an employee referral program (ERP). Just think about it. Word of mouth marketing and advertising has long been touted the most effective at providing great return on investment. Everyone loves customer referrals, and some companies even incentivize clients to refer new business. The same rules should apply to employee referral programs. Even though 84% of employer’s rate employee referrals as the best source for return on new hire investment, only 8% of organizations feel they have the right program in place to reach these candidates.

By utilizing employee referrals, you are turning what would have been a hit-or-miss cold call into a warm transfer. You are no longer sending spam to candidates you are trying to recruit, and you have the endorsement of your current team. In addition, employee referrals help to pre-screen candidates for cultural fit, which is something even the most experienced talent acquisition teams could take 1-2 interviews to uncover.

Seeing that 52% of millennials consider corporate loyalty to be overrated, an employee referral might be the catalyst needed to take your passive candidate sourcing and talent acquisition strategies to the next level.

New Talent Acquisition Technology

Technology is great, however there are some major concerns with how employee referral programs are being developed and implemented. Misapplication of technology has attempted to replace human connections with a computer-based algorithm, resulting in underperforming ERPs. The current state of technology in the recruitment marketplace has focused on the ability of tech and social media to source, match, and present candidates for hire. The reality is that a computer match is not a referral, but merely a set of matching keywords and for this reason does not provide the results expected of a referred employee. Automation is not the same as a referral and as such has not solved the problem of reaching passive talent.

Talent acquisition efforts at a local level have made great strides by incorporating internet job boards and social media into candidate sourcing strategies, but these techniques alone are not enough to create the groundswell of support among employees that would be required to make an automated process a reliable source of organic employee referrals. The most effective ERPs include ways to share jobs via social media and distribute to networks of connections, but they also include functions like referral bonus tracking, employee notifications, employee engagement reporting, ATS integration and more. These are the types of force multipliers that are difficult to develop at a local level and are often beyond the reach of HR teams.

At Lingo, we believe in the power of referrals. That’s why we took our best in class referral marketing platform and re-invented employee referrals for the digital generation. With Lingo, employers can load jobs (one at a time or in bulk) and current employees are automatically notified of the new job openings via the Lingo mobile app. Employees can then elect which jobs to share, which channels to share them on (text message, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and email), and which of their friends are best suited for the role. Employees can even elect to share the job opening on their social profile wall, and endorse applicants as they see fit. By taking the keyword matching and automation out of the process, you can empower your staff to recruit the most qualified candidates they know, even the most passive contenders.

Click here to learn more about recruiting passive candidates with employee referrals and how Lingo Careers enables teams to increase talent acquisition efficiency.


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Learn to Love Not Loath the Technical Interview

Job Interview

The Potential Stress of Technical Interviews

Technical recruiters should take heed, it’s really important to help ease the nerves of developers as they prepare for their technical interviews for programming positions. Going in with the right mindset and game-plan is critical for landing the job. Crelate offers some ‘inside’ information from John Franti of Epicodus – a vocational school for aspiring programmers.

The technical interview is the most nerve-wracking part of the hiring process for most new or junior developers. Probably for most developers, full-stop. Programmers with years of accumulated experience and confidence report the same doubts, nerves, and anxieties every time the interviewer points to the whiteboard.

Jerry Maguire

And why wouldn’t we? A search for the term “technical interview” in the Computers & Technology section on Amazon returned 710 responses. Among the books that are “must-haves” for junior developers are Cracking the Coding Interview and Elements of Programming Interviews. Both are great resources and immensely helpful, but if you don’t have time to read the books here are a few things to ponder.

Seemingly Everyone has an Opinion for how to Prepare

Everyone should prepare for any interview, but there can be a hidden message communicated by this flood of guidance, advice, and “insider” information: The technical part of your interview is a terrifying experience that will haunt you and ruin your future.

Additionally, there is no widely acknowledged difference in the literature between the skills needed to successfully interview for a job, or work as a systems architect at Google or Facebook and a junior front-end or back-end developer at an agency, or start-up. To believe the conventional wisdom, everyone needs to be a “10x haxxor”, a “ninja”. This is whatJacob Kaplan-Moss called the Programming Talent Myth. There are few great programmers, and everyone else is untalented and unfit to work as a programmer. Wrong. Instead, Kaplan-Moss tries to enforce the idea that programming skills follow the same bell curve as any other set of skills. By this theory there are a few extremely talented people, a very few uniquely unskilled individuals, and the majority of programmers fall somewhere in the middle of the pack.

It’s no wonder that so many developers suffer from imposter syndrome or even fail to apply for relevant jobs for fear of being unqualified given the high bar of success that is often set. This doesn’t have to be the case. I’ve helped hundreds of students in my role at Epicodus prepare for their very first programming interviews. There are direct carryovers from the skills a person has at the keyboard to the skills needed at the whiteboard.

Think of the Technical Interview as a Conversation

Silicon Valley, Part-1

A good technical interview should be a conversation. It should not be a test of knowledge. A technical interview is best used when it evaluates how a candidate thinks and works, not evaluating what they know. The candidate’s resume, and the non-whiteboard part of the interview should be sufficient to determine if they have experience with the required languages, frameworks, and concepts. As an interviewee, if you’re asked to whiteboard, that’s great news – the interviewer knows you have the skills to work through a difficult question, and wants to see how you do so.

Tips & Tricks for the Technical Interview

So, what are some good practices?

I love the idea of treating each technical question like a mini-project. First, have the interviewer repeat the question. Second, listen carefully, and write down a list of specs. Where? On the whiteboard, of course.

Again, you’re showing how you work. You work from a list of specs, like the good, professional developer you are. Therefore, once the specs are listed, read them back and start looking for keywords and easy requirements that will help you answer the question.

* Are you writing a function? Get the word function and some curly braces up on the board.

* Does the function accept any kind of argument? Get it in the parens.

* Does the function return a value? Let’s put a return statement at the end of the function.

Easy, right?

A Couple More Words of Wisdom

Silicon Valley, Part-2

The purpose of all this boilerplate, or any similar setup is to give ourselves a familiar work space. Further, it’s how we write functions when we’re in our text editor – why would it be any different just because it’s ink and not pixels? It also gets some information on the board, and can get you thinking.

Are you stuck, or do you need to test your algorithm? Draw a box on the whiteboard and list your variables and their initial values inside. This box represents machine memory during the process. Next, pass some test data into your function and talk through the behavior with the interviewer while changing the values within the box. By doing live, manual testing this often can help the interviewee get unstuck.

And of course, it’s alright to say “I don’t know” as long as you finish with the word “…yet.” Then, go forward with the interviewer. How would you go about finding out? What terms would you search for? Where have you seen similar behavior? Keep communicating and showing how you think.

A Note for Interviewers

Finally, for interviewers who may be reading this, because the goal of the technical interview is how we think and not what we know, the question itself doesn’t need to be that hard. A new programmer can show just as much knowledge writing a factorial algorithm as they can solving an advanced sorting problem. The way the thought process is communicated is often what stands out.

You can check out a few more simple tips within my lesson at Learn How to Program.


Source: Learn to Love Not Loath the Technical Interview – Crelate

The Future of Recruiting and Hiring with AI

Future of HR Tech

Talent acquisition can be one of the most time consuming and frustrating aspects of business. Harsh deadlines and specific requirements, not to mention the piles of applications and resumes, is tough for any recruiter. Tack on retention accountability, candidate experience and employer branding and the job becomes even harder. The emerging HR technology throughout the last decade has strived to take away these many frustrations while improving candidate experience and quality of hire.

The buzz around artificial intelligence this year is being shrugged off by many as just a new word HR got ahold of, but what would happen if AI was actually embraced by the recruiting and hiring world? What could it do to further practices and solve problems? This is exactly what Karen.ai are trying to do. How is AI enabled software aiming to better recruitment and the candidate experience?

  1. Candidate Matching

Matching the right candidates to the right positions, that’s the name of the game, but it’s not as easy as it may sound. 52% of recruiters say the hardest part of their job is identifying the right candidates from a large applicant pool. Resume parsing and keyword search advances within an ATS has made the sifting and shifting of this task a bit easier as it picks up on keywords in resumes and cover letters to pull ones that match the most. But as we’ve traversed from keyword matching, to semantic search and contextual search, it’s clear we have not perfected Artificial Intelligence in candidate matching just yet. Today’s products are using Natural Language Processing for even more efficient and learning tools.

75% of job seekers’ chances of landing an interview are killed by errors in the ATS or by restrictive keyword search parameters. Limiting the search to a set amount of keywords does not always guarantee the most qualified candidate or best fit for the job requirements. However, Karen, an Artificial Intelligence software we built specifically for recruiting and hiring, builds off the basic keyword search, broadening the results with a more advanced version that includes semantic search, contextual search and integrates candidate chat conversations, eliminating fuzzy matches.

The ability to find concepts hidden in text, in addition to traditional keyword search will give recruiters a more complete look at the candidate’s qualifications and help improve the candidate matching process. In addition, this new software will take the information learned from the resume and cover letters to potentially help match candidates to jobs they may be better fit for within the company during and after the application process.

  1. Candidate Rank and Score

In addition to pulling out the most qualified candidates for the position based on keywords and concepts, recruiters and hiring managers are expected to then select the best ones to move on in the process. Many use the rank and score method based on what was found within the resume and cover letter. Artificial intelligence is now helping recruiters do this faster by leveraging big data and predictive analytics. Some companies that already do this include Hiredscore and Ideal.com.

While this helps professionals get to the next step in the hiring process quicker, what seems to be missing is the interaction with the candidates and those who did not make it to the next step in the process.

A study conducted by CareerBuilder found an astonishing 75% of people said they didn’t hear back from the company to which they applied. This is where the ATS black hole comes into play and how Artificial Intelligence can help fight it. Karen steps into the process from the beginning, conversing with candidates, learning from their interactions and assimilating the data into a decision: continue down the pipeline or exit in a brand-minded way. In either scenario, Karen ensures the candidate knows where they stand.

  1. Conversation Service for Candidate Engagement and Brand Experience

The ATS black hole is something of which many recruiters and candidates are all too familiar. 74% of job seekers say a clear timeline of the hiring process is what could improve their candidate experience the most, according to a report by applicant tracking systems consulting website Software Advice. Candidates want to be kept in the loop but for many recruiters, staying in contact with all of the applicants and notifying them of each step in the hiring process is next to impossible.

Automated emails have helped this frustration as it’s easy to send an email to a couple dozen candidates letting them know they weren’t the right fit for the position or they are moving on in the process. The problem with this automation, though, is a lack of brand experience and personality. Automated emails are also not as good keeping the candidates fully engaged in the process.

Enter Karen. Chatbots have been affecting our world by advancing customer support to helping users book a flight and now they’re here to advance the world of recruiting. By using an active chatbot to communicate and engage with candidates, AI could solve the problems of the ATS black hole.

A chatbot guides candidates through the application process, take insights learned from resumes and ask candidates questions to assess their level of engagement and keep them informed about where they are in the process. Although platforms like Wade & Wendy and Mya have these abilities as well, Karen is the first to take the information learned from the chat and combine it with the scoring and ranking capabilities to present the recruiter with the best possible candidate for the position. This chat capability will also increase the brand experience for the candidate as 78% of candidates will tell their friends and family about their bad experience and 34% will post about it on social media.

Tie all these functions together and you have a winning combination of matching, scoring and ranking, and chat capabilities that will help ease the recruiter frustrations and build a bridge between the disconnect of employers and job seekers. Prior to the cognitive computing era, enterprise companies would manually review resumes or at best use keyword matching to prioritize internal and external candidate submissions. Using AI, like Karen, to improve these tactics can lower time-to-hire for recruiters and engage candidates.

Want to learn more about Karen? Visit karen.ai or read more about the creation in this press release.

Find Karen on Social Media: Twitter | LinkedIn

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