6 Tips For Writing an Effective Cold Recruiting Email

It all begins with a humble email. Written the right way, it makes candidates fall in love with your company even before they come on board.

Written the wrong way… Yours is not the only company looking for new people.

A great recruiter can persuade a hire even before they open a cold recruiting email. But to get to that point you have to invest a lot of time into building the right outreach strategy. There are several tips that will work for any kind of a recruiter.

#1 — Find a way to contact potential hires by email

Looking for candidates on LinkedIn? It might be tempting to send potential hires an InMail message. But InMails have some problems. You have a limited amount of them and many candidates don’t check their LinkedIn inbox.

But everyone checks their email. Sending an email shows that you care enough about a potential hire to find their address.

Recruiters on LinkedIn might be interested to check out LeadGibbon. It extracts business email addresses and exports them to Google Drive. A cold email has more chances to succeed if it’s in the right inbox.

#2 — Research comes first

You get a single shot to capture the attention of your candidate. It’s important not to skimp on research. Find out their interests, hobbies and previous experience. It all can be used to build a better relationship.

The research will help you understand whether a candidate is a good fit for your company. Jot down all the information you find, as it will be essential for personalizing your email.

#3 — Make your cold email as short as possible

Different recruiters make different cold email mistakes. But one is particularly widespread — a long email. Sending the full job description in an initial email is a great way to be ignored.

To make people read your emails, cut the fat. Explain how you found the candidate, why the position will be good for them and end with a call-to-action. Aim for 3-5 sentences. Consider using apps like Hemingway to check if your message is easy to read.

If the candidate is interested, you’ll have all the time in the world to discuss details in a follow-up.

#4 — Subject lines shouldn’t be dull

A generic subject line (‘Job offer’) blends with other emails in candidate’s inbox. Instead, try to find a way to make it intriguing — or even fun.

Here’s an example. Saw pictures of cats in your candidate’s Instagram feed? A subject line like ‘We at [company] are looking for a professional admirer of cats’ will guarantee you a positive reply. Think out of the box (here are some ideas to get you started).

#5 — Personalize, personalize, personalize

Cold recruiting emails is about your candidate — not about your company. Personalization doesn’t end with a subject line.

For example, compliment a potential hire on the blog post they published. This will show them that you’re following their work. You can also mention your candidate’s hobbies, side projects or mutual acquaintances. Building relationships is the best way to secure the hire.

#6 — Refute objections before they happen

Your cold recruiting email should be short. That doesn’t mean it should be meaningless. Use it to reference candidate’s doubts before they have a chance to voice them!

Here’s an example. If your candidate works in a much bigger company, they probably receive a big paycheck. To persuade them to switch, highlight why your project will be a better fit for their interests. This way, you’ll instantly position your offer as a dream job, which will overshadow smaller salary.

Start writing better recruitment emails, today

You can spend a lifetime trying to find the perfect cold email recipe. But the tips we outlined above should be enough to get you started. Research your candidates, personalize your message and find the appropriate channel to get in touch with them — and you’ll already be ahead of your competition.

 

Author
Steven Leadgibbon authorSteven is the Head of Content at LeadGibbon, a one-click tool for sales teams to find email addresses and other data for their leads. When he’s not busy with research for his latest article, Steve is binge-watching 80s horror movies or playing pick-up basketball with friends.

 

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